immiketoo

Don't be a one trick pony.

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There are so many ways to express oneself in the leather world, I encourage you to try something new.  Someone commented earlier that they don't tool.  I asked why not?  There are any number of legitimate reasons why not, but it sparked the thought that I HAVE to learn something new all the time.  Right now it's bookbinding for me.  It's a challenge that I have to learn.  There are a lot of projects I want to do in the future.  I'd like to make a bag or purse that a non-leatherworker woman would like to use.  Not the same old tired Tandy kits that everyone and their brother has made.  More like Hermes or something at that level of refinement.

It's easy to get stuck in a rut or stick with what you know.  What are some of the things you'd like to try but are afraid to venture into?  As I said, bags intimidate me.  I'm not sure why.  Maybe it's the commitment to all the steps or zippered linings or the quantity of leather to learn?

What about you? 

 

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You should. Bags aren’t hard. Everything you do for belts, you do for bags. 

Cut, tool, burnish, sew, decorate with conchos. Done. You don’t even need to use snaps or D rings. Rivets are pretty and can be your friends. Don’t forget feet. Nobody wants to put their beautiful purse flat on the bathroom floor or counter.

I make a preliminary lining by cutting the pattern out in a cotton blend, then leather weld the edges of the pattern so it won’t unravel while I’m fitting it. Don’t forget the hems before you finish sizing/fitting. It makes the lining look finished.

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You make it sound so easy!

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33 minutes ago, immiketoo said:

You make it sound so easy!

Right... Too easy.

Haven't ventured into contemporary bags but I've done my share of the Renaissance  variety,  steampunk thighbags, and plenty of sporrans... 

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1 minute ago, DV8DUG said:

Right... Too easy.

Haven't ventured into contemporary bags but I've done my share of the Renaissance  variety,  steampunk thighbags, and plenty of sporrans... 

ME too.  I classify those as pouches.  Easy, or at least doable.  I want to make wallets that arent an inch thick while empty, etc.

 

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I would like to work up the courage to do some braiding,all seems so difficult.

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I hear you there.  I can round braid pretty well, but only as lacing projects.  Stand alone braided items elude me.

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I have a gladstone bag on my bucket list made of good veg tan baybe sedgwick with goat inside and brass opening top and hand stitched.

Maybe someday when i get enough spare dosh

Maybe 

Maybe

Damm now look what you have started

Maybe

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22 minutes ago, chrisash said:

I have a gladstone bag on my bucket list made of good veg tan baybe sedgwick with goat inside and brass opening top and hand stitched.

Maybe someday when i get enough spare dosh

Maybe 

Maybe

Damm now look what you have started

Maybe

I have projects like that.  But I say maybe one day when I'm good enough.  I hate the waste of the learning process sometimes.

 

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I think the project that I want to try, but intimidates me most is a pair of properly fitted and made shoes.  

- Bill

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Well, shoes are as complex as saddles I think.  It's normal to be intimidated by them.  I'd like to make a pair or two as well.

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Yeah, shoes, definitely are on my list too. 

Luckily for this thread anyway, I'm inexperienced enough to where I'm intimidated by most things so I have a ton of new things I want to try. Tooling is definitely something I'm working on improving but am no longer intimidated by it, I just know I need work which comes with more practice.

One thing on my list is to get away from raw veg tan. I want to try  a few sides of different colored leather instead of dying all my own. I see Nigel's videos and he's using pre-dyed stuff a lot of the time and the convenience appeals to me.

I'd also like to try working with more chrome tanned leathers but the little bit I've used doesn't behave anything like veg tanned so I don't even know how to think about executing with it. Floppy. How?

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In reality, me too.  I am good at a few limited things, and I need to expand the skill set.

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15 hours ago, immiketoo said:

I HAVE to learn something new all the time.  

Thats what I thought too. So I did.   I had to diversify   where I  live, and not just in leather. 

When a customer asks me " have you ever made one of these?.... No, but I'm happy to learn "  would be my first response . Or " I've never made one before, but I like to find out"   etc. So ,  thanks to the faith that some customers have had in me over the years , as well as my own yearn to learn ,   I've been able to learn all sorts of leather related  jobs,  harness repairs, hand bag repair, custom jobs and/or repairs etc.   These jobs  I would have refused in my early days.  

But, I have  also done so many things in leather purely for my own  edification ....and,  purely  for the fun of it . Its a case  of,  " Stuff it, I'm gonna  make one , and I don't care if anyone likes it or not "  :thumbsup:  Just like a leather hat I'm ( slowly)  making , theres no market for them here....but I wanna make one anyway :) Its also good advertising   . 

But now, I also do horse rug repairs,  and canvas repairs etc. 

If I was to be a ' one trick pony' I never would have survived as long as I  have. :):) 

HS 

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1 minute ago, Handstitched said:

Thats what I thought too. So I did.   I had to diversify   where I  live, and not just in leather. 

When a customer asks me " have you ever made one of these?.... No, but I'm happy to learn "  would be my first response . Or " I've never made one before, but I like to find out"   etc. So ,  thanks to the faith that some customers have had in me over the years , as well as my own yearn to learn ,   I've been able to learn all sorts of leather related  jobs,  harness repairs, hand bag repair, custom jobs and/or repairs etc.   These jobs  I would have refused in my early days.  

But, I have  also done so many things in leather purely for my own  edification ....and,  purely  for the fun of it . Its a case  of,  " Stuff it, I'm gonna  make one , and I don't care if anyone likes it or not "  :thumbsup:  Just like a leather hat I'm ( slowly)  making , theres no market for them here....but I wanna make one anyway :) Its also good advertising   . 

But now, I also do horse rug repairs,  and canvas repairs etc. 

If I was to be a ' one trick pony' I never would have survived as long as I  have. :):) 

HS 

This is the best example of why learning new skills is important.  That and keeping your sanity!

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.....and I'm still a learner......... and loving it :) 

And don't be afraid to go outside your comfort zone, , " venture into the unknown" , as the saying goes,  sure , you  might make a few mistakes, but you could also  find a hidden talent and surprise yourself    :) 

I'm even excelling with horse rug repairs these days too. Some rugs  that come in are absolutely  and totally destroyed , but,..... I still manage to repair them, and the customers are happy  .  Thats down to much practice .  Perhaps some other repairers would probably refuse them in such poor condition. 

HS

Edited by Handstitched

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12 hours ago, immiketoo said:

I want to make wallets that arent an inch thick while empty, etc

That has been my nemesis for 40 years, and I am yet to make a wallet. At least I am moving in the right direction. I have just bought some die-cut horween wallet backs. (the 1st horween I have ever seen). 

So the fun is about to begin ... sometime before I fall off the perch!

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Can't wait to see what you make.  Also can't wait to get my hands on some horween!

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But it is easy guys. You are already doing great stitches. Tight, small, straight stitches are what make a bag look either great or amateurish.

I will admit that bags are hard to use a pony with, but other than that,  nothing to speak of.

Personally, I like a turned bag with stitching inside. That means a liner. My bag for myself is going to be made of a beautiful bit of latigo, I’m not sure if I’ll be able to turn that! :lol:

With my sisters bag, I’m making a lining that can be inserted, or removed when the owner gets bored with it. Or it needs washing. Lol.

Like I’ve said I’m a big fan of waterproof liners and removable ones. 

I’ve really got to get some pictures up...

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9 hours ago, ScoobyNewbie said:

I’ve really got to get some pictures up...

That you do! Pics, or it didn't happen. Them's the rules.

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This^^^

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23 hours ago, billybopp said:

I think the project that I want to try, but intimidates me most is a pair of properly fitted and made shoes.  

- Bill

Bill- Im considering the John Campbell shoe course (rough or worker shoes/sandals) or the "Cordwainer" in/outside Atlanta (Dress and finer fitting casual/business styles) for shoemaking- Both seem like fun and the wife and I already love the John Campbell experience (Think "Adult" summer camp on steroids- immersion therapy for crafting).

Just a bit of info if you have not considered it- here is the link to both:

Cordwainer: https://www.shoemakingcourse.com/

John Campbell:

  1. 10th century shoes: https://classes.folkschool.org/class_details.aspx?pk=21287
  2. Dress/Cordwainer: https://classes.folkschool.org/class_details.aspx?pk=21233
  3. Mocassins: https://classes.folkschool.org/class_details.aspx?pk=21370

These are in my "Stuff to learn" pile as well

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5 hours ago, SilverForgeStudio said:

Bill- Im considering the John Campbell shoe course (rough or worker shoes/sandals) or the "Cordwainer" in/outside Atlanta (Dress and finer fitting casual/business styles) for shoemaking- Both seem like fun and the wife and I already love the John Campbell experience (Think "Adult" summer camp on steroids- immersion therapy for crafting).

Just a bit of info if you have not considered it- here is the link to both:

Cordwainer: https://www.shoemakingcourse.com/

John Campbell:

  1. 10th century shoes: https://classes.folkschool.org/class_details.aspx?pk=21287
  2. Dress/Cordwainer: https://classes.folkschool.org/class_details.aspx?pk=21233
  3. Mocassins: https://classes.folkschool.org/class_details.aspx?pk=21370

These are in my "Stuff to learn" pile as well

If you are willing to go a bit farther there is https://www.chicagoschoolofshoemaking.com/

If you are up for a trip to the other coast, Jason Horvatter is in Portland.  He teaches unlasted style of shoemaking.  Jason made a video for making Scandinavian turnshoes.  I have taken several classes with Jason and have the video.  It's like being in class with him. And they are finishing up on the video for the internal stitch down work boot.  It should be done in a month or so, hopefully sooner.  http://laughingcrowe.com/

 

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@immiketoo have a look at this : 

http://leatherworker.net/forum/topic/83353-upholstered-motorcycle-seat/

Never in my wildest leather dreams would I do this....but I did.  This is a good example of a customer having a bit of faith in me ,   *sobsniff* :)  He was  one very happy chappy ....and so was I . 

I did do some research prior to taking on the job.

So now, he may show that to his friends &  pass this info onto someone else,   so if I get to do another one, I'll approach it with confidence , instead of uncertainty . 

HS 

 

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