fiftycrushplan

1st time tooling (Viking Serpent)

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Hey guys this is my first attempt at tooling I think if I perfected the beveling around the image it would really make the image pop out any tips would be great thanks!

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I think it looks very authentic. Good job!

Now do another one in 6 months time and I guaranty it will be even better. 

Is it a buckle, or a piece of art? I can’t tell the dimensions.

Again, good job!

Edited by ScoobyNewbie

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32 minutes ago, ScoobyNewbie said:

I think it looks very authentic. Good job!

Now do another one in 6 months time and I guaranty it will be even better. 

Is it a buckle, or a piece of art? I can’t tell the dimensions.

Again, good job!

It is a pece of art.  I just watched a youtube video and I should of used antique stain for the tooling part.  Do you recommend any?

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Nice work! 

Yes, almost any tooling work is best with antiquing to help the details pop.

I would recommend doing a little deeper beveling around the outside of the serpent with less aggressive backgrounding to create a harder line. 

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For your first attempt tooling, you did a great job.  So much of tooling comes with experience and feel, which will come with time, but here are a few pointers.  On any kind of carving other than floral carving, but especially with any kind of figure carving, look into getting a figure beveler.  This will make that pop you're looking for.  I have put a few examples below to show how a figure beveler can separate the background from the carving.

Next, the transitions on any viking or Celtic design where one part goes under another need to have smooth bevel transitions so it looks like a natural flow as opposed to steps down and under then back up.  Again, a figure beveler will help, but you can also smooth the transition using a modeling spoon.  Another analogy is that steep beveling makes things look like they have been pushed down into a pillow, whereas a figure beveler or spoon makes them look like they have been place on top of the leather.

If you're using antique to create contrast in your carving, checkered tools will help hold the antique and give darker areas to help pull the smooth areas to the front visually.  Figure bevelers are generally smooth though.
 

In Pic one, you can see the area around the hair is smooth except for the lines for the branches.  The figure beveler pushes down the leather smoothly and makes your art stand out.  In the second pic, you can see our the branches are behind the birds and Odin, but above the background.  Also you can see the transitions on the celtic weave.  Hope this helps.

 

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Wow, Thanks guys!  Figure beveler?  I will pick one up.  I am going to get some antique gel stain as well.  After gel stain is it  best to do a 50/50 water resolene seal or should I do something different?  Thanks again guys.

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Always seal after antique.  I use RTC by Bee Natural.

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Nice work with the carving,keep at it!I I have just started out doing basic shilouette carving and know there is a long road ahead.

Immiketoo thanks for sharing those tips,a few words and images can teach a great deal sometimes.

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10 hours ago, noobleather said:

Nice work with the carving,keep at it!I I have just started out doing basic shilouette carving and know there is a long road ahead.

Immiketoo thanks for sharing those tips,a few words and images can teach a great deal sometimes.

Thanks, Noob. Pics are great, but videos are even better.   IF you guys have any requests, let me know.

 

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On 12/10/2018 at 8:35 AM, immiketoo said:

...In Pic one, you can see the area around the hair is smooth except for the lines for the branches.  The figure beveler pushes down the leather smoothly and makes your art stand out.  In the second pic, you can see our the branches are behind the birds and Odin, but above the background.  Also you can see the transitions on the celtic weave.  Hope this helps.

Wow, Mike - once again, your carving is off the hook, and SO darned CLEAN!
Inspirational, my friend!

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Here is an update I re-done the piece with your alls advice and used antique gel.  I like this one much better.

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Yup - better and better ! :)
Feels pretty good, doesn't it?
 

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Looks a lot better.  If you want to clean up the outside portion, use a damp towel to scrub off some of the antique.  Also, sheep wool with 50/50 tankote works really well too, and helps seal in the antique when it dries.  DId you use Fiebeng's paste, or did you use an acrylic antique?

YinTx

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39 minutes ago, YinTx said:

Looks a lot better.  If you want to clean up the outside portion, use a damp towel to scrub off some of the antique.  Also, sheep wool with 50/50 tankote works really well too, and helps seal in the antique when it dries.  DId you use Fiebeng's paste, or did you use an acrylic antique?

YinTx

I ordered the fiebings antique dye  but I also got the eco flo and I used the eco flo on this one.  I thought it looked better when I was testing it out.  I used 50/50 resolene to water for finish as all I have is resolene and aussie conditioner.

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If you have already put the seal coat on, it will probably not change much from what you have.  In the future, try a wet towel to even out the antique outside of your tooled areas when using acrylic antiques like the eco flo, you may like the results.  Also, applying tankote 50/50 before and allowing it to dry 8hrs before antique will give a different (lighter, more evenly colored) look as well.

YinTx

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Thanks everyone!  I have been meaning to get some tan kote for a while now.  If I am not mistaken will tan kote smooth out the fleshy side of leather as well?  Or is that edge coat?  Thanks all for the compliments.  It does feel pretty cool to say I have gone from mere sheath maker to tooling apprentice LOL.

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On ‎27‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 3:30 AM, fiftycrushplan said:

will tan kote smooth out the fleshy side of leather as well? 

I believe what you need is Gum Tragacanth. Apply a thin coat then burnish with a smooth burnishing stick.

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As Rockoboy mentioned, gum trag will work. I tend to use Tan-Kote to slick the back of leather, and it works well for me.    I've heard of some using Resolene for the same purpose.  I just apply, and slick with a glass slicker until dry and smooth.

YinTx

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Here is what I did with the original.  Turned it onto a sheath.

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