cseeger

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About cseeger

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  • Birthday September 16

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  1. cseeger

    How To Make Coin Conchos

    Thank you for the nice comments everyone. There are a few terrific tips I forgot to include in the tutorial and it's been bugging the heck out of me to share these. I tried twice to update the tutorial but I cannot control my editing urge to just rewrite the whole thing and go down every rabbit hole I can think of. So, I'm leaving the tutorial as is and have added an Addendum which you can download from the original post. While I was at it I uploaded a demonstration video on YouTube but have also embedded in the original post for this thread. ' Thanks again for your interest and hope to see some examples and interpretations from y'all soon. EDIT: Well danggit the original post is locked down. I don't know why they do that. It makes it impossible to update tutorials in any sensible way. Im going to ask for special permission from .....who is it that runs this place anyway? Joann? I've sent her I don't how many messages and she hasn't answered a single one. Ok, that's probably like three messages but still. Whatever... Here's the addendum and the video. How To Make Coin Conchos Addendum.pdf
  2. cseeger

    The Flatland Drifter

    No kidding. I can see where that would be a fun and rewarding hobby. Actually, hardly anyone has seen this bike Probably no more than a dozen people other than neighbors. I live in the Dallas area and the best time to ride is late late night. It's much cooler, there's no traffic out or people so I let my dog off leash and we cruise around the churches and school parking lots. The police get a big kick out of it though. lol Actually, i'd like to sell it and build another one..but this time .an ebike. But how do you get in touch with those Silicon Valley rich boys? I think they're my target market as its money they have and cool they lack and Burning Man is right around the corner. Hey, maybe you can help with this idea. What I would like rig up is a system where all the lights and battery packs tie back to an ignition switch with a key. Any thoughts come to mind on something like that?
  3. cseeger

    The Flatland Drifter

    I did skive but not to taper or thin the leather to get it to form fit, rather, I skived off excess material underneath where it had gathered and wrinkled, the nose and the two rear corners. I said earlier than I had glued it, but 20+ pneumatic staples suggest otherwise. I did get it soaking wet and stretched the heck out of it to get it to form fit. It was also a 2-3 oz and not 3-4 oz as stated earlier. It helped A LOT that the saddle was the shape that it is. The big triangle wide butt saddles that I settled on because they are more comfortable , there is no way I could have wet formed fit those dudes. I didn't even try. Just cut darts and let the rough end drag. Just a guess, but Chrome tan is probably the cause of not getting a neat form fit. You can stretch the heck out of veg tan as all the hide pounders know all too well. But after all the rigamarole of changing seats, I changed the seat AGAIN just days ago and this time back to the original seat from a year ago. The infamous seat that started this whole project off as just going to recover a seat. I loved the color of the seat in the photo so I just took a sander to the original seat and got it back to a sort of veg tan look. Problem solved. And yes I did indeed make leather boxes for those battery packs AND added another light assembly to the front and that was leather boxed too. What does it look like with all those lights on? Like this: Bike Lights.mp4
  4. cseeger

    The Flatland Drifter

    I just recovered a used seat. Carefully remove the the old covering so as to not remove the foam padding underneath. Then wet form with a piece of 3-4 oz Veg Tan and glue it underneath the plastic seat base. I also applied saddle soap to get a waxy finish. While the seat looks terrific, it wasn't very comfortable. So I swapped it out (again) with a wide butt seat that I recovered (again). I think I'm slowly working my way up to something like this. :
  5. cseeger

    How To Make Coin Conchos

    I'm sorry TLP. I know you're just trying to help, but your suggestions are just plain wrong and I want to assure my tutorial readers that the soldering tools, supplies and processes as described in the tutorial will yield perfectly acceptable and STRONG coin conchos. Apparently micro torches have improved over the past several years. Just to demonstrate, I chose the largest coin in my inventory, a vintage UK Penny which is about as big of a coin there is. It's essentially identical in size and weight to a US Walking Liberty Half Dollar. Using only my Harbor Freight Micro Torch, the solder flowed and created that solder joint in the picture in 38 seconds. And look at how nice that solder joint turned out. That's as good as it gets for a coin concho solder joint. I agree that you should not use soft plumbing solder to make coin conchos. Soft plumbing solder, otherwise known as lead solder, has a much lower melting temp and is indeed a soft solder with a low tensile strength. Fortunately, you won't find lead solder at Home Depot or any other regular retail outfit. Ever since it was regulated out of plumbing service, all that is available for sale is no lead solder which has a much higher melting temp and far greater tensile strength. The plumbing solder I have is Oatey's Safe Flo Solder, a run of the mill Home Depot retail item. It has a tensile strength rating of 5,900 psi. To put that in perspective, a standard scuba tank is rated at at 3,000 psi which means that the force required to make the Oatey solder joint fail is more than the force required to blow up a scuba tank. I've made many conchos as described in the tutorial and have never had one fail because the joint wasn't strong enough. Conchos are mostly used for decoration anyway and the fact is you don't even need to solder decorative conchos. E6000 glue will work just fine. That stuff is crazy strong and flexible bond. I should have put that in the tutorial as well. I use E6000 a lot. A Pickling Pot? If I had a dedicated metal working studio, yeah, I'd have a pickling pot. But for the average Joe who makes a few conchos here and there, it's overkill. But to each his own. Personally, I have no problems cleaning and polishing without pickling. Note that the exposed side of a concho doesn't have flux applied to it. But I will say this for those of you who would like to try pickling, it's a little more involved than just whipping up a batch of vinegar and salt. You need to educate yourself on the chemical reactions with different metals. It's an acid and you need to be careful working with it and properly disposing etc.
  6. cseeger

    The Flatland Drifter

    Did some upgrades and mods to the Flatland Drifter as prep for her second riding season. Changed the seat, (again) , wrapped the handlebars, made new grips, changed the accent color to red., and added three tail lights. Upgraded to a rechargeable lithium battery system and made leather boxes for the battery packs (not shown -- just imagine really cool leather boxes then back off that a couple notches). Then I got real ambitous and repacked the hubs and ended up getting the tires all out of whack and had to have a bike mechanic fix it. But man she glides now....downhill and on flatland that is. Thinking about converting her to an ebike to save my dogs the embarrassment of me walking her up hills at the local bike park. Underneath the 5oz leather wrap is a portly steel tubing Huffy -- it weighs a frickin' ton.
  7. cseeger

    Need A Dog Harness Pattern

    I wasn't familiar with Zena and had to look her up. Google Brain knew what I was after and directed me to Xena: Warrior Princess. Yeah, I can see the connection.
  8. cseeger

    Need A Dog Harness Pattern

    Ok, here it is again with a couple more pics. My pattern omits the straps that connect the saddle to the belly, but that's easy enough to figure out. I've only made a few dog harnesses but through trial and error arrived at this version which worked well for what I was trying to accomplish. The main thing I learned from previous attempts was to make the harness from a single piece of leather and to wet mold it. This provided for a much better look and was far easier than piecing together multiple straps. It also provide me with a lot of real estate for embellishment. For adjustment reference, this pattern fits an averaged size female pit bull (19" tall, 40 lbs weight) . Dog Harness Pattern.pdf
  9. cseeger

    Need A Dog Harness Pattern

    Dog Harness Pattern.pdf
  10. cseeger

    Pair of Cupsole Chukkas

    Haha...clever. You always say the nicest things.
  11. cseeger

    Pair of Cupsole Chukkas

    Thanks! The rest of the materials were 5 oz Nubuck for the uppers (no lining), 4 oz Horween Veg Tan Horsehide for the insole and toe puff, 2 oz Kidskin for the eyelet reinforcement and boot rim. The heel counter was also 5 oz Nubuck. 1 mm thread Twin Eagle thread for the uppers and 1 mm Ritza Tiger thread for the side stitching,. Also discovered and used for the first time on this pair a "Jerk Awl" to do the side stiching (also called Jerk Needle, Hooked Needle). Man it's sooo much easier, faster and better looking to side stitch using that awl. Previously I had just been using needles (and long pliers) and then recently the speed stitcher. They don't hold a candle to a Jerk Awl.
  12. cseeger

    Pair of Cupsole Chukkas

    Pair of Cupsole Chukkas I made for myself. The interesting part of this is the cupsole itself. These are rare as hen's teeth for the U.S. hobbyist to source and crazy expensive for no more than what they are (Etsy $25-$30, Brooklyn Shoe Supply $50). But I came up with a low cost solution that I'll share with you. I buy slip-on sneakers at Walmart and carefully remove the canvas uppers (tip, use a heat gun to loosen the glued parts). If you don't mind a little elbow grease, the Walmart method will yield good quality rubber cupsoles for $7 - $8.
  13. cseeger

    Etsy Alternatives Help

    I'm old enough to remember when "Made in Japan" was a derisive phrase that implied cheap crap. Today, what comes to mind when you see "Made in Japan"? High quality, right? “Made in China” no longer necessarily means cheap or knock-off, though that still exists. China has the expertise, the engineers, and the infrastructure to make quality products, and is doing so. It also has the necessary drivers: a growing middle class with buying power, and the desire to improve the “made in China” brand and compete head-to-head in the global market. Another two decades? Globalization fellas, get used to it. Money doesn't care what country it originates from.
  14. Hey Mike, any of this color left? If so I'd be interested in a side, shipped to 75069. Thx