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Happy St Paddys day to everyone a bit early. Was wondering today what the Irish really eat on the holiday? I'm going to have a corned elk roast But i as i peruse the net it is becoming apparent the Irish don't eat corned beef. What do they eat? Bangers and mash or is that British? The last time my family was in Ireland was right after the titanic sank lol.

ireland2.jpg

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1 hour ago, chuck123wapati said:

The last time my family was in Ireland was right after the titanic sank lol.

Great photo!  My family left around the same time. ☘️

Mom described Sunday dinner with her father's Irish family as "over-boiled chicken and limp, greasy cabbage, all from one pot."  No seasoning, just... bleah.

I have to believe Irish food is better than that (and that my great-grandmother was just a lousy cook). :blink:

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The OIrish have a few national foods or dishes but they/we don't eat any specific one on St.Paddy's day

Some national foods;

Colcannon - mashed potato with diced up white cabbage  through it. Some people cook the cabbage, I like it uncooked, served hot with loads of butter, often served up with some thick rashers of bacon or just on its own

Champ -  mashed potato with scallions, aka spring onions, milk and lashings of butter mixed up, served with just about any meat or just on its own

Potato bread, a bread made on the griddle with mashed potato mixed into the batter, served hot, either straight from the griddle, toasted or fried, with loads of butter

Soda bread, a bread made on the griddle, served hot, fried or toasted or straight from the griddle, with loads of butter

Irish/Ulster fry - 2 each of soda bread, potato bread, fried egg, pork sausage, thick bacon slices and loads of butter for the breads and eggs [no tomatoes or baked beans, these are added for the English visitors]

Irish Stew - lamb or mutton stewed with potatoes, parsnip, turnip and carrots. A thick stew, served with soda bread on the side, not forgetting the butter

Drinks;

Tea

Whiskey

Lager beer

Stout, aka Guinness

Regular beer

There'll be local parades, but most of us will avoid them [usually riots during and after them] and just get on with things as another day

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1 hour ago, fredk said:

The OIrish have a few national foods or dishes but they/we don't eat any specific one on St.Paddy's day

Some national foods;

Colcannon - mashed potato with diced up white cabbage  through it. Some people cook the cabbage, I like it uncooked, served hot with loads of butter, often served up with some thick rashers of bacon or just on its own

Champ -  mashed potato with scallions, aka spring onions, milk and lashings of butter mixed up, served with just about any meat or just on its own

Potato bread, a bread made on the griddle with mashed potato mixed into the batter, served hot, either straight from the griddle, toasted or fried, with loads of butter

Soda bread, a bread made on the griddle, served hot, fried or toasted or straight from the griddle, with loads of butter

Irish/Ulster fry - 2 each of soda bread, potato bread, fried egg, pork sausage, thick bacon slices and loads of butter for the breads and eggs [no tomatoes or baked beans, these are added for the English visitors]

Irish Stew - lamb or mutton stewed with potatoes, parsnip, turnip and carrots. A thick stew, served with soda bread on the side, not forgetting the butter

Drinks;

Tea

Whiskey

Lager beer

Stout, aka Guinness

Regular beer

There'll be local parades, but most of us will avoid them [usually riots during and after them] and just get on with things as another day

yum! it all sounds good!! I love soda bread, we have it every year. And champ every week or so with sausage usually. Never heard of Colcannon but it sounds good too we have cabbage fried in butter often.

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1 hour ago, ButtonLady said:

Great photo!  My family left around the same time. ☘️

Mom described Sunday dinner with her father's Irish family as "over-boiled chicken and limp, greasy cabbage, all from one pot."  No seasoning, just... bleah.

I have to believe Irish food is better than that (and that my great-grandmother was just a lousy cook). :blink:

Thanks my ggrand dad came over in the 1800s but went back to visit then and my g grand mother took the photos i managed to retrieve this off of her original glass negatives. the man in the white shirt i believe would be a g g uncle. 

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3 hours ago, chuck123wapati said:

There'll be local parades, but most of us will avoid them [usually riots during and after them] and just get on with things as another day

I thought those days were over... :(

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8 hours ago, fredk said:

The OIrish have a few national foods or dishes but they/we don't eat any specific one on St.Paddy's day

Some national foods;

Colcannon - mashed potato with diced up white cabbage  through it. Some people cook the cabbage, I like it uncooked, served hot with loads of butter, often served up with some thick rashers of bacon or just on its own

Champ -  mashed potato with scallions, aka spring onions, milk and lashings of butter mixed up, served with just about any meat or just on its own

Potato bread, a bread made on the griddle with mashed potato mixed into the batter, served hot, either straight from the griddle, toasted or fried, with loads of butter

Soda bread, a bread made on the griddle, served hot, fried or toasted or straight from the griddle, with loads of butter

Irish/Ulster fry - 2 each of soda bread, potato bread, fried egg, pork sausage, thick bacon slices and loads of butter for the breads and eggs [no tomatoes or baked beans, these are added for the English visitors]

Irish Stew - lamb or mutton stewed with potatoes, parsnip, turnip and carrots. A thick stew, served with soda bread on the side, not forgetting the butter

Drinks;

Tea

Whiskey

Lager beer

Stout, aka Guinness

Regular beer

There'll be local parades, but most of us will avoid them [usually riots during and after them] and just get on with things as another day

Sounds like the National food is BUTTER! :lol:

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21 hours ago, chuck123wapati said:

Happy St Paddys day to everyone a bit early. Was wondering today what the Irish really eat on the holiday? I'm going to have a corned elk roast But i as i peruse the net it is becoming apparent the Irish don't eat corned beef. What do they eat? Bangers and mash or is that British? The last time my family was in Ireland was right after the titanic sank lol.

 

This video went up on YouTube yesterday - It explains that corned beef is both ancient and modern in Irish cuisine.  The short version is that beef was preferred in the ancient past, but at some point pork became more popular - and bacon and cabbage likely the preferred dish.  When later Irish immigrants came to the USA, they largely settled in the same neighborhoods as Jewish immigrants did.  Not being kosher, bacon was off the menu, so they started using corned beef.

As a side note, many on my mother's side of the family came from Ireland in the 1660s, and settled in the Quaker colony of West Jersey (Yup!  Jersey was the quaker colony before Pennsylvania was!  It's a long story with much treachery on the part of the English).  Two of my ancestors were signatories to "The Concession and Agreement of the Lords Proprietors of the Province of New Caesarea, or New Jersey" which would serve as the constitution for New Jersey until 1947, and were also used as a model for the US constitution and its bill of rights.  

- Bill

 

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Between Chuck's corned elk roast, Fred's entire menu, and Billy's link to Ye Olde Corned Beef... I am seriously hungry!

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sooooo... Happy day folks!!!!!   Corned beast & cabbage & potatoes with lotsa butter , Soda bread with raisins and lotsa butter, Lotsa Guinness stout in a clean glass no butter. :banana:Oh and the wife and kids gotta make shamrock shakes also with no butter lol.

I love this holiday, Beer and food and fun. 

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I had two pints of Guiness for St Paddy's Day. I'm not Irish....but what the heck . Actually my ' ye olde' ancestry is Welsh..... I think. Which may explain why  I eat leeks  a lot ...??..  :dunno:  Just a giant spring onion really. 

 I don't know a single word in Welsh, except ' Cymru'   ( Wales) . It helps to have a gob full of snot to say it. 

The Guiness was yum  btw  :thumbsup:

HS

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On 3/16/2022 at 12:53 AM, tsunkasapa said:

Sounds like the National food is BUTTER! :lol:

Remember this?

Let me share with you something I read just recently [actually a few weeks ago]

Background; this was written by Archbishop Rinuccini, the Pope's envoy to Ireland in 1645. His job was to supply weapons, food and money to the main groups of Irish rebels active at that time.  Although he had plenty of all supplies he still had to spread it around. When it came to distribution of food supplies he gave most to one group as

'the Ulster rebels have no caring for bread and live on trefoil* and butter. Their drink is milk and for a great treat whiskey'

'. . . provisioning of the [Ulster] army during a campaign little more than a great number of cows to provide milk and butter with which the people of that country, particularly those of Ulster, usually live, with a little addition of oat meal'

* nobody, as yet, has determined what this 'trefoil' is but it may be Birds-foot. The milk or butter mixed with it may eliminate the poisons

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Very interesting, Fred! Trefoil, of course, means three-leaved, and of course there are many plants that meet that description. I wonder if the plant was actually Oxalis, which is frequently eaten by people: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxalis

I've always know my father's mother's people were from Ireland, and in the last few years, I've been working on the family history. They came from Limerick (Rathkeale) and were actually descended from German refugees who left the Rhineland Palatinate area after it was devastated by war with France in the late 1700's.  After there arrival in Britain, Queen Anne sent them to Ireland to work as tenant farmers for the wealthy English landowners.

My dad often wondered if they were pioneers in Ontario, and recently I was able to verify that, by finding the crown land grant that was given to them in 1824! :o

Yes, it's very hard to read, but if you look at what's written on the right it says: In council 29th September 1824: Recommended 200 acres. Order issued September 30th 1824.

 

 

John Long land petition4.jpg

Edited by Sheilajeanne

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On 5/5/2022 at 12:20 AM, Sheilajeanne said:

Very interesting, Fred! Trefoil, of course, means three-leaved, and of course there are many plants that meet that description. I wonder if the plant was actually Oxalis, which is frequently eaten by people: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxalis

I've always know my father's mother's people were from Ireland, and in the last few years, I've been working on the family history. They came from Limerick (Rathkeale) and were actually descended from German refugees who left the Rhineland Palatinate area after it was devastated by war with France in the late 1700's.  After there arrival in Britain, Queen Anne sent them to Ireland to work as tenant farmers for the wealthy English landowners.

My dad often wondered if they were pioneers in Ontario, and recently I was able to verify that, by finding the crown land grant that was given to them in 1824! :o

Yes, it's very hard to read, but if you look at what's written on the right it says: In council 29th September 1824: Recommended 200 acres. Order issued September 30th 1824.

 

 

John Long land petition4.jpg

I always thought i was about half Irish and half German.  do a dna test you will be surprised where you really came from lol!!! the results change as more folks do them and more data is collected but still very accurate. i have no idea why the data saved as it did? i have over 31,000 dna matches on ancestry alone.

Ethnicity Estimate

  •  
    Scotland31%
  •  
    England & Northwestern Europe24%
  •  
    Wales15%
  •  
    Norway10%
  •  
    Ireland8%
  •  
    Sweden & Denmark5%
  •  
    Germanic Europe5%
  •  
    Benin & Togo1%
  •  
    Cameroon, Congo & Western Bantu Peoples1%
Edited by chuck123wapati
more info

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Chuck - wow!!  :o Very interesting!

Some of my family members who remember world wars with Germany were upset to find out about the German ancestry. Which is pretty silly, because it dates back to long before either WWI or WWII. 

On my mother's side of the family, her grandmother and grandfather immigrated from Germany at the time of Bismarck. I found it interesting that the grandmother's ancestry suddenly changed to 'Canadian' from 'German' on the Canadian census done at the time of the first world war! :lol:

Maybe I'll get around to doing my DNA profile one of these days... 

Edited by Sheilajeanne

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I'm 100% US American, 50% Bohemian, 50% Ulster Irish, 25% Irish Scots, 25% German, 10% English, 5% Polish, 5% Jugoslavian but 100% just ME

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12 hours ago, fredk said:

but 100% just ME

I've never given what I am much thought. I know I have a some Welsh in me, from my Fathers side ....somewhere, can't speak  word of Welsh,  may explain why I eat leaks, theres definitely some pommy ( english)  in me . I was born in Suffolk. But a part of me has a bit of Greek in me...I think, going by my last name .  I eat a lot of cheese , pickles, & salami's and small goods :dunno: 

But I love a pint of  brown ale & fish 'n' chips .

Or it could be that fact ......I'm just a glutton :rofl:<<<<< :17: 

HS

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The last of my ancestors to come to the USA from Europe was a great grandfather born on a ship coming from Edinburgh in 1850.   I figure that makes me 100% US American.  :)

- Bill

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On 5/8/2022 at 5:28 AM, billybopp said:

The last of my ancestors to come to the USA from Europe was a great grandfather born on a ship coming from Edinburgh in 1850.   I figure that makes me 100% US American.  :)

- Bill

 

On 5/8/2022 at 4:56 AM, Handstitched said:

I've never given what I am much thought. I know I have a some Welsh in me, from my Fathers side ....somewhere, can't speak  word of Welsh,  may explain why I eat leaks, theres definitely some pommy ( english)  in me . I was born in Suffolk. But a part of me has a bit of Greek in me...I think, going by my last name .  I eat a lot of cheese , pickles, & salami's and small goods :dunno: 

But I love a pint of  brown ale & fish 'n' chips .

Or it could be that fact ......I'm just a glutton :rofl:<<<<< :17: 

HS

i have two Welsh families of Morgan's in my ancestry one of which i have documented to the point of knowing the ship they sailed on to America, and why they chose to come over on Mormon ships. lol. That Mormon mercenary tie to the Uk is a very interesting piece of history not many people understand or even know about

On 5/7/2022 at 4:16 PM, fredk said:

I'm 100% US American, 50% Bohemian, 50% Ulster Irish, 25% Irish Scots, 25% German, 10% English, 5% Polish, 5% Jugoslavian but 100% just ME

 

On 5/7/2022 at 12:51 PM, Sheilajeanne said:

Chuck - wow!!  :o Very interesting!

Some of my family members who remember world wars with Germany were upset to find out about the German ancestry. Which is pretty silly, because it dates back to long before either WWI or WWII. 

On my mother's side of the family, her grandmother and grandfather immigrated from Germany at the time of Bismarck. I found it interesting that the grandmother's ancestry suddenly changed to 'Canadian' from 'German' on the Canadian census done at the time of the first world war! :lol:

Maybe I'll get around to doing my DNA profile one of these days... 

being 100% American goes without saying lol, in fact I'm fifth generation Wyomingite which IMO makes me indigenous to Wyoming. But the trip my DnA has led through history is very interesting to me and is unique to everyone. I can now see for example my Montgomery line, which I thought was Scots Irish actually came from Normandy with Charles the great, and before that Normandy and before that from Sweden and Finland and also somewhere in history, most think prehistory from Africa. I can read and document my ancestors lives through the building of America, i have had family in every major war ever fought by the US, and on almost every new frontier during the founding of our great country. We are all a tiny bit of almost every ancestor before us and i also think if we all knew our historic past there would be much less racism and hatred in the world.

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13 hours ago, chuck123wapati said:

We are all a tiny bit of almost every ancestor before us and i also think if we all knew our historic past there would be much less racism and hatred in the world.

Very true! All of us except for indigenous people were immigrants at one time, and my German/Irish ancestors were also refugees.

The only one of my dad's family to fight in WWII was my eldest uncle, who helped to liberate Holland. Farmers were exempt, as the livestock needed looking after, and someone had to grow food to feed the people. My dad went to enlist, but they saw shadows on his lung x-rays and told him he had TB, and essentially sent him home to die. 

It must have been dust from the threshing on the farm because, as a teacher, he frequently was tested for TB, and the tests were always negative. He did develop respiratory problems in his old age, probably due to all that dust he inhaled before leaving the farm (farmer's lung). He lived to be 89, just missing his 90th birthday be 3 weeks!

Another uncle worked on the home front for the RCMP, helping to track down Nazis and other foreign agents.

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5 hours ago, Sheilajeanne said:

(farmer's lung).

For shearers, its ' silicosis ' . Not very well known and not talked about enough in the  sheep shearing industry .  I was part of it for a time. Glad I left it. 

19 hours ago, chuck123wapati said:

i have two Welsh families of Morgan's in my ancestry

Any relation to ' Captain Morgan' , as in rum ??  Just .....thought I'd ask.... :)  :) 

At the end of the day, well all  have something in common . We love friendship, fellowship , leather, food, drink,  Mother Nature & the great outdoors. And who knows, we may even be related  somewhere along the  long looooooong line  :dunno: 

HS

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The dangers of farming are not well known to the general public. Injuries from livestock or farm equipment are all too common - one of my uncles broke both his ankles when his pant leg caught in the hay elevator. He also accidentally ran over one of his son's with the disc harrow, when the boy fell off the back of the tractor! :o  He suffered from farmer's lung in his old age, but still managed to outlive all of his siblings. And that's JUST one of the six families who stayed in farming! (There were 10 kids in my dad's immediate family.)

Out of those six families, some of the grandchildren farmed for awhile, but as of today, they have all taken other safer and more lucrative jobs. One quit due to several friends dying of cancer. This got him concerned over the many chemicals farmers are exposed to, especially the pesticides. I think my father's youngest sister's grandson may be doing dairy, judging by what I see on his FB timeline, but I don't talk with him, so I'm not sure. I know his dad worked as a welder after his parents sold their farm.

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10 hours ago, Sheilajeanne said:

Very true! All of us except for indigenous people were immigrants at one time, and my German/Irish ancestors were also refugees.

The only one of my dad's family to fight in WWII was my eldest uncle, who helped to liberate Holland. Farmers were exempt, as the livestock needed looking after, and someone had to grow food to feed the people. My dad went to enlist, but they saw shadows on his lung x-rays and told him he had TB, and essentially sent him home to die. 

It must have been dust from the threshing on the farm because, as a teacher, he frequently was tested for TB, and the tests were always negative. He did develop respiratory problems in his old age, probably due to all that dust he inhaled before leaving the farm (farmer's lung). He lived to be 89, just missing his 90th birthday be 3 weeks!

Another uncle worked on the home front for the RCMP, helping to track down Nazis and other foreign agents.

As you learn some real life history through genealogy you will find some surprising stuff indeed. Many countries sent their criminals and poor to the Americas to get rid of them, Germany and the UK especially. Many of Irish decent came as indentured servants, ( nice name for a slaves) and were thought at the time lower or as low in stature as the African slaves. Life wasn't easy for the poor back then and basically only two classes of people rich or poor. Free poor folks were farmers mostly because if they didn't farm they would starve that's all they had.

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Coming to Upper Canada was definitely a good move for my 'anchor ancestor'. If he had remained in Ireland as a tenant farmer, he never would have owned the land he farmed, nor would he have had anything to pass on to his children. In Canada, he was able to get 200 acres of land from the government for free, as long as he developed it within a certain number of years. Not an easy task when the land was all virgin forest!

He did rather well for himself, In 1861, the first year for which I have a census record, he was living in a brick house while his neighbours were still in log cabins. 

The two biggest surprises I've found so far are that my great grandmother's first husband was assistant editor for The Mail, a Toronto newspaper which eventually merged with George Brown's Globe to become The Globe and Mail. The Globe and Mail is one of Canada's best known newspapers. His mother also worked for The Mail, as a reporter. This would have been a very unusual job for a woman back in the 1860's. She had to work,  however, as her husband had died. 

Secondly, I recently discovered there's a stained glass window in the church I attend that's dedicated to the parents of one of my great uncles. Both he and his father were physicians, so the window is dedicated to St. Luke.

 

 

Bell family small_crop.jpg

Edited by Sheilajeanne

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