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Pet peeves - Ugh!

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4 hours ago, Northmount said:

The metric system adopted by Canada (The International System of Units (SI)) does not define a dozen.  It's not a metric term.  SI Practice Guide is available at https://www.csagroup.org/store/product/2701339/

It's your Vernon grocer/supplier that is decreasing the number of eggs per carton, and likely keeping the same price as what your dozen was.  You should have noticed this long ago.  Packages are getting smaller, and prices are going up at the same time.  Compare a 5 cent chocolate bar from 1960 size wise and price wise today.  More shrinkflation!

That's the real pet peeve.

The first thing that illuminated this practice for me was the "Wagon Wheel". When I was a whippersnapper they were enormous, around 6/7 inches x 1/2 inch. Now they're the size of a biscuit.

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1 hour ago, stampingdelight said:

not run into all listed anyone ever get a patten that once you cut out is a little off? not sure if the pattern or cutting out yet I fallow the line so not sure 

yes, I bought some pattern of etsy. Cut them out, punched the sewing holes where the pattern said. Impossible to sew up 

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24 minutes ago, toxo said:

The first thing that illuminated this practice for me was the "Wagon Wheel". When I was a whippersnapper they were enormous, around 6/7 inches x 1/2 inch. Now they're the size of a biscuit.

Yes they were great!  Now with their small size, I'm not interested anymore, plus developed a problem with all gluten products.  So many treats are now on my bad list!

 

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LOL, Fred! 

Yes, we're bilingual in Canada too, when it comes to metric and Imperial. Gas is in litres, but I ask for a pint at the pub. Beer is sold in cans and bottles by the millilitre, though. The mish-mash of different measures is really pretty crazy. I have a set of open ended/box wrenches in both systems, as you never know for sure what system the machine you're fixing is going to have. 

For some reason 10 m.m. wrenches and sockets tend to vanish. I once bought a set of 6 sockets at Canadian Tire, only to find some bozo had replace the 10 m.m. (the only one I REALLY needed!) with a 1/2 in. socket, then returned the set to the store!!  Oh, was I steamed! Fortunately C.T. was really good about exchanging the set. 

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My 1930 Austin 7 Ulster has 15 different types of bolt threads on it. Just to do minor servicing on it we have to have a mahoosive tool box with every type of spanner you never heard of.  I owned a Cadillac Coupe DeVille, it had, afair, 7 different bolt threads on it. It was built in Lynden, (spelling?) New Jersey

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Parsons (British) 5MW steam turbine generators pre-WWII and post-WWII, different thread pitch and wrench sizes.  Both units sitting side by side, looked identical.

Had to maintain 2 sets of spares and wrenches.  I learned a lot in that power plant.  First job in a thermal generating station 1969.  Re-bladed the last 2 rows of blades.

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6 hours ago, Sheilajeanne said:

For some reason 10 m.m. wrenches and sockets tend to vanish. I once bought a set of 6 sockets at Canadian Tire, only to find some bozo had replace the 10 m.m. (the only one I REALLY needed!) with a 1/2 in. socket, then returned the set to the store!!  Oh, was I steamed! Fortunately C.T. was really good about exchanging the set. 

I have a separate LOCKING drawer that I keep all my 10mm sockets and wrenches in. I'm positive that aliens are behind the whole thing.

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I'm still here :thumbsup: Still haven't got interwebby thingy , using public access ...still.  Finally got rid of my old :ranting2: ISP after giving them a bollocking for not taking responsibility for their actions, ...and never will. They are no more :banana: might have found a newie . 

Moving right along ....

HS

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On 5/20/2024 at 2:02 AM, tsunkasapa said:

I have a separate LOCKING drawer that I keep all my 10mm sockets and wrenches in. I'm positive that aliens are behind the whole thing.

tsunkasapa, they even have memes about it!

https://www.tiktok.com/@infamous10mm/video/7223523711377329450?lang=en

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On 5/19/2024 at 8:12 PM, fredk said:

Fuel and most other liquids are in litres

You got to remember the Imperial measurement for liquids is different then the US system of measurements. A US gallon is only equal to 3.78 litres or put another way the US pint is about 20 percent smaller then what you get at a pub. Also the US ton is a short ton at 2000 pounds verses a real ton at 2240 pounds.

kgg

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19 hours ago, kgg said:

You got to remember the Imperial measurement for liquids is different then the US system of measurements. A US gallon is only equal to 3.78 litres or put another way the US pint is about 20 percent smaller then what you get at a pub. Also the US ton is a short ton at 2000 pounds verses a real ton at 2240 pounds.

kgg

A little break down of US and Imperial fluid measures.

1 cup is 8 fl oz.

US Pint is 16 fl oz.  Imperial Pint is 20 fl oz.

US Quart is 32 fl oz.  Imperial Quart is 40 fl oz.

US Gallon is 128 fl oz.  Imperial Gallon is 160 fl oz.

 

Dealing with tonnage, SI uses the term tonne for 1000 kg, 2240 2204.62 pounds.

 

Edited by Northmount
corrected tonne conversion

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16 hours ago, Northmount said:

Dealing with tonnage, SI uses the term tonne for 1000 kg, 2240 pounds.

@NorthmountI think you probably mistyped as 1000 kg is equal to 2204.62  pounds. There are three measurements for tonnage, sometimes noted as the French term -- tonnes:

i) Imperial (British) ton: Long ton, 2240 pounds.

ii) Metric ton (SI): 1000 kg = 2204 pounds

iii) US ton: Short ton, 2000 pounds

The difference between the Imperial and the US ton is that the British based their hundredweight on "stone weight" where a stone was 14 pounds and 8 stones was their hundredweight at 112 pounds verses the US based theirs hundredweight on having 100 pounds. The hundredweight was the sack weight a man could carry. I guess the Brits were stronger.

kgg

Edited by kgg

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9 minutes ago, kgg said:

I think you probably mistyped as 1000 kg is equal to 2204.62  pounds. There are three measurements for tonnage, sometimes noted as the French term -- tonnes:

That should be 2204.62 pounds.  The SI Standard and user guide used in Canada uses the term tonne for 1000 kg.

 

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On 5/19/2024 at 9:12 PM, fredk said:

Although we adopted the metric system we still buy fresh food by the pound & ounces. Pre-packaged foods are in kilograms and grams. Fuel and most other liquids are in litres, but down in pub you buy a pint. We're bi-lingual

Last week I asked my butcher for about 1/2 a kilogram of mince beef. He gave me a blank stare. I said - about 500 grams. Blank stare. Give me a pound of mince. Instant action 

 

A good few years ago i remember market traders who were still displaying and selling their product in pounds and ounces were threatened with heavy fines if they did not change to Kilos. I remember saying to my better half how can they do that when we buy petrol by the litre and yet all the road signs are in miles, i said if it was me that my argument would be until you change all the road signs to kilometres, costing millions i have no doubt, don't thing it would cut any ice with them though. Another case of double standards in my opinion. Although i can work in imperial and metric. 

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1 hour ago, kgg said:

. . . the British based their hundredweight on "stone weight" where a stone was 14 pounds and 8 stones was their hundredweight at 112 pounds . . . 

From mid-medieval period the weights and measures were set down by Edward 1st and Edward III

The British Ton is based on the wine barrel the Tun. The odd weight is 2000lb plus 240lb for the barrel weight. And this carries on down; the hundred-weight is 100lb plus 12 lb for the barrel =112lb

Ships were measured as to how many Tuns of wine barrels they could fit in their cargo hold thus a 150 Ton/Tun ship actually does does not weigh that

Edited by fredk

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1 hour ago, jcuk said:

A good few years ago i remember market traders who were still displaying and selling their product in pounds and ounces were threatened with heavy fines if they did not change to Kilos. . . . 

That was true but it was cleared up many years ago with law. Fresh foods may be sold either in Imperial or metric measures. Its up to the vendor to choose. Most price their foods for both

Edited by fredk

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So, instead of using 6-7 oz leather we’re really using 0.17 - 0.198 kilogram leather? :wacko:

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:blink:  :lol:

 

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1 hour ago, bladegrinder said:

So, instead of using 6-7 oz leather we’re really using 0.17 - 0.198 kilogram leather? :wacko:

I'm thinking we should just measure everything in fractions of astronomical units.

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1 hour ago, bladegrinder said:

So, instead of using 6-7 oz leather we’re really using 0.17 - 0.198 kilogram leather? :wacko:

This side of the pond we measure the size of the leather in feet and then measure the weight millimetres confusing for some. Although have noticed some suppliers are now giving the size in feet but also will also give the size metric too.

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14 hours ago, fredk said:

From mid-medieval period the weights and measures were set down by Edward 1st and Edward III

The British Ton is based on the wine barrel the Tun. The odd weight is 2000lb plus 240lb for the barrel weight. And this carries on down; the hundred-weight is 100lb plus 12 lb for the barrel =112lb

Ships were measured as to how many Tuns of wine barrels they could fit in their cargo hold thus a 150 Ton/Tun ship actually does does not weigh that

That's interesting and makes sense. It's interesting how measurements came about.

kgg

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Inches, foot and yard are interesting

Edward 1st was regulating measurements. 

On your fingers the first section, from knuckle to the first joint, was called a hinch. Eddy ruled that the hinch of his finger was the standard measurement to be used. And 12 hinches was the length of his foot, thus it was the be the standard. To be used during his lifetime. The h was soon dropped as it was a nearly silent letter. You'll find your hinch more or less equal to 1 inch

btw when the French used inches, their inch was about 1.25 inches, longer. So when they say Napoleon was short at 56 inches tall thats French inches which is actually 70 inches which is 5 ft 10, not short at all (proven)

You often see the medieval longbow arrow called cloth-yard shaft long. Edward 1st was constantly at war. When he took up using Welsh long bow archers he found there was great variation in the length of supplied arrows. The width of the standard weaving loom at the time worked out at 34 to 37 inches wide. In setting his standards the looms were to be 36 inches wide, thus it was ruled the supplied arrow shafts were to be no less than the width of a cloth loom. Commercial weavers worked together in a weaving yard. As usual everything got contracted and simplified

Next lesson will be . . . . 

Edited by fredk

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And the cloth yard was the distance from the end of Edward's nose to the tip of his thumb, when he was standing with his arm stretched out perpendicular to the ground and at a right angle to his body! 

I remember that from grade school! :rolleyes:  Edit: okay it was King Henry I , not Edward: https://www.splashlearn.com/math-vocabulary/measurements/yard#:~:text=A yard was originally the,yards between the goal lines.

Edited by Sheilajeanne

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