Johanna

Instruction sheet from a John Henry holster workshop

Recommended Posts

John Henry typed this on a typewriter for a handout because we were doing so many holster classes in Macon. (In Georgia, they like their guns!) I scanned the pages, used some OCR software and have bleeding eyes from the editing- so blame any typos on me. I'm interested to know if you folks do about the same as he did, or what you do differently? Is there anything you like about this, or disagree with? I'm asking because I have dozens of workshops like this from our archives, and if y'all really want to see them, I will post them. I tried to clean up the formatting some, but he always was a meticulous outliner. Looking through all this other stuff of his tonight was bittersweet because I miss him, and it's almost the anniversary of when he died, six years ago. Here it is, Artifax Custom Leather's Holster Making Workshop.

Holster Workshop

by John Henry

(written perhaps 1997?) Macon, Ga. Artifax Custom Leather

Georgia Leathercrafters' Guild

Materials Required:

Leather

Contact Cement

Mallet

Sinew

2 - 3/0 Harness NeedIes

Chisel

Wing Dividers

Super Shears

Dot Snaps

Pencil

Setter

Skiving Knife or X-acto

Two General Misconceptions.Heavy Leather No need for 9/1 0 oz. leather since the weight of the pistol is suspended from belt. The holster is only to make a pocket to accomplish this suspension. Using the equivalent of 6/8 oz. leather~ including the lining if one is used.

Lining Holsters - These give the holster a more finished appearance since the inside is smoother. The lining is only a cosmetic treatment. Over the years I have come to some of my own conclusions about lining leathers.

This should be avoided because the nap of the suede that makes it feel so rich increases its surface area, so it is more susceptible to absorbing moisture from the air. This can have two basic effects:

1.) Moisture can increase possibility of rust.

2.) Moisture can trap dust and sand which will act as a fine abrasive against the pistol's metal, similar to a very fine emery cloth.

Chrome tanned leather- Chromium salts used in the tanning process can and do react with the bluing agents used on firearms, causing the appearance of surface rust. These should be avoided.

1.) Most garment type leathers, including suedes, are chrome tanned. These can usually be identified by a gray colored "core" area of the leather that will show in a cut area, if the leather is heavy enough for it to be easily seen. Vegetable Tanned Leather This is the only leather that I've found suitable for linings because it doesn't appear to have the dust retention on suedes, or the chemical reaction of chrome tanned. Vegetable tanned leather is made to accept moisture readily, but this is halted by proper sealing of the surface. I use Leather Balm or Carnuba Creme for this.

Often I don't even line the holster. If the leather that I'm using has a fine flesh side, I just use water to burnish this well, after dyeing, to give the interior a smooth, glossy look.

End Plugs These are pieces sewn into the muzzle end of a holster to close it. I don't generally

use them because they can hold debris and moisture.

Leather Selection.

A.) First decide if the holster is to be lined or not. This will determine how finely grained the flesh side of the leather needs to be.

1.) If lined, the nap isn't too important, but be sure that the section of the piece that you wiII use is blemish free; no slices or thin spots.

2.) If unlined~ choose a piece that has the tightest nap that you can find in addition to minimal blemishes.

B.) If the holster is to be lined, choose the lining and leather at the same time so that you can be sure to get pieces that will total the desired weight when laminated. If, for example, you want 8 oz. leather, either get a piece of 4 oz. that's twice the size you need, or a nice 6 oz. and a 2 oz. like calf. Be sure that both pieces are as blemish free as possible in the area that you'll be using.

Pattern Making

A.) The first step in pattern making, and one that should be repeated frequently during all stages of preparation and fabrication, is to carefully make sure that the pistol is unloaded and the action is clear of rounds. This part can not be over-emphasized. Don't trust any one else during your inspection.

B.) After insuring that the weapon is not loaded, take a large piece of brown paper, either shipping paper or a grocery bag, and fold it lengthwise down the center. You need to have a clean, crisp fold. After the crease is made, open the paper flat with the crease running away from you on the table.

C.) Position the pistol with the bore pointing away from you for extra safety in such a manner so that the front sight blade is resting squarely in the crease that you made. Then you should center the notch in the rear sight and the center of the hammer (if one is exposed) on the crease as well.

From here on the directions are for a right hand holster. For a left hand model, reverse the directions.

D.) Carefully so you don't let the pistol move, lay it over to the left. While holding the pencil perfectly perpendicular to the paper, trace around the pistol from the end of the bore nearest the crease, along the barrel and trigger guard, grip, hammer, and back to the frame at the rear sight.

1.) While at this point, mark the top of the rear sight by a horizontal line drawn parallel to the crease and another from the line marking the end of the barrel across the crease.

2.) Move the pistol off off the paper and put it in a safe place. Then, before going any further,

label the pattern RIGHT HANDED with make and model of pistol, including any

information such as barrel length, frame type, sight or trigger modifications, etc.

3.) Trace in the outline of the holster, using points 3/4" away from the trigger guard and muzzle end of the barrel as start and end points. For the top of the holster, sketch in the cut line to expose as much of the trigger as you like and coming back up over the body of the pistol to the mark that you made for the rear sight.

E.) Carefully cut out only the section that you have sketched for the holster.

F.) Fold pattern in half: then carefully draw a line 3/4" away from and parallel to the crease. Then trace around the edge of the holster from the crease near the muzzle up to the top of the trigger guard. From the point at the top of the trigger guard, extend a line straight up the paper that is parallel to the line drawn near the crease.

G.) By now you should have the rough pattern cut out and ready to check the fit around the pistol and to set the belt loop. After checking once again that the pistol is not loaded, fit the pattern around the pistol to check fit.

1.) If satisfied with the fit, carefully hold the pistol against your hip and feed the extra paper of the belt loop under your belt.

2.) Adjust the holster so that the pistol is positioned where you want to carry it and at the angle you want it to hang. Once you have this, pull the paper belt loop snug against your belt and make pencil marks at the top of the fold over the belt and trace the holster pattern onto the

loop paper where ever it can be done. This should give you an idea of the hang of the loop and how much leather you need to remove to get it to hang the way that you want.

H.) Store pistol and lay pattern back on table with belt loop extended. Draw and label a line for the fold at the top of the belt, then sketch in the shape of the belt loop.

1.) I usually leave 2 1/2" to 3" for the loop. I measure this in fom the fold side of the holster, then swing a nice smooth arc from the point at the top of the trigger guard to the top of the fold over the belt.

2.) To layout the pointed end of the belt loop, I usually measure 3/4" to 1" below the bottom of the belt at the center of the loop and make a mark. Then 1 swing an arc from what would be the bottom of my belt to this point.

3.) Once these lines are all sketched in, trim the pattern.

L. This is the point where you have to make layout marks for a safety strap. There are three different types:

a.) Trigger Strap. Travels over the top of the trigger guard to the holster body. Is usually stitched or riveted to the back of the holster in the belt loop, fed through a slot punched above the trigger guard and fastened to a snap on the body of the holster just below the trigger guard.

b.) Hammer Strap. Goes between the hammer and the frame to the holster. Is usually stitched or riveted on the rear of the holster inside the belt loop, just between the hammer and the frame, then runs around the front, behind the hammer, and is fastened with a snap set just below the trigger guard.

c.) Hammer Loop A slit leather tab that loops over the hammer. I don't recommend this type from a safety standpoint, but may be required for a period type piece.

There are two different styles for the strap types.

Solid A single unbroken strap from the area of the belt loop to the snap on the body of the holster.

Thumb Break. A two piece strap joined by a snap set between the area of the belt loop and the holster body set in such a fashion that the thumb can be used to break the snap as the hand reaches for the pistol.

Dependent upon which type of safety strap you decide, mark the areas of the pattern where these will be sewn, threaded, and. snapped.

ASSEMBLY

I.) Lay pattern on top of Ieather so that the "front" of the pattern (the side that you labeled is on the flesh side of the leather. Trace around the pattern with a pencil or chalk.

a,) If you are going to line the holster. place the pattern so that the "front" of the pattern is on the grain side. You want this piece to be reversed so that the holster and liner can be cemented flesh side to flesh side.

b.) Mark any places where you will need to punch holes for hardware. I use an awl or needle to pierce these points then fit the line and holster together to be sure the spots match. If they match, punch them.

2,) Cut out the parts, being careful to stay outside of pattern marks. With luck and skill, you should have a slight amount of extra room. This can be trimmed off after assembly, just before burnishing the edges. By allowing this slight extra allowance then trimming it away you should be able to eliminate or minimize any holes in the edge caused by inexact fit of the edges.

3.) The filler is used to insure that the holster stays spread open in the trigger area to prevent binding and rubbing on the trigger and or guard. It also prevents the holster leather from being stretched during molding, which could weaken it in this area. If you are going to use a filler around the trigger guard, now is the time to cut one.

1.) The filler should be the same thickness as the trigger guar,or at best, just slightly thinner. It should run from the high point of the holster in this area to where the holster begins to taper toward the barrel, just forward of the trigger guard. You should cut these strips about 3/4" wide and long enough so that you will have enough of them to laminate together to have the proper thickness.

2.) The filler should be skived to a near feather edge from near the center of its length to the bottom edge where it lays under the frame.

3.) I usually add a little extra to the top of the filler (above the point of the trigger guard area) to give me room to adjust fit and trim clean after assembly.

a.) Cut strips to desired length, then scuff the grain side giving a better gripping surface

for the cement. Laminate the pieces and lay them aside to set.

4.) If holster is to be carved or stamped, do it now. Be sure to tape the back with masking or duct tape to minimize stretching during tooling. 5.) Set hardware. If the holster is to be lined, laminate the holster to the liner, weight it down and put it aside to set.

7.) Check fit of holster around pistol.- Make any adjustments necessary now.

a.) Mark your stitching line with the wing dividers.

1.) If you used a lining, this stitch line should be marked the whole way around the project to secure the lining.

b.) Use the thonging chisel to cut your stitching holes in the holster and the filler.

c.) Cement in filler.

8.) Dye the project

a.) if Iined with vegetable tanned leather, dye and finish the liner.

b.) If unlined, dampen the inside of the holster and use a piece of heavy scrap that you have molded into a sanding block to burnish the flesh side. Remember, as with all burnishing it doesn't require pressure but speed to build up the required friction to burnish properly.

9.) Stitch together using saddle stitch.

a.) If lined, I start at the bottom of the front near where the holster bottom starts to run horizontal. I stitch the lining and holster together and continue around to where I start to stitch the back and front together, then continue up to the point above the trigger guard. From there I continue to stitch the lining and holster together around the front, continuing around the belt loop and closing off the stitching when I return to the point above the trigger guard.

10) After stitching, use a sharp knife to trim the edges even. If necessary, you can touch them up with sand paper to be sure that they are smooth and flush.

11.) Bevel the edges. Dress them for burnishing in the manner of your choice (ie. Edge Coat, Gum Tragacanth). I prefer water.

12.) Burnish the edges until they look hard and shiny. If trimmed and burnished propedy the seam where the pieces join should be nearly invisible,

13.) Wrap the pistol in several layers of plastic wrap, wet the holster and push the pistol in. Work the damp leather around the contours of the pistol then set it aside to dry.

14.) After completely dry, remove the pistol and condition the leather with your favorite conditioner.

Johanna & John L. Henry Jr. Macon GA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ms Johanna

Tho it might be hard on you, I for one would luv to see any workshops you have available. On the holster issue, I have difficulty placing the angle for a thumb break on a new weapon. Just can't seem to get it quite right the first time.

Just remember

Keep on smilin

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

personally, i think it covers all of it. of course, it will depend on what youre going to build and how one want the holsters.

fyi. there are some good books out there too. i made my first holster using Stohlmans book. It more or less covers what you have posted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, Jim, just remember, you asked for it! :) I've got a bunch of them in a looseleaf folder. I'm counting on the members here to help me make the necessary additions and corrections so that I'm not spreading bad leatherworking info on the Internet. Help me out, guys!

Johanna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Johanna,

I would like to see more workshops like this.

As far as traditional holster building what John has recorded is excellent. If we couple his instructions with the photos in the Stohlman book on holsters, we have a good explanation of how to build that type of holster. (I will comment on firearms safety and holster design in addition to what John has said below. He makes it clear that we should live by the four rules.)

As far as wet molding, I approach that like any other project casing. Let the holster dry until it begins to show signs of surface drying. At that point insert the gun into the holster and then mold and bone in any details you want. I use real guns when I build holsters, sometimes my customer's guns (with their permission), and I do not wrap the gun in plastic or heavily oil it. I want it bone dry. A blue gun will leave black marks - that's a given - so advise your customer of that. It'll get those marks and more with short use. As far as casing, most people work the leather way too wet. If you work it too wet you do not get a glove tight fit and the gun gets all wet besides. A new holster should require break in. From the very first presentation it begins to wear out and there is nothing you can do about that. It's just fact. In my limited experience I have concluded most folks continue to use their holster long after its servicable life. When it gets to the point that the gun shifts around in the holster, just minutely, it is done and should be retired. As far as how wetness (casing): if you wait for "proper" casing the gun will be dry when you remove after molding and simply wiping it off with a clean cloth is all that's required. (If finished then oil it lightly if that's your fancy.) Once you are finished with the molding, then immediately remove the gun from the holster and let it dry. I do not force dry, but you can. Some use hairdryers and some use ovens. I just lay the holster aside and in front of a fan and dry it au naturale ;) If I want retention built in, then I gently squeeze the holster back into the same shape it was before I pulled the gun from it. If you wrap the holster in plastic you will end up with that much added tolerance. I don't wrap them and my guns have never rusted. As far as finish wear - that's a given. If you do not want the finish to wear then don't put the gun in a leather holster - lock it away in your safe. If I get my guns wet, I have fallen into water more than once, I just pull them down completely and dry the off with a soft cotton rag and then lubricate them as per the manufacturer's suggestions. ... now to Jim's question ...

Jim,

I'm fond of making test samples (prototypes) from heavy poster board. It 'stiff and more closely resembles leather than paper does. You can glue it or tape it or even stitch it or all three. When I measure incorrectly and cut "more short" than "more long" (Bruce is ROTF) I just tape a piece of scrap back on and cut again. Like ol' Norm Abrams tells us "measure twice, cut once." After you get it laid out make a nice finished pattern but don't be too quick to trash the tape-up. I use blue painter's masking tape because it's easy to tear and work with, and most of all it does not leave residual glue behind. When I reach the time for a test drive I use that hundred-mile-an-hour tape the U.S. Air Force is so fond of and I actually strap it on and wear it for several hours at the very least. Regardless, I sometimes end up making a leather prototype and end up scraping that before I reach my final destination.

I would suggest that the trigger guard be covered. At the very least cover the trigger so the finger cannot be placed on the trigger when the presentation is made. If your customer puts a red racing stripe down his leg he may decide it's your fault. Stupid is as stupid does, but (s)he'll try to blame someone else. I've heard all the experts say that most folks shoot themselves while holstering (call it reholstering if you want) but that is not what I've witnessed. I have seen five people shoot themselves on my ranges, and each was upon presentation, nor holstering. I was standing within arm's reach of three of them and only yards away from the other two. Back when the old Safety Speed clamshell holsters were popular with police we had a not of personal injuries. That secret button that had to be pushed to free the handgun was just in front of the trigger and it was an invitation to negligence. "Keep your finger off the trigger ... least you beat yourself to the draw. We had over a hundred personal shootings during a 20 year span with that silly holster and none that I recall involved holstering (reholstering). 'nuff said about that, but I live by the four rules. They are literally my "lifestyle" - no exceptions.

The Four Cardinal Rules:

1. All guns are loaded. (I know four cops that were shot with "unloaded" guns ... dah!)

2. Never point the muzzle at anything you are not willing to destroy. (Period!)

3. Keep your finger off the trigger until you have made the decision to shoot.

4. Be sure of your target and beyond.

In my opinion, if you shoot yourself, especially in the middle of a gun-fight, you defeat the purpose of what you were trying to do.

As far as liners, I don't like them. The only one I had, more than 40 years ago, didn't last 6 months. Granted I'm hard on gear. Guns are nothing but tools for me. That said, "if" a customer wants it - install. Charge extra and warn them of the maladies if they insist. Liner's are dirt and debris magnets and they'll sand the finish right off the piece. In John's instructions he also mentions that it attracts moisture and it does. It's no secret that leather attracts moisture and a gun should not be forgotten or stored in a leather holster. If someone stores their gun in a leather holster, they'll soon learn they should not. OK! ... I'll get off my soap-box ... lol

I hope this makes sense. Let me know if you have questions. Maybe I can answer them.

'til later,

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bring it on Johanna, anything you print I copy. And again thanks for all the help and info.

Bill, thanks to you too. But a couple more questions if you have the time.

Do you cut straps for a thumb break with the holster or as seperate pieces.

Do you rivet snaps to the holster and how do you protect the inside. I've seen some Galco holsters that have snap backs recessed into the leather with a covering to protect the gun.

Your opinion on spring belt clips. Got a couple of folks that want spring clips instead of belt loops. Safe enough or too easy to lose the holster. These folks won't be on horses. We're southern folk not western. Want to carry a sidearm with them when they are hunting. Spring clip makes it easier to remove when getting in and out of vehicles.

Thanks

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim,

I personally wouldn't carry a holster with a spring clip. I'd make it if a customer insisted. I'm thinking IWB when I think of spring clips, is that what you mean?

I would recommend putting a leather loop(s) and use one-way (lift a dot) snaps. More than once I've seen those spring clip holsters drawn with the gun. We jokingly call them Fruit of the Loom holsters. It's embrassing enough on the range to have your holster hanging off the muzzle, not to mention drawing on a suspect. It doesn't make a good impression, except maybe in a Keystone Cop production ... lol

I would install a retention strap similar to belt loops, but using a t-nut and screw so that it could be adjusted or replaced; same as the loops. With IWBs I usually make two sets of loops, 1 1/2 and 1 3/4.

The other option is to line the holster unless the hardware can be positioned inside the scabbard so that the gun doesn't come in contact with it.

On t-nuts I install a top band and sandwich the t-nut between the top band and scabbard. Depending on thickness of leather and size and style of the gun I usually put a metal line top band. The t-nut is a good way to have adjustable and/or replaceable belt loops on an IWB as per the late Bruce Nelson's Summer Special. Bruce came up with that because of the spring clip fruit of the loom experience back in the late '60s. His Summer Special has to be the most copied holster ever.

The prongs on the t-nut may have to be trimmed. They just need to bite into the back of the top band enough so they won't spin when you tighten the screw. In the old days we used Chicago screws, but the nut will sometimes turn especially after some use. A bugle head screw, either standard or phillips that will seat just below the male side of a line 24 size snap secures that on the outside of the top band.

I going to try and attach a photo of a holster that I altered because that's all I have handy right now. I've got an order for one for a Colt SAA and I'll try and remember to make some pix when I'm building it. Hopefully with the pix all this will make sense. Hope this helps.

Bill

PS - I cut that slot in the belt loop so he could position it over the loop in his pants; those are almost always in the wrong place. A better fix is two separate loops, but the customer is almost always right ... lol! If it ain't unsafe, do it. In my book sping clips are "unsafe"!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually there are a number of metal clips available today that are capable of holding the holster in place without coming out when drawing the gun. I even use kydex clips, along with a number of other highly respectable holster makers, on some versions of holsters. The "clips" have come a long way in recent years and offer a viable alternative to carrying a holster. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the input guys. All help and suggestions are appreciated.

The springclips I've been looking at are actually from Tandy. There is an offset at the bottom of the clip to prevent it from sliding up the belt without pulling out from the side. I've made some calculator/pocket computer cases and tool cases that use them and they seem to work well. Takes a little effort to remove them. Just asking for guidance from the more experienced.

Again thanks

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent info. I was just fixing to post a question about what type of leather touse for the lining of a holster. Never thought about some types reacting with the bluing. I'm glad I saw this. Another item I was curious about, was what type would be less likely to prematurely wear the bluing off, I guess less fiction. Once again great post and thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jim,

Spring Clips are not the greatest attachment method, even for IWB. Adrenaline will overcome most "clip on" attachment systems. I have personal experience on this one. I was the suprise target of an armed robbery where I brought out a fully holstered .45 Gold Cup. I had to use it as a club (damned effective but I'm sure the adrenaline was the real weapon). I don't think there is any clip system that is adequate for carry purposes other than the locking clip system for the molle gear like the Bianchi service holsters. Either sew it on or get one way snaps from DOT (Scovill).

That being said, this might work with a belt that filled the clip:

http://www.theclip.com/store/product.php?p...47&cat=0&page=1

Also if you sew or have a loop or slots, you can get the weapon closer into the body which is a plus for concealed carry.

Art

Thanks for the input guys. All help and suggestions are appreciated.

The springclips I've been looking at are actually from Tandy. There is an offset at the bottom of the clip to prevent it from sliding up the belt without pulling out from the side. I've made some calculator/pocket computer cases and tool cases that use them and they seem to work well. Takes a little effort to remove them. Just asking for guidance from the more experienced.

Again thanks

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use horsehide a lot but have used veg tan and haircell printed chrome tan with no problems. I have found nothing that will prevent wear on the blueing, if it worrys you get stainless although that will burndish in wear areas with time. If you carry and use (even for practice), wear will occur, if that bothers you, leave it in the box.

Art

Excellent info. I was just fixing to post a question about what type of leather touse for the lining of a holster. Never thought about some types reacting with the bluing. I'm glad I saw this. Another item I was curious about, was what type would be less likely to prematurely wear the bluing off, I guess less fiction. Once again great post and thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Art, you're right, if worried about wear, leave it in the box, however with the collectors value of some handguns, one tries to keep wear to a min. I have a 6" blue Colt Python my wife paid $379.00 for, check that price today for a used one, new no longer available. Thanks again for all the great ideas. I have holsters from Safariland and Bianchi, but like to have something I made myself, plus have a project to work on with the grandson. tlowry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

once the leather is prepaired oiling it would be both benificial to the leather from wearing and to the weapon to help prevent it from wear right? or would it do the oposite?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oiling is beneficial to the leather, like once or twice a year, overoiling will destroy the leather. When the wepon touches the leather and then you move around, you will wear the gun. If you had a film of oil it might offer some protection, however the leather will soak this up. If you could maintain a film of oil, the wepon would not be retained well by the leather which is the whole point. If I have to take the wepon out of the holster, I am more concerned about it working than how it looks, a little holster wear is inevitable.

Art

once the leather is prepaired oiling it would be both benificial to the leather from wearing and to the weapon to help prevent it from wear right? or would it do the oposite?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Tut is agood one I did notice a typo at the begining under veg tan paragraph..I think the word should be "Carnauba" cream,Thanks for sharing Joanna...Your the best!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would leather conditoner go thru Resolene?

SkipJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Ms. Johanna, whatever you put on here I print as well. I appreciate you sharing it with us.

Greetings from Round Rock, Texas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Joanna your the best! I just got off the phone W/Steve and I have taken the Plunge...Ordered the class 4 Cobra,3-4 week delivery, but am happy that I made the Jump,My hands will be even happier I think LOL!Art will be happy as well because I won't be bothering him with Questions Thanks Everyone for the thoughtful help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

guys

just want to say instead of oiling the holster use beeswax instead

smear it on then use a hair dryer to melt it into the leather and rub it in this will also make the leather more waterproof.

wax bowl rings is a good source for bees wax and can be found in any plumbing department.

I only use new ones :thumbsup:

Edited by St8LineGunsmith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting this Johanna. I look forward to reading all you put on here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I only use new ones :thumbsup:" BBBaahhahhaah!! Haahaahah!! Good point......

Thank you Joanna. Very classy of you to post this. I have alot to learn, and that helps tons...

Edited by ryankim3612

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oiling is beneficial to the leather, like once or twice a year, overoiling will destroy the leather. When the wepon touches the leather and then you move around, you will wear the gun. If you had a film of oil it might offer some protection, however the leather will soak this up. If you could maintain a film of oil, the wepon would not be retained well by the leather which is the whole point. If I have to take the wepon out of the holster, I am more concerned about it working than how it looks, a little holster wear is inevitable.

Art

Well said. I forget where I read it but basically the quote was "Don't want wear on your firearms, don't take them out of the box!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Johanna & Leatherworker forum for your dedication to this craft. I'm just getting started & look forward to sharing some of my 'knowledge' with y'all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now