bruce johnson

Angled Basket stamping no template

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Here is another way I lay out angled baskets. Actually this is the way I do most of them now, especially for strap work. It involves no templates, and the angles may be just a bit different for the same stamp than my template method.

First off, I make a light horizontal impression to establish a stamp width mark in the corner. I exxagerated the impression a bit for illustration purposes. I set one leg on this mark, and the other end of the same leg on the base line. This is my first impression. I then use that angle, setting the next impression against the base line and lining up the leg with the previous impression. I stamp an entire horizontal row. I then line up the centers, line up the legs, and stampm another horizontal row. I am building all the way up (or down) horizontally. Again, other than some leather stretch, the impressions top and bottom aor parallel with the cut borders. They don't run up or downhill. This might be a little trickier than using a template, but it results in cleaner borders for me usually. Every so often I eyeball the top of the impression row vs. the remaining open space. If it is not parallel, I fudge the spacing a bit up or down to make it work. Check every few rows, and it can't get too far out of line. Don't change it all in one row, but crawl a little with each row and it won't be noticeable except to another stamper.

My wife had heck on straps using angle templates. She would get off a little on her angle, and was meticulous about lining the centers up. That made the weave start to run off one way or the other. I would fudge it back, and 6" later, same thing. I couldn't explain it right to her. I got this tip off Jeremiah's layout tape, and the light came on for her. Worth the price of admission right there.

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Bruce,

Thanks for taking the time to post this. Basket weave is something I've never been able to get right. I'll give this method a try.

Jason

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Thanks, Bruce - and to all who take the time to post tutuorials!

If you are using a basket weave pattern as a border, instead of an all over pattern, what is the best way to transition to go around a rounded corner - or any corner for that matter?

Crystal

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Crystal,

I do a fair amount of the basket borders too. I don't like to do the curved basket stamp going around tight corners. It gets way too spread out on the edges to look good. I treat corners a few ways. On some I run them into a corner element like a floral or oak. On others I make them "panels", and have a break for them in the corners. I am attaching a couple of things I have done recently that show what I do. Both of these are three ring binders.

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Thanks for the additional pics, Bruce. Beautiful work. I especially like your rope cans.

I will give the basket weave another go around. Tried it a while ago and got frustrated with my alignments. (Nice to know I wasn't the only one with that particular problem.) Hopefully the brain has the knowledge now, just need to train the body. Thanks!

Crystal

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Thanks Ron for the help. I have struggled with the basket weave for some time. I got it where it looks "OK" but lots of work to go with it. I kept your instructions and I'll practice with this....just maybe. lol Your work really looks nice.

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First off, I make a light horizontal impression to establish a stamp width mark in the corner. I exxagerated the impression a bit for illustration purposes. I set one leg on this mark, and the other end of the same leg on the base line. This is my first impression. I then use that angle, setting the next impression against the base line and lining up the leg with the previous impression. I stamp an entire horizontal row.

I don't remember where I heard this little tip, but many stamps are not EXACTLY symmetric so a paint dot one one side of the basket weave stamp should always be positioned towards the same end of the stamping. Try it and see if it makes a difference for you.

Bob Stelmack

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I agree with you Bob. It's probably why when I do basketweave, I've got to first try on a piece of scrap 'cause if I use the wrong side, I can't get the impressions aligned. If I turn the tool to use the other side, everything's properly aligned, no sweat.

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I wonder if thats what I am dealing with.. Thanks Bob, I'll do that Not all the tools are perfect so that makes perfect sense. After all......... It can't be me hahahahaha

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Bruce ,

Or anyone that has constuctive input on the use of a basket stamp on a center line , with the angles going in opposit directions , that forms a a sharp point where the two converge. Often seen on horn caps, cantel seats, and cantel backs.How do you find the correct angle for the stamp, Since there are so many sizes of basketstamp?

Thank You,

Steve

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Steve,

That angle is determined by the stamp impression or your style in either method. The angle off the centerline is the same as the template angle. I have a tutorial on making that template up in the "stamping" section under the topic of "angled basket stamping and making a template". Be aware that the amount of overlap you use will make a steeper angle if you overlap more, or lesser angle if you overlap less. You can't just go by someone saying that particular stamp , say the Tandy #511 has 37 degree angle. They may not overlap the same as you. You need to make up a template based on your stamping style.

You can also consider the centerline to be the baseline, and use the "no template" method to determine the proper stamp angle.

A tip on stamping the "arrowhead" pattern. If the legs of the baskets come up a little short and don't meet flush at the point, or they are a little off - here's the fix. A thin bladed slotted screwdriver the same thickness of the basket stamp leg can be used to clean that up or connect the points. Just tap the handle end lightly like a stamp.

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Just want to say thank you. I have never been able to figure out the spacing to use the basket weave tool. This helped.

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Good job on the tutorial Bruce. The technique is simple to learn and produces a very nice result!!

:You_Rock_Emoticon:

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thanks for the post!

wish i could have found this place sooner. there is so many good ideas and cool people to get help from.

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I just love this place!!! In 35+ years of stamping it never occured to me to use a screw driver, Bruce! I think I've used just about everything else, but a screw driver touched up to match the leg is a simple and practicle tip! Thank you...great tutorial! I'm headed to Home Depot to buy an assortment of screwdivers!

Happy New Year!

Bob

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Also another great example of your "wood" tecnique. Don't know how you achieve it exactly, but its cool. I always get something from your work. Thanks for sharing.

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Thank you Bruce! I think you saved my sanity! This is so simple.

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Crystal,

I do a fair amount of the basket borders too. I don't like to do the curved basket stamp going around tight corners. It gets way too spread out on the edges to look good. I treat corners a few ways. On some I run them into a corner element like a floral or oak. On others I make them "panels", and have a break for them in the corners. I am attaching a couple of things I have done recently that show what I do. Both of these are three ring binders.

Bruce:

Got a question. The book on the left....what color did you use and where do you get your fonts?

appreciate it.

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The guest book has the Museum logo on the front. It came from a graphic designer and I am not sure what font it is. I am pretty font challenged and use the ones in the Baird book, some of the TLF books, Hidecrafters lettrering pattern pack, and whatever came loaded on my computer. The color is just NF oil and Siegel's oak side leather. I dyed the lettering with black Sharpies.

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The guest book has the Museum logo on the front. It came from a graphic designer and I am not sure what font it is. I am pretty font challenged and use the ones in the Baird book, some of the TLF books, Hidecrafters lettrering pattern pack, and whatever came loaded on my computer. The color is just NF oil and Siegel's oak side leather. I dyed the lettering with black Sharpies.

Thanks.

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Thanks for posting this Bruce.

Great stuff!

ken

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good tutorial. just on a added note, when I do basket stamps, I usually take packing tape or masking tape(the blue painters tape works great) and tape across the back of the piece horizontal and then vertical, making sure to overlap the tape by about 1/3 to 1/2 way the width of the tape.this helps with keeping the leather from distorting while stamping.ive heard of other people glueing cereal box cardboard to the back also. also, when I I stamp, I first use a scratch awl and a ruler to score a small line across the piece I am working on at the same angle i want the stamp to go.then I start in one corner and stagger the stamp. this means I stamp on 1 side of the line, then on the other remembering to overlap the stamp.I always make sure to keep the stamp on the side of the line that is away from me, so i can see what my spacing is doing.hope this helps. if need be, I can post a couple pics. just let me know.

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Edited by Duke

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I know this is an old thread but still of great help to a novice like me. Just finished my 1st attempt at arrowhead basketweave. Wish I had read this little tip first! Such a simple but wonderful idea! I actually "camouflaged" my center with large seeder stamp.Gotta say once again I love this site! So much knowledge & so many great ideas

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Black sharpies... when I was 1st shown that by my friend Kyle, owner of Circle M Saddle Shop in Prescott, KS I laughed for days. Now I have a large supply of them for use myself! Thanks Bruce! Thanks Kyle! Also have been experimenting with paint markers I found in the craft section at WalMart. They're about $2 apiece, come in all basic colors, & last a long time. I've been using them on some of my edges, which I afterwards wax & hand rub.

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