Sign in to follow this  
Skald

Holes For Buckle Prongs In Dog Collar?

Recommended Posts

I am about to make some dog collars, the wide model (about 2"), with a double prong roller buckle. I have solved most parts for the design, however not the holes for the prongs or what you call them over there.

At first I thought about using some eyelets/grommets for the holes, but I get the feel that it's a thing that won't last and stand the pressure in the extent.

I could of course just punch some simple hole and be glad with it, but this is meant to be made of two layers of leather, and even though I'll cement them together, I fear that they'll split sooner or later, and that the prongs might be prone to stick in between the two layers of leather instead of going through as they should.

So, they question is: How do I do it? I think about just lowering some stitch line around the hole, and simply stitch around it, some mm outside the hole, to avoid the two layers to split, is that a good idea? I think I have seen horse gear made that way. Any opinions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am about to make some dog collars, the wide model (about 2"), with a double prong roller buckle. I have solved most parts for the design, however not the holes for the prongs or what you call them over there.

At first I thought about using some eyelets/grommets for the holes, but I get the feel that it's a thing that won't last and stand the pressure in the extent.

I could of course just punch some simple hole and be glad with it, but this is meant to be made of two layers of leather, and even though I'll cement them together, I fear that they'll split sooner or later, and that the prongs might be prone to stick in between the two layers of leather instead of going through as they should.

So, they question is: How do I do it? I think about just lowering some stitch line around the hole, and simply stitch around it, some mm outside the hole, to avoid the two layers to split, is that a good idea? I think I have seen horse gear made that way. Any opinions?

I have never had the problem that you are afraid of...if the 2 plys are properly cemented together they are not gonna split. But if you really want to make sure (it's gonna be more of an "overkill" though) you can do a stitch down the center of the collar in between the holes...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never had the problem that you are afraid of...if the 2 plys are properly cemented together they are not gonna split. But if you really want to make sure (it's gonna be more of an "overkill" though) you can do a stitch down the center of the collar in between the holes...

Overkill is my middle name. ;)

What sort of cement (preferably brand name) would you suggest for this use? I have understood that there are like two different kinds, one that can be torn apart pretty easy, and one that really makes it stick together. I'll of course stitch the two layers together, but I think of the middle in between the stitches so to say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Overkill is my middle name. ;)

What sort of cement (preferably brand name) would you suggest for this use? I have understood that there are like two different kinds, one that can be torn apart pretty easy, and one that really makes it stick together. I'll of course stitch the two layers together, but I think of the middle in between the stitches so to say.

This is a detailed pics of a collar i made using a 2 prong buckle.The collar is made out of 2 ply of 8-9oz glued together with permanent contact cement

Stitching down the middle , in between the 2 rows the holes will take care of your worries.

14338_179231341318_705191318_3383221_3996705_n.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a detailed pics of a collar i made using a 2 prong buckle.The collar is made out of 2 ply of 8-9oz glued together with permanent contact cement

Stitching down the middle , in between the 2 rows the holes will take care of your worries.

Looks really nice.

The cement in question is probably the kind that for example Tandy sells under the name "Tanners Bond Contact Cement", right? Fiebing's has a "Leathercraft cement" too, and I usually find Fiebing's stuff to be among the best. So I'll probably stick to that I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks really nice.

The cement in question is probably the kind that for example Tandy sells under the name "Tanners Bond Contact Cement", right? Fiebing's has a "Leathercraft cement" too, and I usually find Fiebing's stuff to be among the best. So I'll probably stick to that I guess.

There is another glue that you can get fromthe hardware stores...the only problem is the smell...you have to work in a very well ventilated area...when i use that glue i am actually outside. It's probablt the strongest i ever used.It's a multi purpuse type of glue...you have to look on the back and read the description

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is another glue that you can get fromthe hardware stores...the only problem is the smell...you have to work in a very well ventilated area...when i use that glue i am actually outside. It's probablt the strongest i ever used.It's a multi purpuse type of glue...you have to look on the back and read the description

Does this glue have any sort of brand name, or product type name? ;) Does it stiff leather up? Most cements claim they don't, and as I will use kind of thick leather, it would be good if it didn't stiff it up all too much.

I am used to dealing with not so healthy fumes from casting brass and so forth, so ventilation awareness isn't a problem really, but thank you for pointing that out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this