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frasermade

Speed Reducer Pulley In The Uk

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Hi all -

I've just recently acquired an Adler 167 and will soon be putting a servo on it. I have been searching high and low to find info on making my own speed reduction pulley but can't, for the life of me, find a layman's instructional to do it.

I know I need a certain ration 1:3, I know I need bearings and another belt, but I can't find anything on where to get pulleys, bearings and belts in the UK.

Any assistance is greatly appreciated,

Best

Gordon

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Try Hartley sewing machines in Walsall 01922 721136 he's a really nice guy.

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It's not easy to find speed reducers for sale in Europe. Perhaps Andreas in Sieck.de have some for sale still. I bought some of him before and they where reasonably priced. I have had both Adler 67 and 167. Currently I have the Durkopp Adler 267-373 with an Efka DC 1600. With a new 600 to 750 watt servo motor you do not need any reducer on that machine. A reducer on top of the new strong servo motors will be to much for that machine, it will simply be to strong. That's the setup we use on the heavy stitchers like the 441 and 205-370 machines. I installed a reducer and a 600 watt cobra servo on my Pfaff 345 H3, a similar machine to the 167 but with a cylinder bed (I had a reducer laying around). Now I want to take it off again. The setup is way to much for the machine and easily knocks it out of timing if accident happens. The Pfaff has no safety clutch, your 167 normally has one. Nevertheless, a reducer will be a waist of time and money. Use you money to buy a good motor instead. https://www.college-sewing.co.uk/Industrial-Sewing-Machine-Motors sell many good motors. The best deal will be a Ho Hsing G60 needle position servo motor to about 160 £.(it's not displayed on their site) http://leatherworker.net/forum/index.php?showtopic=65042 that's a Japanese professional motor that is more than strong enough for your machine without any reducer. That's a Japanese motor to a Chinese price :)

It has needle position, needle always stops down position. Heeling the pedal brings it in correct top position. You can go stitch by stitch and motor have great low speed control. It's a labor saving solution. I currently have such motors on two of my machines, and could not do without them.

Good luck.

Tor

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I have just bought a servo motor and needle adjustment from College, and wish I'd done it ages ago. No need for a speed reducer, or change of pulley, at least for me.

Single stitch now possible, and easy to control.

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Thanks all - I'm going to get a servo (JK-563A-1 220V 750W 1 HP SERVO MOTOR WITH NEEDLE POSITION) from College-Sewing. It looks to be the best one and I've seen a few on youtube.

All I'm looking for is like 1-3 stitches per second. I'm such a new-hat at this that the clutch motor is making me mad.

I take it this motor will give me what I'm after?

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I also have two JACK servos from College Sewing in the UK, both 750Watts and both have added a speed reducer. One is for my 133K3 and on the other one I have a Singer 111. Maybe overpowered for the 111 but it will only kick the safety clutch when you hit something really hard at higher speed so thats not an issue for me since I´m sewing quite slow (and it never happened). If you need a needle positioner the Jack servos do not work with an added speed reducer. I have no experience with the Ho Hsing G60 but sounds like a good one.

I think it doesn`t matter if a 750Watts or 550Watts Servo or 370Watts clutch motor kicks off the clutch when you hit a hard spot. The resistance of the clutch is always the same. I´d say thats what the safety clutch is meant for.

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Mine is the Jack 563A-1, and the only problem I've found is getting used to the silence after a clutch motor.

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I recommend the Ho Hsing G60. You get that for the same price. It has a needle position system that works. It's also possible to build on a system control box on it later. Then you can add all kinds of equipment like pneumatic footlift etc. Together with Efka, Ho Hsing is world leader on sewing motors. And a motor that the Chinese copies allot. It's torgue and lowspeed control it's all about. Watt is a measurement on full speed. Why buy a copy when you can get the real thing for the same price? And with support. Does the needle position work on the Chinese motors, sometimes perhaps? Just a question. That's what they struggle to get right.

I use Efka, but when I need a new reasonable priced motor I will buy the G60, it's half the price in the UK, here its twice as expensive. I have tested it and it works great.

Tor

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I recommend the Ho Hsing G60. You get that for the same price. It has a needle position system that works. It's also possible to build on a system control box on it later. Then you can add all kinds of equipment like pneumatic footlift etc. Together with Efka, Ho Hsing is world leader on sewing motors. And a motor that the Chinese copies allot. It's torgue and lowspeed control it's all about. Watt is a measurement on full speed. Why buy a copy when you can get the real thing for the same price? And with support. Does the needle position work on the Chinese motors, sometimes perhaps? Just a question. That's what they struggle to get right.

I use Efka, but when I need a new reasonable priced motor I will buy the G60, it's half the price in the UK, here its twice as expensive. I have tested it and it works great.

Tor

Thanks for the input Tor

Do you have a UK supplier of the Ho Hsing?

Cheers

Gordon

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Thanks for the input Tor

Do you have a UK supplier of the Ho Hsing?

Cheers

Gordon

Yes, College https://www.college-sewing.co.uk/ have it. Buts not displayed on their site. That's where my friend bought his, see the link in my post #3

Tor

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Hi guys, can anyone help me with this pls,

 the method of simply changing the 120mm pulley for a 45mm pulley on a clutch motor will increase or decrease torque.?

I have done this on my Seiko stw-8b machine but am currently waiting for my new belt to arrive.

I have also extended the pedal as seen on ebay and will then add a speed reducer.

Was just wondering if the first step gives me more or less torque.

thnx

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The clutch motor's torque remains constant, however the lower speed at the sewing machine results in increased torque at that point, so yes, will punch through tough items more easily.  The inertia in a clutch motor also helps punch through that first stitch.  It doesn't usually stall.

Tom

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1 hour ago, northmount said:

The clutch motor's torque remains constant, however the lower speed at the sewing machine results in increased torque at that point, so yes, will punch through tough items more easily.  The inertia in a clutch motor also helps punch through that first stitch.  It doesn't usually stall.

Tom

Ah ok great to hear.

Also when I said 'as seen on ebay' I actually meant on youtube. The guy added a metal bar, extending the clutch lever to 'lengthen' and soften the pedal motion.

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On 01/11/2016 at 10:56 PM, Sticks said:

Ah ok great to hear.

Also when I said 'as seen on ebay' I actually meant on youtube. The guy added a metal bar, extending the clutch lever to 'lengthen' and soften the pedal motion.

Guessing that was Cechaflo? He showed in another video how to change the reducer pulley too. I don't have a lever at all, my pitman goes straight from the side of the motor direct to the pedal, as it's an original Singer motor. I'm loathe to change it, as it matches the machine, and is fairly quiet too, so am very much hoping the pulleys will do the trick by themselves.

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The torque of the motor is constant because it has that characteristics and it runs on full speed all the time, but when you put a smaller pulley on it it will be weaker on the output; it will do more work. Changing from a big 120 to a small 48 mm pulley will give you less speed, this is just like riding a bike and change gears. To improve both torque and low speed control, use a speed reducer. If you have a 3 Ph clutch motor, use frequency controller.  It will solve the problem, that if your clutch motor have enough power to start with. Minimum 550 - 600 watt and a good clutch (upholstery class). There are many ways to control a good clutch motor, but putting your right hand on the pulley to help slow it down. Taking of your shoes to get a better feel on the pedal etc. But do you have an ancient weak clutch motor to start with, change it out with something new; preferable a servo of good quality.  

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On 9/8/2015 at 0:34 AM, Trox said:

Yes, College https://www.college-sewing.co.uk/ have it. Buts not displayed on their site. That's where my friend bought his, see the link in my post #3

Tor

Well, I am hoping they still sell it....  Since my Jack servo motor is a little quick for the work I wish to do...

 

I'll update this information either way.

Cheers

Alex

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College sewing are wonderfull.   They even sent to Japan for a couple of parts for one of my sewing machines, and didn’t put the charge through until they received the parts and had popped them into the post to me.

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Hi Fraser, have you seen Harry Rogers' video on the subject? 

 

He uses two standard M pulleys, a piece of 15mm bright mild steel and a pair of 15mm pillow block bearings. All of these are available from eBay, total around £30. He found he had to drill and tap the boss of each pulley for a grub screw so they grip the shaft. If you don't want to do this you might be able to get away with hammering a wedge into each keyway slot, or maybe even glueing them in with epoxy though I think Harry's solution is the best.

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