nstarleather

Example of Fake Order, how to spot them.

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Hey Guys!  

When I first started selling online I used to try to respond to fake requests like the one I'm going to post below, but if it looks like this one it's someone trying to scam you:

Quote
I am Anthony W  king ,the Sales Representative of C & H Distributors Reno, Nevada, we are interested in doing business with your company. We have a great relationship with many companies across the globe and we do have a reasonable amount of customer network who are interested in the following:
 
1) ITEM ONE:   223F. Mini Fringe Leather Handbag
 
QUANTITY: 50 pieces, assorted colors
 
 
Do get back to me with the total cost including shipping to the below address.
101 S shepley st,apt 25 Bloomington Texas 77951
 
I would also like to know how soon they can be shipped.
 
I await your swift response.
 
Thanks,
Anthony W  king

So how do we know this one isn't legit:

1. Check the "from" email, if they mention a real company, check if they have a website.  If they do, then see if the domain is the same as the person emailing, they are  large company hey usually aren't using a gmail or hotmail account.

2. The language will look kind of off.   They usually write in a way that doesn't feel natural.

"We have a great relationship with many companies across the globe and we do have a reasonable amount of customer network"

3. The will ask for a fairly large quantity of a mid to high priced item.  And not care about the details like color.

4.They will mention how quickly they want the items (usually more than once).

I'm pasting this one as an example because it's a little less obvious than some I've gotten but you can still see the red flags. 

 

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I also receive these type emails several times a week.  Another clue that they are scammers is that the emails are often sent to multiple recipients - look at the "to" list and if it is not addressed to you alone, you know it is a scam.

Sad thing is, these scammers must be getting enough replies from unsuspecting/trusting people to continue to fish for more people to scam.  Block their email address rather than simply deleting the email, might slow them down just a little.

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It is also worthwhile to check the address on Google Maps,

in the case of 101 S shepley st,apt 25 Bloomington Texas 77951,

there is no building there.  So, where would your product go,if you shipped there?

How would they get it?

 

vacant.jpg

Edited by R SFraser Sr

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So, are they asking for money to join their network??? It's not like you're gonna ship them something without payment, right?

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Lots use a stolen card, and later you get the chargeback.

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Ohhhhh

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The phone number comes back to California PA. I guess they picked the numbers out of thin air.

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Not to mention, the company that is identified in Reno, Nevada (where I live) is not a company that deals in the type of products that we make; they are a distributor of commercial furniture and shelving/racking solutions.  Besides, if a company in Nevada was interested in doing business with you why would they ask to have anything (even information) sent to an address somewhere else?  Really!?

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Yeah, just thought to post it to show folks what these things look like.   Most I get are actually even easier to spot:

 The usually ask for more higher dollar items.  

Ask if I take credit cards.

Ask for my website and catalog(never understood why they would ask that: "we want yo place an order, please tell me what it is that you sell")

 

Lastly they usually use the word "kindly" and for bonus credit claim to be some sort of pastor or reverend.  

 

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And that questionable language is the sign of very poor translations; after all, these are primarily located overseas in regions of Asia, Russia, and Africa.  Some are so obvious that you almost look at them as a very pathetic stand-up comedy routine.  Kind of reminds you of the old "I am Prince so and so and I would like to send you some of my wealth" email scams.

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I once heard the theory that scammers purposely don't try to be too smooth in the first email because they only want people gullible enough to go through the whole process. Kind if a way to filter out the people the scam won't work on.   If a person responds to an obviously sketchy email, then they are the kind of mark that is more likely to pay out in the end.   If they write emails that sound more legit, they waste time going back and forth with someone who may figure out its a scam.  

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Yup!  Always someone out there trying to scam people and there are always those out there who don't have a clue when they are being scammed.  I just collect all of the data I can on a source (IP, names used, etc.) and provide it to the FBI for follow-up.  Have actually been contacted back a few times with a big "Thank You" as the data provided helped them with some actions against some of these types.  The age of the Internet and Social Media have opened that door wide and it will only get worse as technology controls the daily lives of those who can't live without it.

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