TomWisc

Getting a chisel scary sharp

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I just saw this video on sharpening woodworking chisels and thought some of his techniques apply to sharpening leather tools. I didn't check if someone already posted this video but I have not seen it before.

Worth the watch!

 

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Everyone develops their own techniques for sharpening, learned through various observations, lessons and experimentation. Thank you for sharing the video.

My note is not about the video, but about the title:

SCARY sharp, should not exist if you are using tools daily.

All of my blades (including axes) are really sharp andfit for purpose. The guy in the video would say scary sharp; I say properly sharp.

DO NOT TRY THIS: I am not suggeting or recommending this as a way to test blades... I can shave with all of those knives I have tried (keep the 10 in cooks knife away, as I cannot guide it around the chin without removing nose).

You cannot be scared of your blades or you will cut yourself. Get the proper tools properly sharpened for the job; too blunt they'll snag and jump - ooh bad cut there and the cut is jagged so healing's harder. Properly sharp, far less likely to snag, unless you are scared of it...

I know its semantics, but I once drove 20 minutes to a friend with a horror cut, where the tomato knife  had not cut the tomato, but had cut her hand. The ragged cut made fun cleaning and butterfly stitching, but she has just a light scar as a reminder. The knife was BLUNT so I sharpened it, and taught her how to handle sharp knives and keep them sharp... she had been worried that they were too sharp as she had kids in the house. That was a whole nother lesson.

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On 1/29/2019 at 10:44 AM, hwinbermuda said:

Everyone develops their own techniques for sharpening, learned through various observations, lessons and experimentation. Thank you for sharing the video.

My note is not about the video, but about the title:

SCARY sharp, should not exist if you are using tools daily.

All of my blades (including axes) are really sharp andfit for purpose. The guy in the video would say scary sharp; I say properly sharp.

DO NOT TRY THIS: I am not suggeting or recommending this as a way to test blades... I can shave with all of those knives I have tried (keep the 10 in cooks knife away, as I cannot guide it around the chin without removing nose).

You cannot be scared of your blades or you will cut yourself. Get the proper tools properly sharpened for the job; too blunt they'll snag and jump - ooh bad cut there and the cut is jagged so healing's harder. Properly sharp, far less likely to snag, unless you are scared of it...

I know its semantics, but I once drove 20 minutes to a friend with a horror cut, where the tomato knife  had not cut the tomato, but had cut her hand. The ragged cut made fun cleaning and butterfly stitching, but she has just a light scar as a reminder. The knife was BLUNT so I sharpened it, and taught her how to handle sharp knives and keep them sharp... she had been worried that they were too sharp as she had kids in the house. That was a whole nother lesson.

 

When I started with leathercraft I couldn't sharpen my knives, and I needed a lot of force to skive. Now I have learned how to sharpen and not only did it give me more consistent results, It also gives me more possibilities to skive at "awkward" angles.  Sometimes I hold my leather down and skive between thumb and index finger. Which would be really dangerous with a blunt knife.

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4 hours ago, Danne said:

 

When I started with leathercraft I couldn't sharpen my knives, and I needed a lot of force to skive. Now I have learned how to sharpen and not only did it give me more consistent results, It also gives me more possibilities to skive at "awkward" angles.  Sometimes I hold my leather down and skive between thumb and index finger. Which would be really dangerous with a blunt knife.

Yep, I didn't know I would have to learn to sharpen when I started in leather. Just one of the many techniques you have to aquire along the journey. 

Most of my sharpening goes to my Kalamazoo 1x 42 belt sander. It makes life so much easier. I think it cost me about 300 bucks, but it was a great investment. I'm sure it will outlast me.

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11 minutes ago, bikermutt07 said:

Yep, I didn't know I would have to learn to sharpen when I started in leather. Just one of the many techniques you have to aquire along the journey. 

Most of my sharpening goes to my Kalamazoo 1x 42 belt sander. It makes life so much easier. I think it cost me about 300 bucks, but it was a great investment. I'm sure it will outlast me.

I often hear people complaining about how hard it is to skive with consistent results. I think those people would think it's quite easy if they used a really sharp knife and skive with the bevel down. (I don't say it's the wrong way to use the flat side down, but I think most people would think it's easier with the bevel down.)

I use sandpaper for sharpening. But I plan to buy one SK11 150-600 for reshaping bevels and flattening whetstones, and two whetstones (Shapton Kuromaku 1000 and 5000) 

I just had to comment on this "I'm not paying 80 bucks for a belt!!! It's a strip of leather."  I don't think people in general understand that 80 bucks is not that much money for a belt, compared to the cheap belt for 15 bucks, which you throw in the trash after a couple of years. (split leather with a finish.)

Edited by Danne

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Thank you very much, everyone! This is worth a try.

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