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I thought someone might be interested in seeing my small Leather workshop take shape up until now I have been working in a small space in the house. My first plan was to turn the garage into a workshop but that is now going to be a utility room / laundry. So the Garden was my next option.

This is the old shed which was on the property before we moved in, It was really well built and took some removing.

45044618845_923044fe11_z.jpg2018-11-19_04-18-08 by my0771, on Flickr

This is my first plan for its replacement. Yes it is on the back of an envelope but I don't smoke anymore so did not have a fag (cigarette) packet to draw on.

31963045588_cbd2fdcd57_z.jpg2018-11-11_10-01-42 by my0771, on Flickr

This was followed by a slightly more detailed scale drawing 

30894139247_0432ca3e63_z.jpg2018-11-11_10-02-12 by my0771, on Flickr

Foundations involved digging some holes.

45308722545_15d7ba7e15_z.jpg2018-12-07_09-39-02 by my0771, on Flickr

After digging I had to fill the holes with hardcore.

46632750041_1229768df5_z.jpg2019-01-06_04-20-33 by my0771, on Flickr

The base was made of 4 concrete lintels a little unusual but it is not covered by planning or building regs.

39800493343_023fd813d6_z.jpg2019-01-16_04-13-52 by my0771, on Flickr

The first layer of wood is laid on a mortar bed with a damp proof course below

39800493343_023fd813d6_z.jpg2019-01-16_04-13-52 by my0771, on Flickr

This is very much a simple version of this build there is a more detailed post on my blog I will continue here if anyone is interested

 

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Looks like fun! I'd like to see the rest of the build.:rockon:

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Sorry the last image was missing 

46863384221_4dd16c300e_z.jpg2019-01-24_05-35-03 by my0771, on Flickr

The second piece of wood in the picture is the bottom of the wall frame and is there to help with alignment.

The next step was to lay the flooring joists on hangers.

39927406443_7fa1a4e451_z.jpg2019-01-27_11-37-37 by my0771, on Flickr

Once you have a level flat deck it is an ideal place to build the wall frames. I marked everything and cut the timber over a few days then joined all of the pieces together to form the wall frame.

31966766587_c00a2a9bdf_z.jpg2019-01-28_06-15-01 by my0771, on Flickr

The second wall frame has a window so was slightly more difficult.

46015170615_d29c48f144_z.jpg2019-01-30_04-34-51 by my0771, on Flickr

I started back in November but had a break for hand surgery which has healed nicely.

This is everything to date I have a front and back wall to make then the roof and work benches and cupboards for the inside. 

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If it gets cold or damp you may want to place some ridgid insulation between the dirt and the bottom of the floor joists.  Cheap and easy.

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Thanks @mike02130 I have lots of insulation I visited a local company to get prices for insulation for the whole workshop, It was very expensive as I was leaving I noticed a pallet of tatty looking solid insulation and rolls of loft type insulation. I went back and spoke to the foreman I explained what I was doing and that I was on a limited budget.

He walked me back to the pallets and when I asked if I could buy it he said no as it was no longer on their stock file, He then told me to take whatever I wanted and to try not to make too much mess. My garage shed and neighbours shed are full of insulation.

There is a very helpful forum UK based woodhaven2 and a guy also called Mike who has been very helpful he is an Architect the base is to his drawings including the positioning of the vents. I had planned on filling the area of soil with expanded polystyrene but he advised against it as it would stop the air from moving freely. The area between the joists is to be filled with solid insulation as you suggest.

The next installment will be posted once the weather improves. 

 

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We have had a small amount of snow recently which has slowed progress I managed a couple of hours yesterday so I was able to put the rear wall together and start assembly of the front frame. As I was yet to make the door frame it took a little longer then rain stopped work.

2019-02-05_06-48-12

I know it is a little difficult to see the frames for the wood at the moment but all will become clear once they are stood up and fastened together.

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Once I had completed the door frame and added a couple of extra studs it was time to stand the walls up and secure them to each other and the sole plate.

46092856705_9d65bb56d8_z.jpg2019-02-06_03-37-10 by my0771, on Flickr

Walls up and fixed together everything is plumb and square forecast for rain tomorrow so the weekend will see the addition of extra noggins to support the walls.

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Things are moving forward slowly I have added the upper plate and the noggins to tie everything together.

The roof is next in an ideal world however I need to use a ladder to reach even though the surrounding ground is hardcore that has been whacked (compacted) the feet of the ladder dig in. So in reality I need to do the floor next so I can stand the ladder on the floor. I have chosen a hi tech chipboard flooring which is sealed on both sides and requires special glue to fix it.

 33161511558_4a9e55273c_z.jpg2019-02-09_01-40-05 by my0771, on Flickr

Recent high winds caused some issues with the weed barrier blowing it all over the garden so I had to spend time repositioning it the finished height is made up of black basalt stone so I put the stone around the back of the workshop and down the side which will be more difficult to get at later in the build.

I have also added the weed barrier under the floor which although it will be sealed I don't want to take any chances.

46327113344_bcb1423b2c_z.jpg2019-02-10_05-41-30 by my0771, on Flickr

 

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Here is the site tidied up a little with the stone down the side and around the back access will be limited in these areas once the boards start to go on.

32134089417_11df3a4eec_z.jpg2019-02-12_09-20-20 by my0771, on Flickr

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I laid some insulation in the space between the joists and fixed it in position with spray foam.

47040791102_a109474a7d_z.jpg2019-02-14_02-30-29 by my0771, on Flickr

As you can see by the broken piece it was not strong enough to hold the weight of our Springer Spaniels.

 47094710301_6c15584b0b_z.jpg2019-02-14_05-54-48 by my0771, on Flickr

It was time to repair the insulation and start to lay the floor.

47094710301_6c15584b0b_z.jpg2019-02-14_05-54-48 by my0771, on Flickr

This is special chipboard flooring coated on both sides with an anti slip finish, Held in place with special D4 glue which expands in use.

47094710301_6c15584b0b_z.jpg2019-02-14_05-54-48 by my0771, on Flickr

Here is the finished floor along with my first attempt at a roof.

47061843132_c392531746_z.jpg2019-02-16_04-55-24 by my0771, on Flickr

I lost a couple of days removing and replacing the roof frame the first one not only looked bad but would not have shed rain or snow very well. This is my second attempt.

46411489824_7d9c166b3c_z.jpg2019-02-18_02-22-44 by my0771, on Flickr

I am quite happy with this one. 

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Looks good :)

What are you going to put on the roof? It looks to be about a 2:12 or a 3:12 slope, you may have an issue with ice if you use a regular shingle. I work in a roofing supply store, in the sheet metal shop, we get a lot of people with ice damage on the sheds that have used a 3 tab shingle.

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@Buzzard2005 You are right  3:12 is the pitch the structure is going to be 18mm sheet material which will have an EDPM rubber membrane glued to it. It is very popular in the UK. There will also be 100mm of insulation between the rafters. 

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Here is this weeks progress report after the frame was finished this design calls for the internal sheeting to be fixed this also helps to square up the frame.

46254578625_ccf3c1f8ba_z.jpg2019-02-21_06-21-31 by my0771, on Flickr

I fitted the side walls first then the ceiling and finally the end walls. This picture shows the long ceiling panel with the temporary support bar which helped putting it in place.

47176032061_624f8a9531_z.jpg2019-02-22_01-27-43 by my0771, on Flickr

32234326517_d83a521c6b_z.jpg2019-02-22_01-31-21 by my0771, on Flickr

Today I have added the insulation on the outside of the ceiling and fixed it in place with expanding foam.

40223593823_9c7f471d87_z.jpg2019-02-23_06-21-39 by my0771, on Flickr

I may have been over enthusiastic with the foam gun :)

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I have made some progress since I last posted here it has been hard work there is a full write up on my blog but I will give some detail here.

46344367645_95bf8521c0_z.jpg2019-03-02_06-05-30 by my0771, on Flickr

After the insulation was in place I wrapped the whole building in a breathable membrane and started adding the battens.

I used mortice and tenon joints for the doors.

 47299383661_b6e8471672_z.jpg2019-03-06_02-14-12 by my0771, on Flickr

The original plan for the mortices did not work so I changed the design of the doors.

40352902443_c7e258dbf8_z.jpg2019-03-08_01-44-54 by my0771, on Flickr

I did get the doors right in the end.

46434847835_9edd833cc1_z.jpg2019-03-11_03-16-23 by my0771, on Flickr

Hinges caused me no end of issues I had three sets in the end before I got the ones that would do what I wanted. These are called parliament hinges very strong but also very expensive.

33474391048_809ccfda2f_z.jpg2019-03-11_04-14-12 by my0771, on Flickr

Doors hung.

32424405287_fcd5cb8cbe_z.jpg2019-03-13_07-05-02 by my0771, on Flickr

Water tight at last.

46453956375_2646d85539_z.jpg2019-03-13_02-39-37 by my0771, on Flickr

Outer cladding is next while I save for the outer roof cover.

 

 

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On 2/20/2019 at 1:05 AM, Buzzard2005 said:

What are you going to put on the roof? It looks to be about a 2:12 or a 3:12 slope, you may have an issue with ice if you use a regular shingle. I work in a roofing supply store, in the sheet metal shop, we get a lot of people with ice damage on the sheds that have used a 3 tab shingle.

Ice isn't a huge problem in England. Rain, damp and lack of tea are bigger problems. I expect that the OP wanted to gain maximum headroom while keeping the roof apex below the maximum height that doesn't require planning permission (building permit). Having said that I had an issue with melting snow being blown uphill on my shed roof this year. It found a gap and I only noticed when there was water dripping off the light fittings onto my bench.

@MY63 Your shed is coming along fine. Certainly looks better than what it replaced! Figured where you're putting the kettle and jaffa cakes yet?

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@MY63 I may just call you for a quote to build one in Norfolk. We have the knowledge and facilities to deal with Matt's 'lack of tea' apocalypse scenario.

It looks really good,

H

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I had to look up Jaffa Cakes. Looks yummy! I'd set aside some space if it was my shop!

Edited by alpha2

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41 minutes ago, alpha2 said:

I had to look up Jaffa Cakes

so you would have seen the whole 'is it a cake or is it a cookie debate', which went to court in the UK.

In the United Kingdom, value added tax is payable on chocolate-covered cookies, but not on chocolate-covered cakes. and Jafffa Cakes were deemed to be cakes not cookies, despite being cookie sized. Big win for the punter, as there is no 20% luxury tax to pay. I think they're the UKs biggest seller, or close to it.

In USA a similar product is  Lu Pims Orange European Biscuit Cookies

AND NO I AM NOT OBSESSED BY JAFFA CAKES!

:crazy:

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@Matt S We are quite a way off the Kettle and Jaffa cakes I am afraid. The outer cladding is here I had it custom cut by my local timber merchant it still needs to be stained but the weather is against us at the moment, We have sunshine and snow currently not intermittently but at the same time now it is just rain.

@hwinbermuda Thanks H there is no chance you could get me to build another it has been a fantastic experience and is the first large construction project I have ever done but I am knackered (totally worn out for those outside the UK )

The roof is going to be heavy duty strand board called OSB3 highly water resistant screwed to the battens and covered by a heavy duty rubber membrane especially designed for roofs. I made an error with the first insulation so there is now 150 mm of insulation covered by a breathable membrane then battened ready for the final cover.

 

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That is very nice..

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9 hours ago, MY63 said:

@Matt S We are quite a way off the Kettle and Jaffa cakes I am afraid. The outer cladding is here I had it custom cut by my local timber merchant it still needs to be stained but the weather is against us at the moment, We have sunshine and snow currently not intermittently but at the same time now it is just rain.

@hwinbermuda Thanks H there is no chance you could get me to build another it has been a fantastic experience and is the first large construction project I have ever done but I am knackered (totally worn out for those outside the UK )

The roof is going to be heavy duty strand board called OSB3 highly water resistant screwed to the battens and covered by a heavy duty rubber membrane especially designed for roofs. I made an error with the first insulation so there is now 150 mm of insulation covered by a breathable membrane then battened ready for the final cover.

 

I didn’t think OSB was very waterproof. If it’s the same as in the states basically sawdust and glue.

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1 hour ago, Mattsbagger said:

I didn’t think OSB was very waterproof. If it’s the same as in the states basically sawdust and glue.

There are newer products every day. OSB is chips and glue like he has on the interior and ceiling. It lasts for awhile in the weather. Used quite a bit in residential framing. Particule board is sawdust and glue, MDF is medium density fiberboard (paper and glue).

I wouldn't have anything out of MDF or particle board.

 

More about the newer products...

I did some sub floor replacement recently and it was spec'ed out with some OSB that is guaranteed for six months before needing to dry in the structure.

Meaning it can get weathered for six months before you close in your structure. Pretty impressive.

Edited by bikermutt07

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@Mattsbagger This is OSB 3 it is made with waterproof glue it has so much glue it actually is allowed to be used as the internal vapour barrier.

@bikermutt07 I am not sure if I mentioned it but my floor is made from Egger Protect chipboard it is sealed on both sides and was indeed open to the weather for a couple of weeks.

 46445165434_38d69ec171_z.jpg2019-02-21_06-20-40 by my0771, on Flickr

You must use the special glue that foams up through the joints and can be scraped off when you are ready. I read about it on a woodworking forum and my timber merchant ordered it in for me 22mm thick and really heavy. Price wise it was only a pound or two per sheet more than the standard sheets.

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