Yankee63

My chinese cobbler patcher arrived

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So, I bought a  HU-JI, looks like model 43-6.

My painted casting has no sharp edges, the machine was completely pre threaded so I could just tie off

new thread and pull it through. This patcher came with 12 spare bobbins, a new crank rod looking replacement part

and it came with a shiny new take up lever for the top front of the machine. It came with a spool of thread, a pack of needles and even a new bobbin carrier spare part.

Top that off it had 2 layers of leather sewn and needle holding it in place to show that the machine worked prior to shipping.

The stand for it is completely useless, but I attached it to a chunk of wood to hold it securely.

I will build a stand for it with a removable table to make flat surface around the needle area.

Here are my questions.

1) Can I run 207 thread with a 22 needle? or am I at max thread size with 138?

2) Are there alterations I can make to use larger thread?

Other than those questions I do have it up and running fairly smooth for breaking in a hand cranking machine that does go through 3 layers of tough horse hide.

I have a major helper as my wife used to work for Boy Scouts sewing and making patches. Her knowledge of sewing machines has really helped me.

So, if I can get some help on thread sizing by people who use these machines it would be greatly appreciated.

The more experienced people with these machine may know a way or trick to use nice thick thread for my holster sewing.

Thanks

Doug

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There are a couple of different sizes they make in these Chinese patchers; but the most commonly sold model appears to be the smaller one (mine is definitely the small one). I'm limited to #68 thread and it uses standard domestic needles. I believe some have used #138 but I reckon you'll be struggling to get any bigger thread through it.

As for holsters, just how big is this machine? There's no way mine could sew holsters.

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Its the regular size.

My wife used it to sew through 3 layers of dry horse hide.

Granted I need to work on my foot pressure and sharp points, but it is easily capable of 3 layers of 5-7oz.

Once I get a few minor bugs out of it, I do believe I can easily sew 2 layers for a holster.

It will also allow to spin the leather around and follow the original stitch holes to double up the thread.

Worked nice for a basic set up and run. I will snap a picture of it. Just the regular ol cobbler machine.

I think a table around the needle would suit it better to do more than just patches.

Proof is in the pudding. When I get it set up as I want it, I will show ya all the results.

Doug

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here's what I got

 

 

cobbler.jpg

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tag on cobbler.jpg

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I cannot show a picture with the size allocation to show the spare parts

Oh well.

Have fun all

Doug

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19 hours ago, Yankee63 said:

I think a table around the needle would suit it better to do more than just patches.

Proof is in the pudding. When I get it set up as I want it, I will show ya all the results

Looks like the standard model- mine had casting flash all over the parting line. Required a bit of grinder-love to make it not snag the thread and fingers... no bueno!

Plus mine was loaded with cosmoline- had to strip it, kerosene wipe down and re-assemble (with proper gear lube for rack and oil the arm and cam pivots) before I could use it.

You can make a table easily with a sink cutout from a Corian countertop (smooth and durable) or Melamine surfaced plywood easily. Why would you want these materials? Hey- glad you asked... they are smooth, easy to clean and provide the least amount of cleanup (Spray down- wipe up)... 

One thing you will need- the crank handle nut needs a washer or locking nut- otherwise its very frustrating to use it and have the crank fall off the shaft in your hand every so often (ask me how I know... :ranting2: )...

One more thing you may wish to consider also is adding a witness mark to the bobbin shuttle IN THE ARM- as it sits with the crank handle at TDC (top-dead-center). This will allow you to "find" the shuttle position if you have to reload mid stitch or have to remove it for jammed threads. 

Silver

Edit to add: Dont forget to file down the presser foot teeth!

Edited by SilverForgeStudio

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 Does not sound like the machine to own from what you just described ??? . I am sure it a fine tool and adequate machine for shoe cobbling on the streets of communist Vietnam or China . But not sure about Investing your time in the lowest common denominator . old saying of ..."putting lipstick on a pig ".
.

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Looks the same as mine. Like SilverForge I spent a lot of time grinding and cleaning parts but for what they are they're not bad little machines, pretty simple and somewhat bulletproof!

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5 minutes ago, nylonRigging said:

time in the lowest common denominator

True- but for those of us who are learning and would like the ability to speed up from hand stitching and get a feel for threads and such it is a good threshold machine (albeit hand powered). It is not a replacement for hand stitching for me- just a way to keep going after hands are sore or I have a time crunch and would like to finish a batch.

Being new and on a budget- it offers a bit of speed and familiarization- and a decent lower budget intro for the ability to sew thicker belts and sheaths (for me anyway)

Your mileage may vary- I am time rich and money poor for the hobbies department. An even trade- a bit of labor to get it functional, and now I know a few things about what I like (and dont like) about  this style of machine.

 

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28 minutes ago, SilverForgeStudio said:

True- but for those of us who are learning and would like the ability to speed up from hand stitching and get a feel for threads and such it is a good threshold machine (albeit hand powered). It is not a replacement for hand stitching for me- just a way to keep going after hands are sore or I have a time crunch and would like to finish a batch.

Being new and on a budget- it offers a bit of speed and familiarization- and a decent lower budget intro for the ability to sew thicker belts and sheaths (for me anyway)

Your mileage may vary- I am time rich and money poor for the hobbies department. An even trade- a bit of labor to get it functional, and now I know a few things about what I like (and dont like) about  this style of machine.

 

it is a rough machine . But I do see your points . there is something to be said for the truth of.. " less is More " . Less complicated purity .

.

Edited by nylonRigging

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I have spent enough time reading of how the "pig" can sew.

It may take a few adjustments, or improvements but I am handy so I will work through it.

Thanks for the pointers SilverForgeStudio.

Doug

Edited by Yankee63

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