Chakotay

3D printed floral tracing pattern

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Been thinking about it for a while for holsters I make on a regular basis, so I finally decided to give it a try. For those into 3d printing, you know it can be a process...

1. Traced my holster in Adobe Illustrator and designed my pattern. Once done, I exported the files as an .svg.  

2. I then imported the files into Tinkercad, extruded, and export as .stl

3. Import the .stl into my slicer (I used Slic3r Prusa edition).

4. Print the file! My printer is a Prusa Mk2.5S. The print is lightly wet-sanded to get the stamping surface flat.

 I discovered it was better to lightly hammer the pattern onto the leather rather than just trying to press the impression on.  

 

step1.png

Step2.png

Step3.png

Step4.jpg

Step5.jpg

Step6.jpg

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Cool!

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Nice work, what size is the line width and what filament did you use and height, it looks very sharp, If I was doing it so fine i think i would have used PET-g or something exotic, very impressed 

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Wow...it takes the idea of craft aids and tap-offs to a whole new level.
It does look like the lines are a bit thick... curious about how you feel about the result, and if you'd make any "adjustments" to subsequent patterns.
In any case, this is a real winner! Those tap-offs look like they'd last forever.

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Yes, the lines are thick, but the they're only 2 perimeters wide. I don't think a 1-perimeter wall would survive being hammered into leather.
For a quick, customized, repeatable guide, I think it works perfectly. Beats having to trace it out each time. I've already done the tooling (pict below . . . not the greatest work, but you get the point). 

Just regular PLA (cheap Inland brand from Micromart), 100% infill. I wasn't really paying attention to the extrusion height, but looking at the file it's 3.5 mm total height.  

 

Step8.jpg

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Gorgeous!
The results speak for themselves.

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Very nice "quick" "how to"..Thank-you for taking the time to photograph it and to post it.. :)

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I suppose you could glue it to a backing board for greater rigidity when tapping it?

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 Please can you tell me what is the actual mm width as 2 perimeters wide is not a term i am familiar with

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As an engineer by trade and a geek by inclination, I find this whole thing fascinating! And the end result is beautiful. Thanks for sharing!

Darren

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A perimeter is one wall of plastic filament the width of the printer's nozzle. Theoretically, it's the thinnest structure the printer can create. My printer has a  standard 0.4mm nozzle. So "2 perimeters" would be two walls of plastic (I'm guessing it'll be 0.4mm x 2 = 0.8mm. Though I've never really tested my printer for accuracy.)

I can measure it with a micrometer when I get home. But it's a bit of a moot point; while I was carving the lines didn't seem too big at all. They were about the same width as my swivel knife blade.

You can see the two walls in this slicer close-up:

 

Screen Shot 2019-03-22 at 8.42.22 AM.png

Edited by Chakotay
added pict

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Hello,

Very interesting. As I'm not in 3d printing  I wonder If a pattern like this is for sale?

Yours,

Bert

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2 hours ago, Chakotay said:

A perimeter is one wall of plastic filament the width of the printer's nozzle. Theoretically, it's the thinnest structure the printer can create. My printer has a  standard 0.4mm nozzle. So "2 perimeters" would be two walls of plastic (I'm guessing it'll be 0.4mm x 2 = 0.8mm. Though I've never really tested my printer for accuracy.)

I can measure it with a micrometer when I get home. But it's a bit of a moot point; while I was carving the lines didn't seem too big at all. They were about the same width as my swivel knife blade.

You can see the two walls in this slicer close-up:

 

Screen Shot 2019-03-22 at 8.42.22 AM.png

Thanks for that, but raises another question on how you get the two walls, as i have not come across this so far in 3d Printing

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