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Ill just get right to it. 

First.. if I am using an 8-9 Herman Oak veg tan leather, dyed with pro dye, do I need to also apply neetsfoot? 

Usually my process goes:

Dip Pro dye, neetsfoot, leather balm (with atom wax) and then beeswax

I have tried resolene, but didn’t research well and tried to apply straight out of the bottle. Knowing now, it needs to be diluted. 

 

On my wallets I used the same process, but with the leather balm, it actually pulled out an oily color after it dried. That is on 2-3 oz kipskin from Weaver. 

Second.. I have a real problem with dye rubbing off onto cash and cards with the wallets. Is it because it is kipskin? Tonight I tried applying leather sheen to the flesh side to prevent that from happening. Before that, I have tried rubbing until my arm is numb with little difference.

 

Also, on the holsters, would I use the same technique as on a wallets flesh side to prevent bleeding?

My main concern is the inconsistency. And then the amount of time I spend appying the leather balm, especially if it has no real benefit to these projects.  

Ideally, if I could get away using just the pro dye and beeswax, it would be great, but I’m not sure if that is okay?

Thank you in advance!

Frank

 

Edited by FrankWV

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2 hours ago, FrankWV said:

First.. if I am using an 8-9 Herman Oak veg tan leather, dyed with pro dye, do I need to also apply neetsfoot? 

No, you don't need to apply nfo, but it does help to restore oils lost during the dyeing. My end job is applying a beeswax/neatsfoot oil mix. The oil gets into the leather, the beeswax not only seals the leather but also burnishes/polishes up to nice satin-glossy finish

2 hours ago, FrankWV said:

Dip Pro dye, neetsfoot, leather balm (with atom wax) and then beeswax

I have tried resolene, but didn’t research well and tried to apply straight out of the bottle. Knowing now, it needs to be diluted. 

It is better to put on several coats of diluted/thinned resolene. It goes on more evenly, gets deeper into the leather and won't leave brush or sponge marks if applied that way

2 hours ago, FrankWV said:

On my wallets I used the same process, but with the leather balm, it actually pulled out an oily color after it dried. That is on 2-3 oz kipskin from Weaver. 

Second.. I have a real problem with dye rubbing off onto cash and cards with the wallets. Is it because it is kipskin? Tonight I tried applying leather sheen to the flesh side to prevent that from happening. Before that, I have tried rubbing until my arm is numb with little difference.

The dye has not been fully sealed into the leather. Several coats of thinned resolene or Super Sheene should seal it in, then apply and buff a beeswax mixture of your choice. Beeswax on its own might be alright but I add carnauba wax which not only adds hardness to the wax but raises the melting temperature a wee bit

2 hours ago, FrankWV said:

Also, on the holsters, would I use the same technique as on a wallets flesh side to prevent bleeding?

yes

2 hours ago, FrankWV said:

My main concern is the inconsistency. And then the amount of time I spend appying the leather balm, especially if it has no real benefit to these projects.  

Ideally, if I could get away using just the pro dye and beeswax, it would be great, but I’m not sure if that is okay?

There are no short cuts to getting a good finish. Its time consuming but that is the nature of it.

Obviously from your experience, as said above, dye followed by bees wax is not enough. Buff, buff, buff again, then buff again, two or three coats of diluted resolene or Super Sheene, then a coat or two of beeswax/carnauba wax/neatsfoot oil mix, buffed up is my finishing method.

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I really appreciate your reply. This is great info!

I have been doing leatherwork for about 18 months and I really enjoy the designing process along with the assembly. I just dont look forward to the leather finish.. I even enjoy rhw burnishing part... just not the top finish of the flat surfaces.

So, would it be wise to finish the pieces with the resolene solution before assembly, or would it be okay to do afterwards?

Maybe a resolene diluted dipping method?

Edited by FrankWV

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Too much oil or wax before applying acrylic or lacquer finishes from adhering, especially acrylic.  Apply the waxes after applying a finish.

Tom

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