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Kobe 1541S alternating lift height adjustment

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I have a new to me Kobe 1541S (made by same as JUKI contractor so clone or rebadge whatever...) and the pressure feet do not lift the same height when walking.

They do when lifted by knee or hand.

I can find no info on how to adjust the walking lift of just one of the feet.

The front or needle foot will only lift less than half the height of the rear foot when walking and this make it almost useless to me but I am sure can be changed somehow.

 

rear lift.JPG

front lift.JPG

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Great link to the manuals, I found these great. Thanks Dikmam

It’s sure helpful if one prints out the pages so to view one page and simultaneously is able to read the adjustment instruction on opposite page, as intended.  So to help this posted question pages 8-9 would be in a good view.  

Theres no doubt you should print the manual link, or save it then later try it. Its sometimes handy to check how its setup, so to print double side correctly for your layout viewing pages. 

Good day

Floyd

 

ps: i started using them stickies for holes on the page the 3 ring binder uses. 

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Dikman thanks and yes I have these (but excellent link thanks) and suspect that while there isn't a specific fix fro the problem I have I can apply the lift height fix to the alternating walking lift issue. I think since this doesn't have the adjustment knob I need to look at this area....  I suspect the screw in the slot on the right but haven't had time to patiently fiddle with it.

Stay tuned.

PHOTO_20190314_191215 (Small).jpg

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It maybe benefit to check pages 12 & 13 in that manual, carefully.

I found it a best practice to look over each step in the manual, particularly as they many times work upon the other, so following an order seems to be correct, 


  Good day

Floyd

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A bit different to my machines (I suspect those slotted pieces are just guides? A bit hard to see with all those fluffy bits in there). Best thing is to study the motion/movement of the feet and look at the various linkages and clamps. Try adjusting one at a time to see what effect it has, that way you should be able to set them back to how they were. These things aren't rocket science (just clever mechanical contraptions) so what can be undone can be put back together - eventually.

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12 hours ago, dikman said:

A bit different to my machines (I suspect those slotted pieces are just guides? A bit hard to see with all those fluffy bits in there). Best thing is to study the motion/movement of the feet and look at the various linkages and clamps. Try adjusting one at a time to see what effect it has, that way you should be able to set them back to how they were. These things aren't rocket science (just clever mechanical contraptions) so what can be undone can be put back together - eventually.

As I thought as well. I am not afraid of mechanical things since as you say they can be put back together (by someone at least!).

More will be revealed.....

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Heres a step from the link that can help. 

I think the picture is at top of page 12 in the manual linked, and corresponding to this copied text below. Pretty sure this works. It does and did on each of my 4 Jukis

Good luck on your mission  

 

(2) Alternate momentum


1. Set the stitch dial to “0”.
2. Turn the handwheel to make sure that the amount of alternate
vertical movement of walking foot 1 and presser foot 2 is
almost equal.
3. When the amount is not equal, loosen setscrew 3 in the top
feed rear arm and adjust so that the amount should be equal. Adjust the amount almost to A = B.
TM When the amount of alternate vertical movement of the walking foot is larger than that of the presser foot :
1) Loosen setscrew 3 in the top feed rear arm in the state that walking foot 1 is raised a little, press walking foot 1 to the feed dog.
2) Re-tighten the setscrew and turn the handwheel to make sure of the amount of the amount of alternate vertical movement of the walking foot and the presser foot.
Adjust the vertical stroke of the walking foot so that it is larger than that of the presser foot in accordance with the sewing products.
TM Sewing sponge material or the like
TM Sewing material with overlapped sections
When the alternative vertical strokes of the walking foot and presser foot are considerably different
TM The stitch pitch is different from the value set by the dial.
TM Decrease the number of revolution of the motor a little since the feed efficiency is decreased.

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Thanks brmax.... I will apply what I can but this model doesn't have a dial on the top....

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I understand, mine don't either. I sure wished, but in any case that specific adjustment for us both on standard styles will be pictured on top of page 10 and its written adj. procedure adjacent page. 

The adjustments now for the walk and presser foot ( equal ) are listed as mentioned pictured on page 12 of the Juki manual and written on the adjacent page.  

It does as you can notice have a separate designation photo for machines with automatic thread trimmer. Mine doesn't so the photo left is relevant to me. 

Many times reminding ourselves the stitch knob positioned correctly for these adjustments is critical. They many times require different settings for different steps in these adjustments. 

 

Have a good day

Floyd

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Thanks I look forward to following your guidance here.

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This is not in the engineers book nor the owners manual.  I'll try not to go off on a tangent here.  There seems to be some confusion about presser feet climb and lift of the alternating presser feet.  Juki climb device, or DL device, is for the LIFT of the presser feet.  Such as  the difference between two pitter pattering feet on the low end, or two feet taking big tall steps over an obstacle, if you will.  This does not adjust the difference in feet lift. For example, if the inside foot is lifting 2mm and the outside foot is lifting 6mm as you cycle the machine.

If the feet are lifting to to different heights, try this.  See attached image.  Remove the back cover and rubber dust cover and you can access this clamp held in place with metric hex cap screw.  Lift the higher foot the difference of the two, loosen the screw, the presser spring should then drop both feet to the plate.  Tighten the screw.  Usually, this takes a few attempts to get this just right. Check with a flat head screw driver or something to see that both feet are raising to equal levels.

So, for example; if the inside foot is lifting 2mm, and the outside is lifting 4mm, raise the outside foot 2mm, loosen the screw, foot will drop to the plate, and then tighten and check.

This is the same adjustment for many other model machines, not just this one.  Hope this makes sense.

DNU-1541Rear.jpg

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Thanks Gregg for the photo! 

I found another manual this procedure is in, though its been hidden as I stuffed it in a sleeve folder in the binder. 

Its called; Juki instruction manual #no.05

and with a series number 29349503.

this has all the languages and its clearly a great manual in actual operator sense, better than a lot. In that aspect I totaly recommend it. 

In any case I hadn't looked at it well enough but this adjustment, its in there! On page 28. Instruction no. 19. This description is much much more normal, I believe or it is for me anyway. ( i dont need as big of a sign )

But this manual here its not the quality of that engineers manual that is linked with a big thanks to dikman.

I have that one printed and in binders for each of the 41, seems handy and I write down what and any dimension i used in each step in adj. specs. 

Maybe a slight issue in ocd ness, yet its a record.

 

Have a good day everyone

Floyd

ps:

 

6C5465CF-368A-4CDD-BF2E-A79F49292A57.jpeg

Edited by brmax

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14 hours ago, brmax said:

Thanks Gregg for the photo! 

I found another manual this procedure is in, though its been hidden as I stuffed it in a sleeve folder in the binder. 

Its called; Juki instruction manual #no.05

and with a series number 29349503.

this has all the languages and its clearly a great manual in actual operator sense, better than a lot. In that aspect I totaly recommend it. 

In any case I hadn't looked at it well enough but this adjustment, its in there! On page 28. Instruction no. 19. This description is much much more normal, I believe or it is for me anyway. ( i dont need as big of a sign )

But this manual here its not the quality of that engineers manual that is linked with a big thanks to dikman.

I have that one printed and in binders for each of the 41, seems handy and I write down what and any dimension i used in each step in adj. specs. 

Maybe a slight issue in ocd ness, yet its a record.

 

Have a good day everyone

Floyd

ps:

 

6C5465CF-368A-4CDD-BF2E-A79F49292A57.jpeg

This is for the "pitter patter" or "high climb" of presser feet, same as what the DL or dial on top of the machine does.  This is just not as fast or easy to adjust, but it is the same adjustment.  This adjustment has nothing to do with the variance in presser feet lifting.

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Thanks gents!!! Between those 2 simple adjustments i now have a very usable machine  stepping high with an even gate! And no mechanic fees and dragging to 400kms to get it done.

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