kevinkay

I want to restore a Singer 111W153

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I got this machine for free, it came without a history and some parts disassembled.  It has no motor, no table.

What I really want to do is to completely disassemble the machine, clean it all shinny, repaint the body then get it back together.  Reading about these machines maybe there is  too much "adjustments" to try and do that.   My next path was to get what i need to make it sew and see how functional "as is".   I have some motors and belt I could "jimmy-rig" without a clutch or speed control or I have several small home machine motors/foot control.    I ordered the front tension assembly, the tension release slide (which I think the former owner was trying to make), a bobbin winder and some walking feet.    At further inspection I will also need the spring for the tension slide, a thread guide where the needle attaches and maybe even the piece that holds the needle?   I think also there should be a spring on the needle bar??  At this point I reassembled the knee presser foot lift without tightening or adjusting.  Not sure I have that big spring in back correct - seems a little too "unrefined" how its loose on the back of the screw post and the top of spring doesn't go into a hole??.  I don't understand the stitch length adjustment - It's on the hand wheel,  I could not get it to move until i pulled it out (and I was able to pull it completely out).  I have that little button on the bed but I can see nothing looking through the hole (no dial in there).  I believe I don't have a safety clutch underneath nor the second little button on the bed.

Sorry for rattling on......So my next plan is to remove the oil wicks and degrease and wash down the whole machine.  Can I separate the 2 main pieces without loosing adjustment?  (I understand the timing belt adjustment and its lined up and the belt is OK).   I hate that someone painted everything - the thread guides and all the moving parts on back are painted.

The tension slide on the singer parts list  was 240141, i was told 240500 is the same or will work?

I am handy and pretty good on "figuring it out" but only dabbled and adjusted domestic sewing machines.  I am a -  "jackass of all  and master of none".

Where do I start?

THANKS!

Kevin

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Are you sure this isn't a 111W103? It has the older stitch adjustment knob on the handwheel and no buttons protruding through the bed like the 111W15(x) series machines have.

 

-DC

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I am not sure of anything...but it does have the brass pinned in model #, the Singer emblem is missing.

it does have one little button on the bed

I am going to research the 103, thanks!

 

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disassemble everything? that's A LOT of work for a machine that isn't very valuable.

i'd just sand the paint as best i could, soak it in solvent (replacing all non-metal parts), tape it off, spray primer, spray paint

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not disagreeing with your logic, but I think playing golf is a waste of time .  I am the guy cutting his own grass - pulling weeds without poison, rotating tires every 5000 miles,  draining the hot water tank once a year,  sealing the driveway every 3 years, and my 16yo Weber grill still looks like it was bought yesterday.

I want my machine to look like this and hope the "oil" decals are original to my machine   :) 

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Go for it.  Just be careful not to disassemble it to much.  If it is a 111W153, there should be three shafts counting the needle bar.  I only see one.  There is a army manual out there on this machine you should get a copy of before you disassemble the head.  Much more info than any  Singer manual. Written for the military during WWII.

glenn

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If I am understanding you - Yes, 3 rods. 

i have a copy of that  WWII Parachute repair manual 

THANKS!

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54 minutes ago, kevinkay said:

not disagreeing with your logic, but I think playing golf is a waste of time .  I am the guy cutting his own grass - pulling weeds without poison, rotating tires every 5000 miles,  draining the hot water tank once a year,  sealing the driveway every 3 years, and my 16yo Weber grill still looks like it was bought yesterday.

I want my machine to look like this and hope the "oil" decals are original to my machine   :) 

s-l1600-2.jpg

-

NICE .. Man that 111 is Really SWeeeeet looking and clean .

.

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2 hours ago, kevinkay said:

I am going to research the 103, thanks!

The tag does say 153....but I have no explanation for it. The machine certainly LOOKS like a model previous to the 111W15(X) models. The common wisdom says they changed the stitch length adjustment from the dial on the handwheel to the stop button on the bed and a stitch length scale you viewed through a hole in the column after the 111W152 model (I have a W152 and it is fitted out as described), and also added a safety clutch to protect the hook, also with its own button in line with the stitch adjustment stop button. You can see the pretty prominent pair of buttons on the bed in the picture posted. The single button you refer to may be an oiler ball zerk, in the depressed area behind the bobbin cover plate. It really only matters if you are trying to find some of the parts for the earlier type machine in a W153 manual. I know several here own examples of the earlier 111W machines and can perhaps explain when the W153 runs actually began.

-DC

Edited by SARK9

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There must be a reason it looks like it was used for spare parts, maybe it was knackered in a factory and not worth repairing

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The machine (pictures in 1st post) has no safety clutch (no plunger in flat bed) and does not need a plunger for stitch length adjusting as it is a very early version of the 111 with a knob for stitch length adjustment. I would guess its from the 1930´s - 1940´s era.

Well depends on the point of view  - if it was a plain drop feed straight stitcher I would not touch it but a triple feed / walking foot machine that cost me nothing - why not? You cannot earn money with a restoration & selling it but for the fun and then owning a functional walking foot sewing machine for what ever (future) purpose... why not  :-) Seems most parts are present. I would first buy the missing parts (not many I guess) and then reassemble it and when it sews I would start the restoration. I would also not strip it completely. Maybe dry ice blasting is a fast way for cleaning and removing old paint.

 

Edited by Constabulary

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Duh........The "pretty" machine photo that I posted shows "oil" at the same "button" I thought was used for stitch length AND I even commented on the "oil" decals - I missed that one!!

How should that stitch length dial work, should it pull out completely?   AND weird that I have that sight hole but no dial down there - whats the purpose of the hole if Singer hasn't  yet developed the "newer" stop button and dial??

Can a walking foot machine be tested, actual stitches without a motor and just turning the wheel??

I can't find a Singer industrial serial number date chart, # is W616927

I have to degrease this machine, my hands are filthy every time I touch it.  I know of these 3 oil wick's ( the third photo-puff of felt under the fork).  Am I missing any others?

 

THANKS for all input!

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you have no sight hole - you have an oil hole - the sight hole is above the bulge (see picture of my 111G156)

You can pull out the stitch length knob (and rod) and nothing goes out of alignment.

There is a short end with very coarse threading at the end of the hand wheel that's the "guide" for the pin inside the stitch length knob. You screw it in by turning it toward you with a bit of pressure to the knob (jiggle it a bit back and forth for finding the right point...)

EDIT:

the last 3 pics are from my 108w20 which has the same stitch length adjuster as your early 111. And the Singer 153 also has this type of stitch length adjuster.

 

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Edited by Constabulary

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Some extracts form my 108w20 manual - hope this helps

 

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Yes,someone must of changed the brass plate over the years,sometimes if you take it off & look at the other side you'll find the correct model#.It is something like a 111w101,103.

 

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Found a 103 on Ebay - sure does look like mine.

Hum....and My Singer Medallion is missing, and they don't look like they fall off with out intentionally removing them.   AND this Ebay one also has the Medallion missing.......

So now one more piece to hunt for - the correct model plate, :)

THANKS for the dial diagram, now I understand it.

(Photos of 103 on Ebay)

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Edited by kevinkay

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How do I know if i have a "vibrating presser bar" the change between W100, W101 and W104

As 111W101 but with vibrating presser bar and pressure spring for high speed. For materials with no bulky seams to cross.

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all triple feed / walking foot machines have a vibrating presser bar - this just means the outer presser foot bar (when you look form the left side it is the bar on the left) is holding the material down until the needle penetrates the material and moves up when the needle bar and inner foot + feed dog are feeding the material. Moving up and down means vibrating in Singer-English.

BTW - not sure if I posted this brochure already. It´s a 1950s sales brochure for the 111 type machines

Singer 111w Class Machine Brochure.PDF

Edited by Constabulary

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FANTASTIC! thanks for sharing the brochure!

 

Hay- 111w153 is missing from the brochure, :( 

Edited by kevinkay

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I think the brochure is newer than your machines and I´m sure it does not cover all subclasses. Singer probably dropped some subclasses and some new subclasses where added... I don´t know...

Edited by Constabulary

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I guess I was thinking like most products when a new model comes out they stop making/selling the old.....

it shows 150, 151, 152, 154, 155 on the chart - just struck me that 153 was skipped. 

Are the "oil" decals available? - I LOVE seeing them on the machines in the brochure.

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you can get decals from Keeler Sales. https://singerdecals.bss.design/

They sometimes have single pieces from reject decal sets. Just browse their website and send them an email with what you could use. I´m sure they can help you.

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From everything I am reading and looking at  - it sure does seem like my machine has the wrong plate, why do you think someone would do that??    Cowboybob suggested  the backs having the true model number - I can't imagine someone would go through the trouble of re-engraving a tag but maybe sticking a newer model tag that they had laying around (or should it be lying )!  How would you suggest I pull off that plate, grind down the top rivets or just pull it out?

Are there any destinations or clue to make it a 101vs 103? 

 

THANKS!

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I got Bamboozled..........!

(I got it free so no harm)

there was no bent pin behind the tag/inside the machine.   A utility knife eased it out  - pins came straight out.  Behind does not look like factory paint, and no engraving on the back of the tag

Last coat of paint was gloss black, at least 2 other coats of flat back below.IMG_5553.jpg.633c0f70eae44afd3841b613d4c9a7f5.jpgIMG_5552.jpg.8b3f27d49c5576382db3ffff67a1f08d.jpgIMG_5552.jpg.8b3f27d49c5576382db3ffff67a1f08d.jpgIMG_5555.jpg.9a2dff17fad544ceeee0e30f66a34b27.jpgIMG_5556.jpg.0f816c124faf2ccb6675d677ea6604d9.jpg

 

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Took the dissemble route.

Like everyone has said the US Military instructions are the best.   Now that I have the 2 parts separated I am going to sandblast and paint.    The inner parts (needle bar area) that have probably have never been re-painted are gloss black so thats what I will restore toIMG_5601.thumb.jpg.4bfac32a14ec4b25e545e891558db9e6.jpg.  

I could use some help on where oil wicks need to be replaced - hard to tell whats an oil wick or a bunch of dust/fuzz built up.    It does not look painted on the bed where the 2 parts meet so i am assuming it was painted together at the factory??

THANKS!

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