Sterlclan1

Dye before burnishing?

Recommended Posts

I’m looking to dye some leather for my holster would I dye the edges before burnishing? I’ve been practicing edges ant they look pretty good.  Now to the dye process.  I have made a few holsters as practice with some uphoyleather glued together to get the thickness right. Now for the “real “ one. Thanks Jeff. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dye edges before burnishing.  My reason is that I feel the dye soaks into the edges better when they are not slick and the fibers matted down.  Also, depending upon how you burnish, anything you put on the edge is absorbed into the leather and to me that prevents the dye from fully penetrating.  For holsters I would dye the edge, burnish and finish off with a beeswax or beeswax blend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Round edge then dye before burnishing for best results. I might dye after burnishing w water if edge is ragged.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks I’ll try some before committing to the actual holster. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to one of the best, you should burnish before dying the edges

 

The link to his actual PDF doesn't seem to be working anymore but you can read the info and comments. Personally, I dye then burnish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/3/2019 at 7:14 PM, Tugadude said:

I dye edges before burnishing.  My reason is that I feel the dye soaks into the edges better when they are not slick and the fibers matted down.  Also, depending upon how you burnish, anything you put on the edge is absorbed into the leather and to me that prevents the dye from fully penetrating.  For holsters I would dye the edge, burnish and finish off with a beeswax or beeswax blend.

This is the same method I use.  Always seems like good results.  I like the final with beeswax, it softens and blends the color of the edges in my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Halitech said:

According to one of the best, you should burnish before dying the edges

 

The link to his actual PDF doesn't seem to be working anymore but you can read the info and comments. Personally, I dye then burnish.

In the end, use whatever method works for you.  I've seen hidepounder's work and mine couldn't compare in the least.  Folks should try both ways and decide for themselves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Tugadude said:

In the end, use whatever method works for you.  I've seen hidepounder's work and mine couldn't compare in the least.  Folks should try both ways and decide for themselves.

I agree. I've watched so many of the "Gods" on youtube and tried to make sense of why they were doing things in the order they do and decided that once I've figured things out for myself, that's the way I'm doing things. Just because it's been done a certain way for 200 years, doesn't mean a newer and better way can't come along.

These people that think only the old ways are right are the ones that if they had their way, we'd still be riding around on horse and buggy, whale oil would be lighting our homes and kids would still be using slate boards to write their homework on

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have experimented a bit, and found that sometimes if you dye edges with no burnish the dye can easily saturate and bleed to the front/back.  It just absorbs too much too quickly and leaves a stain along the edge.  A quick burnish with just a little water and maybe a little saddle soap can help that over-saturation problem.  Once the dye has dried, then do a full on burnish with whatever burnishing compounds you like.  I like tokonol, or beeswax myself, but you wouldn't want to use either before dying since that may not allow the dye to penetrate at all.   To make things more interesting, different leathers absorb dyes differently, so about the only thing you can do to be sure you'll get the result you want it to try it on some scrap.

- Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, billybopp said:

I have experimented a bit, and found that sometimes if you dye edges with no burnish the dye can easily saturate and bleed to the front/back.  It just absorbs too much too quickly and leaves a stain along the edge.  A quick burnish with just a little water and maybe a little saddle soap can help that over-saturation problem.  Once the dye has dried, then do a full on burnish with whatever burnishing compounds you like.  I like tokonol, or beeswax myself, but you wouldn't want to use either before dying since that may not allow the dye to penetrate at all.   To make things more interesting, different leathers absorb dyes differently, so about the only thing you can do to be sure you'll get the result you want it to try it on some scrap.

- Bill

Makes perfect sense to me.  Dye can spread too far if you aren't careful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if it can help someone,

my procedure is,i dye the edges,and if it's a vegetable natural tan leather,after dyeing i put gum adragant and i burnish and i finish with a personal preparation of bees-wax mixed with carnuba wax and i polish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have tried a few different ways. Still practicing but learning. Thanks guys. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now