tstan47

Marks on leather

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Hey guys, 

i am having a problem with marks on leather projects when they are either being worked on or when finished. Other than the obvious ‘try to be more careful” is there something I can do to get rid of the marks ? 

Here is a holster I am working on that show what I am talking about.

 

 

EC257C36-453F-44E8-8620-0CA757FDD898.jpeg

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They can be finger nail scratches, I have heard of some folk using fine cotton gloves to stop it happening

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I concur, probably finger nail scratches. Ways to remove? burnish with a flat piece of glass which has a rounded edge. These are sold as burnishers;  example - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Leathercraft-Glass-Slicker-Burnishing-Leather/dp/B004JAOB2K  You can get these cheaper than this or you can make your own.  For small nicks and marks you can generally reduce them with a spoon end modelling tool or even a teaspoon, but for large areas like this you need the glass plate

Ways for it not to happen? cut finger nails close, be careful or give up leather work.

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What is the best way to remove the marks, wet leather first then use spoon or the glass burnisher?

 

And for the record, I am still learning, this is the second holster I have ever made. 

Edited by tstan47

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Nice stamping and stitching on the holster.I make sure I trim my finger nails when stamping else I get little indents on the wet leather. May use a glove or change the way I hold my stamp.

Thanks Fredk hadn't thought about using a slicker or modelling spoon on those pesky little scratches

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That leather looks awful dry.  Have you put any neatsfoot oil on it?  Dubbin?  anything?  sometimes I find that can help prevent scratches too, seems more fragile when it's dry.  Buffing lightly with a soft cloth after oiling can lay some of the scratches down.  Bending it when dry can cause stress cracks too.  After casing, plating with the glass evens things out before stamping.   Well placed stamps, look forward to seeing the final version!

YinTx

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Can someone explain what is “Dubbin” how is it used etc and neatsfoot oil would that interfere with dying the leather?

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28 minutes ago, tstan47 said:

 

Can someone explain what is “Dubbin” how is it used etc and neatsfoot oil would that interfere with dying the leather?

Dubbin is a mixture of waxes and oils used to nourish the leather.  Many make it themselves, or you can buy it like Aussie or Sedgwick's leather care, many many other brands.  Just apply and rub in, sometimes use a little heat like from a hair dryer on low setting to help it along.   Usually used after dye, etc.  It tends to make the colors more vibrant, and the leather have more lustre.

Neatsfoot oil can be applied before or after dye.  It will not stop the dye from penetrating the leather, but can give a slightly different effect depending on when applied.  Usually necessary  after dye to prevent cracked leather - dye can make leather stiff, and it needs oils to improve it's serviceable life.  Also usually applied before antique.  Let it rest for several hours after applying to allow it to migrate throughout the leather. Hope this helps,

YinTx

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Go to your local quilting supply shop and get a pair of cotton quilters gloves. The ones I have came with non-slip finger tips and are perfect for holding tools and stitching.

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On 6/14/2019 at 7:03 AM, Carnivore said:

Go to your local quilting supply shop and get a pair of cotton quilters gloves. The ones I have came with non-slip finger tips and are perfect for holding tools and stitching.

.......or you could just trim your nails  :dunno:

@tstan47 I always use  neatsfoot oil on my belts  and some other products before I dye them, but with brown or lighter coloured  belt & products , I use a thin oil similar to ' Armorall' for car upholstery,  as it dries  mostly clear and doesn't darken the leather like neatsfoot does.  

HS 

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