LydiaGP

Thread Size for Shoe Soles?

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Hello,

I have an Adler 267 GK 373. I saw a thread on this forum indicating the absolute largest thread size that could be used would be 207. I regularly use #92, but don't have any idea what the other sizes are like. Someone has asked me whether I could sew dog toys they've designed (the thickness of the material they're using isn't a problem - I think I could fit it under the presser foot fine). They're using someone now who uses the same thread that is used on shoe soles. My assumption is I wouldn't be able to get anywhere near the thickness of shoe sole thread on my Adler 267, but not knowing the thread sizes I don't really know what 207 is like. I'd hate to buy a spool of 207 just to find out it's nowhere near the thickness I'd need.

I realize this is kind of an odd question, but can anyone clarify, is 207 anywhere near the thickness of shoe sole thread?

Thanks!

Here's the thread I was reading that mentioned 207:

 

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207 is kind of the middle of the spectrum. It's fine for things like belts but too small for gun holsters (mostly due to safety). 

I believe cobblers use 416 to sew soles to shoes.

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Is the heavy thread for design purpose or does it need the strength, thats a question you could ask the person who wants them

This thread guide may be of use

https://www.tolindsewmach.com/thread-chart.html 

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Most shoe soles are indeed stitched with a very heavy thread, far heavier than you could use in your 267.

What's the material being sewn, and the thickness? It may be that the current manufacturer is using a very heavy duty machine like a sole stitcher or harness stitcher because the material requires a very heavy "punch" to penetrate, and/or a thick, strong needle to avoid deflection.

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Thanks for the help, all. This is just the information I needed. Good point on  the "punch" strength, too. It's a very heavy-duty material, and the toys are designed for full-size dogs to gnaw on. It doesn't sound like my machine is right for the job.

Thanks again!

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What type of toy? Some chew toys that I have done and seen are sewn inside out first to hide and protect the thread. This way a smaller thread can be used. A small hole is then left somewhere to pull the interior out which will be then be the exterior. The edge is then sewn just to help flatten the folded edge out and close the pullout hole.

kgg

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It's a toy he designed, and the threads are exposed. That's an interesting idea (didn't think about how turning it inside out would protect the thread - was just thinking of it as a way to look nicer but good point). Unfortunately the type of material is too stiff to be turned inside out. He has a cobbler sewing them for him now. I do vinyl upholstery work for him so he asked if I was able to sew them on my Adler. I think he's planning to just buy his own machine though. Which is OK - was going to do it if I could but he has a backup plan.

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Ah maybe in the future the pillowcase method may come in handy. For me doing the pillowcase method on some things I was able to stop having to redo stuff as my guys were destroying the V138 seam thread, teeth like razor blades, and drop down to V69. They still destroy the exterior edge thread which is mainly for looks but it doesn't fall apart. 

kgg

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