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Swell Cover without a welt

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I have seen a few saddles with swell forks that were sewn without welts.   There is a seam and these are not fitted covers without welts. These seem to hold well.  Does anyone have experience with this method, and if so, would you explain the technique.

Also any comments why this method would not be satisfactory.

 

Thanks

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You want to sew a swell cover but not put a welt in it and it is not a fitted cover?  Not sure I know what you are describing.  I have seen no welt covers with no welts, braided covers and covers with welts but they were all fitted.  Do you have pictures of what you are describing?  

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I can see each stitch and it looks quite thin. I think over time with weather and use it would become unsightly and start coming off.  Are you looking to build a saddle using this technique?  

Here is an old post on covering swells.  It contains some good information.  There are some other posts on this forum that might be helpful.   

 

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The technique you are describing is called a blind stitch.  It is very common with cutters and show saddles.  It can be done very well and holds up well.  The swell cover is fitted on the tree and cut so the edges butt together.  Then the cover is removed and stitched together from the back side with the threads going thru the leather diagonally and not breaking the surface.  Things to be aware of when covering a swell this way.... 1) do not fit the swell cover too tight to the tree.  The leather will shrink when it dries and if too tight it will pull a gap in the seam and the stitches will show.  2) Keep stitches close together.  No more than 1/4 inch between stitch holes.  3) use thick swell cover so there is enough thickness for stitches.  You don't want the stitches to be closer to the surface than the epidermis layer of the hide.  I have made a lot of saddles with blind stitched swells.  Good Luck.  Keith

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Thank you both for your reply to my question, this helps me a lot.

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On 12/23/2021 at 12:49 PM, kseidel said:

The technique you are describing is called a blind stitch.  It is very common with cutters and show saddles.  It can be done very well and holds up well.  The swell cover is fitted on the tree and cut so the edges butt together.  Then the cover is removed and stitched together from the back side with the threads going thru the leather diagonally and not breaking the surface.  Things to be aware of when covering a swell this way.... 1) do not fit the swell cover too tight to the tree.  The leather will shrink when it dries and if too tight it will pull a gap in the seam and the stitches will show.  2) Keep stitches close together.  No more than 1/4 inch between stitch holes.  3) use thick swell cover so there is enough thickness for stitches.  You don't want the stitches to be closer to the surface than the epidermis layer of the hide.  I have made a lot of saddles with blind stitched swells.  Good Luck.  Keith

Keith, I thank you as well for that advice.  I have never used a blind stitch on a swell cover, because I could never get it to look like I thought it should.  I kept thinking I was doing something wrong.  Even the cutters I've built I have used a welt in the swell cover. My question to you is, exactly what type of stitch is used and how is the leather positioned when stitching?  My failure to perfect this type of stitch has irked me for years.

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