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suzelle

Big Barb - The Consew! (255 RB2 - I think!)

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I called Seller Monday Morn., she said she would be home all day Friday, or I can come look any evening. So Friday it would be.

Before buying, I called the Consew Company to ask questions about 206 vs. 255 machines, new and used. I was advised that the machine (If it was a Consew 255 RB2) would have a "U" sized bobbin in it. The guy tells me that if it's a running Consew 255 RB and a good price, he said I should run and get it. He said Auto Upholsterers love these machines. So... after speaking to Mr. Consew, I called the Seller back and told her that I thought it was the machine for me, and picked it up that night, Monday Eve. Okay, I bet you want to know the price, she listed it at $400, I gave her no less. Decided it was worth every penny, no dickering.

The Seller was not sure about the bobbin size, and I thought it may be a bit bigger than my Pfaff 545 bobbin, but wasn't sure since I didn't have one with me for comparison. I decided it didn't matter about the bobbin size, it was at least as big as my Pfaff and knew I wanted at least an "M" size, no smaller.

When I began to shop, I was looking for either a New Consew 206RB or New Juki DNU1541S, or anything used that comes close to the specs on these two machines. Luckily, I found one! Huge savinigs over a brand new machine and I really have not had to do much to it, other than oil, grease, adjust. I love to fix and fuss with stuff, so that machine was for me!!

With no name badge on the machine, I really don't know if it is officially a 255-RB2, so I'm including the serial number on the machine. Its seems kind of hit and miss about what information can be gathered on serial numbers that correspond to the year of manufacturing on these machines, maybe there is somebody on the forum here who can take the mystery out of it and tell me what year the machine might be.

Thankfully, Wiz (thank you Wiz) was able to share some of his wisdom about the machine and it's bobbin size. I'm not sure if the "U" bobbin was added to the machine later or if it came like that from the factory. Doesn't matter, it's no smaller than "M" size, and now that I've gotten it home to compare, I know it's a "U" bobbin.

Missing from the Lower (bobbin) area is the oil check thing, I think it is probably like a dip stick in a car. It gives you the reading of the oil level. If anybody has one they can show me photos of in their machine, I'd appreciate it. I'll find the parts manual and post a pic of that area as well.

Thanks for reading and for any potential info. you may have about my Mystery Girl, Big Barb! I named her after the previous owner who passed away. Her daughter sold me the machine. She said her Mom was a Big Lady, so that was quite alright that I wanted to name the machine Big Barb. She got a chuckle out of that. Told her I'd love the machine like her Mom did.

Consew U bobbin.jpg

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IMG_6370.JPG

IMG_6381.JPG

Edited by suzelle
add photos

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Here's some information (from Double needle 339 RBL) that has same parts in the right side (saddle and hook) as my machine. I'm hoping to see a real photo of the dip stick/oil check thing. Does anybody still have that part in their machine? I am wondering if it would look something like an ice pick or a screwdriver? Are there several parts that are all connected to make it? Asking because there are quite a few parts in the parts list. I have just a hole in my bobbin area where it used to be.  :( I'm thinking it's not a part that I have to have, but would be nice if I could find one. Machine runs without it and I can oil without it, right? Any advice is much appreciated.

IMG_6386.JPG

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Part Numbers below. Let me know if there is a better diagram somewhere.

Oh, and regarding the motor, I am going to put the smallest pulley I can find on it. The machine really races. I'm accustomed to a clutch motor, so that is not the issue. It's just that this machine runs so smooth that it flies! My shaft is 3/4 inch, and the outer diameter of the pulley is about 2.25" approximately. I found a new pulley on Ebay that was 3/4" shaft, with a 2" pulley. Not sure if it's going to make much of a difference, but it is the smallest pulley I could find.

I do need to get better educated on clutch motors. I have included the specs on the Camsew motor. It says 3450 RPM, is that a faster motor than the other clutch motors available? What about the 3.4 AMPS? I may have a slower or less powerful motor I can pull off a machine I'm not currently using. If you can shed some light on that stuff, please do. LOL. I am not an electician.

I'm thinking I can adjust the belt a bit to accomodate the new pulley when it gets here. If that does not make it slow enough, and/or I don't have a less powerful motor around here somewhere, I'll just get a servo motor. If anybody knows of a smaller pulley that will take a v-belt or if another pulley and belt combo is better, please share. Much appreciated!

339 RBL.jpg

Right Saddle-Hook.jpg

Missing Dip Stick.jpg

Edited by suzelle
Photos and pulley info added.

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4 hours ago, suzelle said:

outer diameter of the pulley is about 2.25" approximately. I found a new pulley on Ebay that was 3/4" shaft, with a 2" pulley. Not sure if it's going to make much of a difference, but it is the smallest pulley I could find.

New speed will be 89% of the original speed.  I doubt you will really notice much difference.

 

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its a super fast clutch motor - you will not have fun with it - get rid of it - buy a servo

Singer 211G and 211U had similar dipsticks - maybe worth checking parts lists. I think Singer called them oil gauge.

Edited by Constabulary

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Nice find, it looks almost new!:specool:  In general clutch motors run at 3600 rpm or 1700 rpm (round figures), based on my experience I wouldn't mess around, replace the clutch with a servo, you won't regret it.

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18 hours ago, Northmount said:

New speed will be 89% of the original speed.  I doubt you will really notice much difference.

 

Northmount, Thanks for doing the math for me. Makes me feel a bit better, you came up with same approximate difference in speed reduction that I was figuring. I agree, probably I won't notice much difference.

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23 hours ago, suzelle said:

My shaft is 3/4 inch, and the outer diameter of the pulley is about 2.25" approximately. I found a new pulley on Ebay that was 3/4" shaft, with a 2" pulley. Not sure if it's going to make much of a difference, but it is the smallest pulley I could find.

For all those who want to try and use a pulley to reduce speed on their machine here is a easy online calculator for both single and multiple pulley configurations:

https://www.blocklayer.com/pulley-belt.aspx

kgg

Edited by kgg
wrong link

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19 hours ago, Constabulary said:

its a super fast clutch motor - you will not have fun with it - get rid of it - buy a servo

Singer 211G and 211U had similar dipsticks - maybe worth checking parts lists. I think Singer called them oil gauge.

Constabulary,

Okay, I'm not crazy! It's the motor, it is crazy fast! The guys in the shop I'm working at are both on Juki machines, they tried my machine out and didn't like how fast it was. LOL. They like fast cars but the sewing machines, not so much! LOL. Yes, gonna have to get a Servo. Think I'm headed in that direction. Thank you! Oh, and also thanks for mentioning the Singer 211G and 211U. I will put those machines on my list too, for parts. :)

Edited by suzelle

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15 hours ago, dikman said:

Nice find, it looks almost new!:specool:  In general clutch motors run at 3600 rpm or 1700 rpm (round figures), based on my experience I wouldn't mess around, replace the clutch with a servo, you won't regret it.

Dikman,

Thanks for the "Nice Find"... I think you bought an old Singer a while back that I was drooling over. Flad you like Big Barb! Okay on Servo!!!! I think you are right, I won't regret getting one. The clutch motor on this machine is rediculously fast!

1 hour ago, kgg said:

For all those who want to try and use a pulley to reduce speed on their machine here is a easy online calculator for both single and multiple pulley configurations:

https://www.blocklayer.com/pulley-belt.aspx

kgg

kgg, thanks for that link on pulley and speed reduction!!! Good stuff there!

Yesterday, I bent the bobbin tension spring a bit to go back into a curve shape. It had flattened out so much I could not tighten the tension screw any further. That provided a temporary fix, but I expect it won't hold long as metal was compromised when it went flat. So better get that part now! I dropped one of the three gib hook screws first time taking apart the bobbin case to fully clean and oil. Man was that crusty! Gib screws ordered! She's functioning on just 2 screws at the moment. Got to remember, magnetic screwdriver for those screws!!!! Didn't have one with me that day.

I've been ordering small parts and replacement parts to keep the Consew 255 running happily. She hasn't been run for a long time, so I am discovering what she needs and what is worn out or needing replacement as I go. So far, I have some stripped screws, probably a beehive tension spring, perhaps the whole top tension spring assembly (?), also  bobbin tension spring and screws, some hook gib screws. Gotta get her a dip stick/oil gauge too! 

Edited by suzelle
adding

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Yesterday I took the advice of Dikman and Constabulary and changed my motor out. However, I did not replace it with a Servo, I'm really fine with clutch motor that runs at a reasonable speed. It's what I have on hand and I need to get this machine running quickly so I can work and make some money now with it.

I removed the Consew machine's 3450 RPM motor by removing the sewing machine head and tilting the table with motor back so the motor was laying against the floor. Using a couple of pieces of wood, I was able to prop the motor and the side of the table up as needed to remove (3) support bolts and the control switch from the table. Then I did the same with the 1700 RPM motor on my Pfaff 545 machine. I then installed the 1700 motor and adjusted all the bolts and screws, belt, and foot pedal to fit. The Consew is now set to sew at a speed I'm used to. This motor is a little louder than the other one, but I can easily tell when I need to switch it off. I should probably do some maintenance on the motor and it will run a little quieter. There is a good youtube video on how to do that - Alexander Dier I think.

The 3450 is getting a proper sendoff - to the dump! I tried to give it away but nobody wanted it.

Today, Big Barb is headed off to visit my Old Sewing Machine Repair Man. He's going to give her a good checkup. I figure why not spend a little and have a Pro look her over and make the right adjustments. Then I'll just maintain the machine. He will do the usual tune up stuff and I asked him if he could replace all the tension springs and check springs too, along with any stripped or missing screws. Well worth it to have him look things over!

Oh, forgot to mention... I am going to order a Servo, but it's going on the Pfaff 545 that I have at my home shop. The Consew is getting set up at my friend's shop and I will use it there.

 

Edited by suzelle

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https://www.thethreadexchange.com/miva/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=sewing-machine-bobbin-style-info

I hope it is okay to post the link above. Let me know if it's not. I order thread from this place and have always found their list of bobbin sizes that correpond to each machine model very helpful. I get my cones of thread here usually, they've had most of the stuff I have used so far. I haven't oredered the pre-wound bobbins from them, but refer to this chart when I am looking for machines. I went back to it today just to verify if my "Big Barb" is a 255RB machine, since she's missing her original badge. If the machine's bobbin case didn't get altered and I can verfiy what model a machine is, that can make it much easier to find other parts too, which I'm doing now. Hope it helps somebody else.

Consew 254 thru 266 Bobbin Sizes.jpg

Edited by suzelle
add machine models with bobbin sizes

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1 hour ago, suzelle said:

I haven't oredered the pre-wound bobbins from them, but refer to this chart when I am looking for machines.

Sometimes prewound bobbins are wider than metal bobbins, especially in larger sizes, like U. You might have to waste a few yards of thread to get them to drop in if that's the case. I haven't had that problem yet with the G size prewounds I buy from them and other places. But, somebody who uses them did and told be to be aware.

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10 hours ago, Wizcrafts said:

Sometimes prewound bobbins are wider than metal bobbins, especially in larger sizes, like U. You might have to waste a few yards of thread to get them to drop in if that's the case. I haven't had that problem yet with the G size prewounds I buy from them and other places. But, somebody who uses them did and told be to be aware.

Okay Wiz, thank you so much! Will stick with the G refillables if I order again then. Much appreciated!

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58 minutes ago, suzelle said:

Okay Wiz, thank you so much! Will stick with the G refillables if I order again then. Much appreciated!

G style bobbins are too small for Big Barb! Don't even think about it! They are like half the size. Just load your own U bobbins with the bobbin winder.

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Thanks again Wiz! Okay, I'll find out just what I can do with her when Monday rolls around. I did sew with the machine last week and made a couple bench seat covers. The bobbin area got jammed up and I had to totally disasemble and put back together. I lost a gib screw, ordered a few extras and magnetic screwdriver after that. I didn't get it put back together exactly right, but close. I think the timing was thrown off just enough that I decided she was going to get a full tune up by a Pro. Not me! I spent my day yesterday (it was a fun day) taking a Ferry to the Sewing Machine Repair Man. I left machine with him a few hours and he had it all tuned up, good as new. Looking forward to really putting Big Barb to use next week. Crossing my fingers she will run flawlessly and earn some money! I just know the fast motor wasn't helping either, glad there is a slower motor on the machine now!! :)

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Suz, may I call you Suz? There is a trick to avoiding jamming your machine with top thread wrapping around the shuttle. Hold back the starting threads for a few stitches. If the bobbin thread is inaccessible, hold back the top thread. You will probably have to pull up or down to hide the first knot or two later on. Failure to do this usually results in the machine coming to a halt and you having to cut the thread under the material to remove it, then open the shuttle cover (and maybe the throat plate too) and as you found, the gib holding the bobbin case, then pull out all the double or triple wrapped thread. You may have to retime the hook if the machine lacks a safety clutch that disengages the hook when there's a thread jam.

It is an unfortunate fact that a large number of perfectly good industrial sewing machines suffer from firsttitchitis; the grabbing of the top thread and double-wrapping it around the shuttle and bobbin case. Sometimes you may get lucky and be able to start sewing without jamming the hook, but only if the take-up lever is already on the downstroke and the top thread is firmly captured under the presser foot, and the foot has enough pressure to not let the thread slip out. Too many ifs in play.

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7 hours ago, Wizcrafts said:

Suz, may I call you Suz? There is a trick to avoiding jamming your machine with top thread wrapping around the shuttle. Hold back the starting threads for a few stitches. If the bobbin thread is inaccessible, hold back the top thread. You will probably have to pull up or down to hide the first knot or two later on. Failure to do this usually results in the machine coming to a halt and you having to cut the thread under the material to remove it, then open the shuttle cover (and maybe the throat plate too) and as you found, the gib holding the bobbin case, then pull out all the double or triple wrapped thread. You may have to retime the hook if the machine lacks a safety clutch that disengages the hook when there's a thread jam.

It is an unfortunate fact that a large number of perfectly good industrial sewing machines suffer from firsttitchitis; the grabbing of the top thread and double-wrapping it around the shuttle and bobbin case. Sometimes you may get lucky and be able to start sewing without jamming the hook, but only if the take-up lever is already on the downstroke and the top thread is firmly captured under the presser foot, and the foot has enough pressure to not let the thread slip out. Too many ifs in play.

Yes Wiz, you may call me Suz! My Sis does. :) Notice I shortened your name up as well.

Thank you for sharing your trick, I have to say it makes me feel better as I have found myself doing exactly as you suggested. I noticed that my luck is a bit better when I hand walk (or try to sew slowly which wasn't possible with the 3450 motor) the first couple stitches, carefully holding the tail, and did notice the difference of the top thread tugging different than the bottom thread. I think with my Pfaff machine, I hold both threads pretty evenly and as long as I am holding them, not too many issues. I appreciate knowing it's a common thing with these machines. So thank you! Great tip.

FYI - Yes my machine does have  a safety clutch and I learned how to use it. It's like my Pfaff 545 when you get a jam, but different method of resetting. The problem I caused, I believe, is that I had loosened the screw to the presser bar lifter. I think that should probably have been left alone. That may be what the timing issue is. I reset it best I could. The Sewing Machine Repairman told me it was not very much out of time, but he adjusted it all anyhow. It was stitching pretty good when I brought it to him, but occasional looping, not looping with every stitch. But I can't have any loops, especially when I am top stitching every inch (24 rows) down each seat panel. Bench seat has a total of 48 rows on bottom cushion and 48 rows on the back cushion. Yikes! With all that said, I only had to remake one panel.

Yes, you are right, that is exactly how the thread got so jammed up and the timing went wacko. I had to pull out stuck thread and had to take out the gib and the whole bobbin case. I really should have left the But I also assumed it could have been the bobbin spinning in the bobbin case with herky jerky movement of the crazy 3450 RPM motor. This machine also hadn't been run since at least 2017, so she needed lots of love and oil. I think timing was probably good til I got ahold of it. LOL. I'm learning how to operate this one and it has been very humbling. I whipped through a couple of projects on the machines at the shop and on my Pfaff, but Pfaff did need to see the Sewing Machine Man too, I knew it was just a matter of time. I was doing so well getting things done, then had some major down time with both machines needing adjustment.

Wiz, do you think it would be smart to have a bobbin tension spring ready just incase I need it? I found one that looks pretty good, it's a star shape that sits at bottom of bobbin case I believe. I think I like the design of it better than the standard ones I have seen. I generally don't like them, but it may be wise to pay attention to that too? Let me know your thoughts.

Also, do you have an oil check gauge in your Singer 211G156? I see it listed on your '"Current Crop of Machines" list. I looked up your machine and it does look very much like mine. These are nice machines with a beautiful stitch. I'm not sorry at all I bought Big Barb. We're just going to have to get better acquainted.

Edited by suzelle

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6 hours ago, suzelle said:

But I also assumed it could have been the bobbin spinning in the bobbin case with herky jerky movement of the crazy 3450 RPM motor.

Either use an anti-backlash spring under the bobbin, or insert the bobbin against the direction of rotation of the shuttle. This means the bobbin thread will make a sharp turn off the bobbin to the slot and stay under the spring better. It does add a tish more bobbin tension which may need to be counteracted by backing off 1/2 turn on the bobbin tension screw.

6 hours ago, suzelle said:

Also, do you have an oil check gauge in your Singer 211G156?

Negatory. Mine is manually oiled.

 

6 hours ago, suzelle said:

Notice I shortened your name up as well.

Everybody calls me Wiz. That's who and what I am!

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6 hours ago, Wizcrafts said:

Either use an anti-backlash spring under the bobbin, or insert the bobbin against the direction of rotation of the shuttle. This means the bobbin thread will make a sharp turn off the bobbin to the slot and stay under the spring better. It does add a tish more bobbin tension which may need to be counteracted by backing off 1/2 turn on the bobbin tension screw.

Negatory. Mine is manually oiled.

 

Everybody calls me Wiz. That's who and what I am!

Okay Wiz, THANKs again!!!

I will go and find one of those anti-backlash springs I put away! LOL. I'm already threading the bobbin case the way you suggested, so hopefully backlash spring will help.

Yeah, I figured yours probably didn't have the self-oiling. It's not that hard to oil them. My industrial embroidery machines have oil reservoirs too, but I still have to regularly oil many points on the machines, and grease a few gears once in a while. Just part of regular maintenance.

My Sewing Machine Man told me to just use a nail or something in as an oil gauge, works the same. No biggie.

Have a great rest of the weekend Wiz!

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Many would suggest that obsolete "clutch motor" is not worth the bother or the time needed for the necessary learning curve....  unless you plan on working in a garment factory doing a quota of by-the-piece work with no say over the equipment provided, or just wish to collect another skillset with ever diminishing real-world value.

I recently did a shop clean-out and had a full pallet of clutch motor "take-offs" I had shoved out of the way....all were originally installed on the various used industrial machines I had purchased over the years. I listed them on the usual sales sites like FB MKT and Craigs list, priced at $15 each or a cheaper price for all. Several looked like new.  I had ZERO takers for a couple of months time, and finally gave the whole batch to a neighbor's grandson to tinker with for his non-sewing projects. They really seem to have zero market value these da ys.

 These old industrial motors originally became commonplace with "individuals" as the typical installed component available on the surplus second hand sewing machines sold off and replaced by factories, and in past times there was little else available as a power source for these bargain priced cast-offs. There are now several styles of "servo motors" available which are much more pleasant to use either in a high-production factory OR a small shop/home shop, and their popularity is a result of many factors. Mine are capable of 3500/4000 RPM and will definitely rock if you need to rock, but are much less temperamental and predictable for very slow detailed work. Most all of them DO require the RPM to get up into the "power band" for sewing hard to penetrate or sticky materials, and adding a speed reducer (torque multiplier) is a quick fix that is pretty palatable for most. 

The anti-backlash "feature" was provided to counteract the rotating inertia of a bobbin spinning nearly as fast as the machine could drive it on repeat patterned parts (as in the above ACTUAL industrial factory or shop), then coming to frequent abrupt stops.... it would unwind a couple of revs and produce a good birdnest frequently. If your style of sewing is often required to do long runs as fast as possible as some upholstery shops encounter, then including the backlash washer will benefit you and its not really going to bother anything. The actual problem is most likely that clutch motor's awful behaviors.  

The machines with a "vertical axis" bobbin (like the Juki LU563, Singer 111W and similar)  tend to be completely intolerant of just starting out stitching without hanging on the the needle thread for a couple of stitches. If you have a top-loading bobbin, figure on hanging on to the thread tails. As others here have mentioned recently, I also use a strong magnet to anchor that thread when I have to have both hands on the work. I think the issue is a design that allows the first stitch to "prefer" pulling the loose thread tail rather than pull the needle thread through the whole tension assembly when it begins. That safety clutch is there for a reason!

My Consew 206RB5 (horizontal axis bobbin) actually makes a marketing feature out of its ability to simply change bobbins and start sewing without so much as pulling the bobbin thread up through the feed dog first as was always the usual practice, but I do tend to hold back the needle thread out of habit anyway.....

 

-DC

Edited by SARK9

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1 hour ago, SARK9 said:

The anti-backlash "feature" was provided to counteract the rotating inertia of a bobbin spinning nearly as fast as the machine could drive it on repeat patterned parts (as in the above ACTUAL industrial factory or shop), then coming to frequent abrupt stops.... it would unwind a couple of revs and produce a good birdnest frequently. If your style of sewing is often required to do long runs as fast as possible as some upholstery shops encounter, then including the backlash washer will benefit you and its not really going to bother anything. The actual problem is most likely that clutch motor's awful behaviors.  

-DC

Hi Sark,

Thanks so much for your thoughts! I no longer care too much for clutch motors, although my Pfaff ran just fine on the one that came with the machine. I had sewn on a lot of clutch motor machines when I used to make aircraft covers. We did sew long stretches of fabric, wing covers, engine covers, entire canopy covers, and smaller parts too like intake and outake plugs. Not just one cover at a time, but many of the same pattern. Those machines were a pain in the butt though, when we did the smaller pieces. I used to wish I had a servo on my own machines at home and got one. It was one of the earlier models and I don't think I got even a year out of it. So I stayed away from them for a while. I hear they are much improved over the earlier models and certainly plan to use them again. For now though, using what I have to make some $, then will invest in the clutch motor. That 3450 RPM motor that came with my $400 Consew 255 - it went straight to the dumpster. Not trying to sell, I couldn't even give the thing away! LOL. A controllable clutch motor I feel is a useful thing, if I can put it on a machine and sew with no issues, and I didn't have to pay extra to get it. But if I have to buy new motors, they will be the new Servo motors and I'll be buying one in a few weeks or months for sure. I have dumped a few bucks into parts (screws, feet, other little things that add up) for both my Pfaff and the new to me Consew.

I do have a question about parts... I have bought parts from Ebay and have also gotten them from Certified Dealers of the machine brands I have. I am wondering if I should focus on parts being sold by certain manufacturers that may be of higher quality than others? Some say OEM, some say they are aftermarket. Some don't say what they are. Do you or anyone reading this see a difference in quality? Just curious. I have in the past bought an after market Hook (entire assembly) for an old Singer 31-15 that had parts that flat out would not fit. I ended up being able to use some of the parts from that assembly but had to keep some of the parts with it that were OEM and on the machine already. It worked out, but I was disapointed that all the parts of the assembly didn't fit. Couldn't return it as a whole because I'd used some of the parts. Even still, I got the job done and got the machine running very well. It was kiind of an easy machine to fix, not complicated.

As I am buying parts for my old Consew, I'm just wanting to get the highest quality I can find. Thankfully, Consew is still making this machine. So I am hopeful I can find most of the parts from them. Pfaff machine, can't find every part, but so far I've been lucky to get what I really needed and have taken some parts off another machine or two.

Although I've done very little Auto Upholstery work and some Aircraft interior work (like Auto Upholstery but FAA approved materials), I have much more to learn. Always learning and I'd consider myself really more of a beginner in this field. I have a lot more experience with furniture upholstery which can be done with a domestic machine or semi-industrial machine.

I appreciate all your comments (advice) and will go back and read again when I'm changing out the small parts and the motors on these machines. Thank you Thank you!

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Weird but this Works!

After having lots of problems with loops and thread jams, I had determined that the bobbins I got with my machine were too small. So I ordered some new ones on Ebay only to find they are the same exact bobbins that came with the machine! They are U/Large but they don't fit! They are larger than an M, but slightly too small for a Consew 255/ U. Ordering bobbins again, this time from a Company called Diamond Needle Corp. They look different than the others, hope they work! I ordered a bunch of parts for my Consew and a few parts for my Pfaff. Close to $130 I think is what I spent. This Company had decent prices and good Customer Service. Very friendly on the phone, but you have to order on-line.

While I wait, I was really tempted to try and make Big Barb sew without loops and jams before my next order of new bobbins got here! Geesh.

So, I read about all the tips and tricks I can find and come across one where somebody suggested cutting a disc the size of my bobbin out of sandpaper, also cut a hole in the center so I can drop it into the base of the bobbin case. I try that and whallah! She is now sewing, almost perfect! I decide that there is still quite a bit of space between the wall top of the bobbin and the slide plate and make one more sandpaper disc and drop it in. Then I sew again. Now I have a perfect forward stitch!!!! Even going over lumps and bumps, several layers of vinyl and foam, and seems too!

I actually got some sewing done on a real upholstery job yesterday. The only problem is, when back-tacking, I'm getting a little tangle in bottom thread, but not big enough to be a jamming problem. If I hand-wheel it when back-tacking, that's a little better and can start and finish a line of sewing. Gotta figure out what's going on with the back tacking, but I'm going to get the right size bobbins in the machine first before I figure out that issue. I also have some new backlash springs coming (star shaped) and quite a few other parts like screws and other springs I plan to install.

I'm hoping I have a good hook. I called a Consew Dealer this morning to get ready what that may cost.

So this is just an update. I'll probably add some photos of how the stitch looks when I am at the machine again. So stay tuned. :)

Thanks everyone for reading and also for your help/commeents and suggestions. So helpful!

Edited by suzelle

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