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Applying metal spots with spot setter tool?


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#1 RunningRoan

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 01:03 AM

I am a leatherwork newbie and I'm still doing VERY simple projects :) and having a great time! But I have run across a few questions...

Right now, I'm working on making a noseband for a halter with hair on cowhide overlaid on the top and embellished with round metal spots and some conchos. Uhh...did I mention that I'm still only able to tackle VERY simple projects? :rolleyes:

Here comes the question: For whatever reason, I decided to apply the round metal spots to the cowhide only, then glue the cowhide to the latigo leather I'm using for the noseband. The prongs on the spots were not long enough to go through both the hair on cowhide AND the latigo. I was using the Craftool round spot setter tool and was able to punch the prongs of the spots through the cowhide without using a chisel. But I had a real problem with the hair on cowhide "warping" a bit from the metal spots. Hmmm...I went ahead and finished decorating with the spots, glued it to the latigo and placed some weight on top, hoping it'll flatten out as it dries overnight. We shall see...

I'm not 100% sure that I'm using the spot setter tool correctly. I was laying the hair on cowhide over one of the holes in that piece of metal the kit comes with (technical jargon), centering the spot setting tool (loaded with a spot) over the hole and tapping the prongs of the spot through the cowhide and the prongs would pop through the cowhide un-bent. That part worked pretty good. Then to bend the prongs, I'd flip the piece of metal over to the side with the shallow round divets, put the prongs into the divet that corresponded with the size of the spot, centered the spot setting tool back over the spot, and gently tapped with the mallet until the prongs were bent. I was not getting real consistent results doing it this way. Am I using this tool correctly?

I have seen pictures of people using what LOOKS like this Craftool spot setter tool WITHOUT the metal block thingy. And they were hammering the spots through a finished piece of work (i.e. multiple layers of leather) on a marble slab. I did not see a chisel anywhere near them, so I assumed they were not using one. How are they able to do this?

I would really like to add spots to the finished piece and have the prongs go all the way through and crimp back nicely. Is a machine my only hope?

#2 Hennessy

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 12:39 PM

I am a leatherwork newbie and I'm still doing VERY simple projects :) and having a great time! But I have run across a few questions...

Right now, I'm working on making a noseband for a halter with hair on cowhide overlaid on the top and embellished with round metal spots and some conchos. Uhh...did I mention that I'm still only able to tackle VERY simple projects? :rolleyes:

Here comes the question: For whatever reason, I decided to apply the round metal spots to the cowhide only, then glue the cowhide to the latigo leather I'm using for the noseband. The prongs on the spots were not long enough to go through both the hair on cowhide AND the latigo. I was using the Craftool round spot setter tool and was able to punch the prongs of the spots through the cowhide without using a chisel. But I had a real problem with the hair on cowhide "warping" a bit from the metal spots. Hmmm...I went ahead and finished decorating with the spots, glued it to the latigo and placed some weight on top, hoping it'll flatten out as it dries overnight. We shall see...

I'm not 100% sure that I'm using the spot setter tool correctly. I was laying the hair on cowhide over one of the holes in that piece of metal the kit comes with (technical jargon), centering the spot setting tool (loaded with a spot) over the hole and tapping the prongs of the spot through the cowhide and the prongs would pop through the cowhide un-bent. That part worked pretty good. Then to bend the prongs, I'd flip the piece of metal over to the side with the shallow round divets, put the prongs into the divet that corresponded with the size of the spot, centered the spot setting tool back over the spot, and gently tapped with the mallet until the prongs were bent. I was not getting real consistent results doing it this way. Am I using this tool correctly?

I have seen pictures of people using what LOOKS like this Craftool spot setter tool WITHOUT the metal block thingy. And they were hammering the spots through a finished piece of work (i.e. multiple layers of leather) on a marble slab. I did not see a chisel anywhere near them, so I assumed they were not using one. How are they able to do this?

I would really like to add spots to the finished piece and have the prongs go all the way through and crimp back nicely. Is a machine my only hope?

what i've ended up doing is tap spots into a piece of skirting belly thru your work,first, do several peel work out of lea,flip it over studs down on skirt'n' bend prongs into each other one prong allway down,then other, then one last tap with hammer not too hard or you might collapse stud it gets easy after awhile.adios peter john

#3 Kowboyboots

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 04:39 PM

Heck don't be embarrassed, we all run into silly things we can't figure out. I two have always had this problem an as you know I am not new to it. I have never liked the setters an can't remember the last time I used one.
I first always iron my hair on flat, I use a t-shirt press but if you don't have one a hot iron will work. It won't hurt the hair or the hide side, I don't use steam cause I am trying to make it stiff not soft.
Then I push the prongs through an bend them over individually. It is faster for me to do it this way then to decide if I am using one of those setters right, LOl. I bend the pron right on the area it attaches to the spot an lay it flat, not bent in. I use the metal end of my exacto knife.
Does any of that make sense, I know what I am trying to say but not sure that's what is coming out, LOL?
If you are going all the way through maybe slit or drill a tiny hole through the latigo where the prongs go through.
one of my handiest tools I have recently got was the Dremel cordless drill & screw driver set. I pre drill just about everything with a tiny bit.
Good luck,
Kathy

#4 ryano

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 12:41 AM

Hello!
I use to spot by hand, but do not anymore. I ran across 2 standard rivet company no. 2 machines and 2 Smith machine spot setters. All are foot operated. Piece of cke now. I use to be a tool and die maker so I turned (machined) my owm drivers and anvils. If you can find any of these, they are sure worth getting.

#5 Bree

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 02:12 PM

Hello!
I use to spot by hand, but do not anymore. I ran across 2 standard rivet company no. 2 machines and 2 Smith machine spot setters. All are foot operated. Piece of cke now. I use to be a tool and die maker so I turned (machined) my owm drivers and anvils. If you can find any of these, they are sure worth getting.

Ryano... Can you machine a driver/anvil for pyramid spots??? Those are kind of hard to find.
:huh: :huh: :huh:
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#6 ryano

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 09:48 AM

What do you need the driver and anvil to fit? We can go from here.

#7 Bree

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 10:24 AM

What do you need the driver and anvil to fit? We can go from here.

I have drivers and anvils for round spots in 1/4", 3/16" and 1/2". I suspect that the anvils would work for similar setters designed for pyramids just the driver and housing would have to change. I have a Heritage foot pedal setter I got from Weaver Leather. I think it is similar to your model.

I am not an expert in this machinery so I am just not really sure.
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#8 ryano

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 03:04 AM

Actually our presses are quite different. I cannot make the diamond spot holder because I do not have access to an EDM machine anymore. This Amish fellow might be able to help you out though. Write him a letter explaining what you need. Good luck!

Bylers Custom Leather Machinery
11558 North East Rd.
Conewango, NY 14726





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