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kskinner

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About kskinner

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Profile Information

  • Location
    Originally Ireland, now Canada

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Small goods, gloves, bags, shoes
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  1. Thanks for the advice. I think getting it fabricated is my best option. Not a metal worker so I take your word for it! Here's a video of it in use. Enjoy. https://youtu.be/0xvJbI9qJJI?t=244
  2. Exactly. The components would be held in place using the jaws, and you would weave the needle in and out of the fingers. The thread would slide up over the fingers and would make a nice, tight even running stitch. To help position the piece, would would start by threading the needle through the components at a given point. Then you would slide the pieces in between the jaws until the needle (which is resting half way through the pieces of the leather so there is half of the needle poking out either side) rests in a slot between two fingers. Then the glover would position the seam nice and flat and parallel along the jaw. Hard to explain. Best to watch this video until you get to the part where the clamps are in use... https://youtu.be/0xvJbI9qJJI?t=244
  3. Hi all, Leatherworker recently moved to Canada here. Make a range of things including hand stitched gloves. I'm trying to hunt down a particular tool that would make my life easier, otherwise I'll have to DIY it. This is called a glover's donkey, some of you know the stitching pony or horse. It's a bit like it. The difference is the foot operated metal jaws, and small teeth for stitch placement. It is a uniquely glover's tool, as for most leathers the teeth would leave a dent or mark. They show up every now and then on antique websites, I would love to know if any of you (or your grandmothers) have one in your attic. Would be willing to pay for it and delivery to Canada. Otherwise, if any of your have had something fabricated at a metal workshop, would you be able to point me in the direction of something who could make such a thing... even the top half. I'm woodworking-savvy but my metal-working skills don't extend past bending bulldog clips. Thanks
  4. Yes, the idea is that the jaws hold the two components together and you zig zag the needle in and out of the holes (hand-stitched gloves are done with a running stitch), so they dictate the stitch lengths and actually help with the speed of the stitching. Quite ingenious.
  5. Hi all, Leatherworker recently moved to Canada here. Make a range of things including hand stitched gloves. I'm trying to hunt down a particular tool that would make my life easier, otherwise I'll have to DIY it. This is called a glover's donkey, some of you know the stitching pony or horse. It's a bit like it. The difference is the foot operated metal jaws, and small teeth for stitch placement. It is a uniquely glover's tool, as for most leathers the teeth would leave a dent or mark. They show up every now and then on antique websites, I would love to know if any of you (or your grandmothers) have one in your attic. Would be willing to pay for it and delivery to Canada. Otherwise, if any of your have had something fabricated at a metal workshop, would you be able to point me in the direction of something who could make such a thing... even the top half. I'm woodworking-savvy but my metal-working skills don't extend past bending bulldog clips. Thanks
  6. Oh Janey Mac, getting political! let's leave it there and thank you to both for your replies on what is already a several-day-old topic. Techsew Ron I will seriously consider dropping you a line when I arrive, and kgg and Twotrees and I have taken all of your advice to heart and thank you both for taking the time to reply. Will be in touch when I'm set up! Any other glovers on this forum? Among my other work (bags, small goods and shoes) I do also hand stitch gloves and was wondering if there is anyone else here who does that?
  7. Twotrees! Simard was a great suggestion, holy they look like exactly what I need! They have nice clickers too.... that may have to wait until later on in the year. Nice one, thanks for mentioning them! I want to stay as far away from any Tandy store as possible hahaha. Have been selling their tools in the shop I work in for the last two years and am sick of that company. But thanks all the same. The tackshops are another great mention... loads of great contacts. This is brilliant - in Ireland, it's so easy to network because everyone knows everyone. You spend one week visiting people and you've pretty much met everyone worth visiting! It was so daunting thinking about networking in Canada, it's such a huge country. Thanks for making it easier. Will DEFINITELY be checking out the other shops too, need good suppliers for thread, glue, zips and other sundries
  8. Yes have come across them on my google searches. Definitely somewhere to check out. Thanks for that!
  9. Great to hear, thanks for that. Should be able to find something that'll work for me. Appreciate the welcome! That sounds like a brilliant lead, I should definitely get in touch with them. They are amazing people - one summer when I visited Canada, they very kindly showed me around one of their sawmills - all of these amazing home made machines processing lumber. Just the nicest most welcoming guys. All of them puffing away on pipes! Great people
  10. Will be most likely settling in Kitchener/Waterloo area of Ontario, not far from Toronto. Subject to change but definitely Ontario!
  11. Agreed. But I have never desired to buy one of the those Chinese patchers, those things are hideous and I wouldn't trust them as a doorstop. I was of the belief that the modern remakes were vastly improved, but it's eye opening to hear that they based the modern versions off of the Chinese 29k patcher. I will stay away from the Techsew patcher then.
  12. This is brilliant advice guys, thanks everyone very much indeed. Leading theory seems to be to ditch the treadle base and pack along my long arm with me. Sounds like a plan. I'll get my hands on a motor when I get there and from there will be unstoppable. Any thoughts on what I should get as a workhorse machine? Do people use Adlers in North America? Can I get my hands on a Adler 69 or is that fantasy? Any other machines I should keep my eyes open for, for light to medium weight work on a cylinder bed? Thanks again folks
  13. Hey Constabulary, thanks for the reply. Have thought about selling treadle base for the bigger machine, yeah. It's a 29K72, all of the bits and bobs with it. Very lucky to own it, I know, but the trade off with buying new would be availability to replacement parts. Not to mention that my machine is old; the SPI has suffered and I like the idea of starting fresh with a new patcher. But thanks for the advice. I can get good money for the 29K72, and it would cost a few hundred to ship. Have you come across the Techsew patchers and are they worth the price? Nope, analog. Treadle base on both.
  14. Hi all, first post. Thanks in advance and please let me know if this is the wrong section to post this. Will be moving from Ireland to Canada in March. Need advice on my options RE machines. The details are as follows: Currently own two Singer 29Ks, one long arm and one short arm, as well as other smaller machines which are coming with me (overlocker, outseam stitcher, etc, not relevent). The short arm was given to me for free, I cleaned it up and will be selling it. No problems there. The long arm is my pride and joy and is a machine I use all the time. By way of explanation, the type of work I do and the designs I make require a patcher. I am unsure as to whether I keep this one, sell it, bring it to Canada, or what. The third machine that is essential to me, but I do not own, is an Adler 69, which belongs to my current place of work and will be staying there. My questions: I require two machines in my future workshop once I move. The patcher and the workhorse, which is currently the Adler. My options are to sell all my current machinery, save on the money which I would be spending on shipping them over, and buy modern machines once I touchdown in Canada. Currently I am looking at the Techsew Patcher and maybe their 2600 cylinder machine in lieu of the Adler. Or I just try find someone selling an Adler 69. My requirement is just something that can handle light to medium weight with a foot very close to the edge of the cylinder bed. I mean, as an added bonus, ideally the machine would have the compound feed of the Adler. Their feed is just... lovely. Finally, to cut to the chase, I just need people's second opinions: Am i being silly selling my Singers or should I ship them over with me? Is it worth the cost? Does anyone know if the Techsew patchers/2600 are any good? Are there other alternatives? Thank you all very much in advance. Sorry for the long wall of text.
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