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Pressor Feet And Plate Confusion... And A Pfaff 335 Question?

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I have a SewPro Mini 441 machine that I'm still trying to get up to speed on.

I do a variety of work - passport covers, wallets, belts and straps, journal covers, medium and heavy bags. I'm also looking into getting a Pfaff 345 and and/or a flatbed walking foot machine or a Single 30-15 machine. The second or third machine would be for wallets, totes, various cases and linings/interiors. You can see my work here http://www.instagram.com/odinleather.

I definitely welcome your feedback on choice of machines for these purposes. Would a that Pfaff 345 with some sort of flat top attachement work for wallets and totes or should I stick with a true flatbed like a 30-15. I like using 138 and 207 thread weights.

Regarding pressor feet and plates... I don't quite understand yet the pros and cons that the different pressor feet and plate combinations for the 441 machine offer. My 441 machine came with a center-toe pressor foot that is closed (the thread passes through it). It seems some center-toes are open - is this a benefit? Outer pressor foot has a double toe (left and right side). Whats the benefit of changing these pressor feet? Does using a left or right toe offer benefits that I don't understand?

Also... How does one choose the right plate for a project? What unique benefits does a holster plate, or stirrup plate offer that a regular plate does not.

As always ALL your feedback is welcome and appreciated.

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I have a 441 clone and I have all the different plates. They are useful for different operations. The open vs closed center foot isn't as important. Having an open toe does help in the sense that you don't have to thread the thread through the hole. But other than that, either is equivalent. Left toe vs. right toe is useful when you want to sew right up to the edge using a guide. You can sew closer to the right edge using a left toe. The only time I use the right toe is if I'm using the harness plate. The harness plates (at least the one I have) is designed to be used with the right toe. The harness plate elevates the leather so you can sew closer to a bump. I sew handles that is leather wrapped around a rope or some other kind of corp. The harness plate lets me sew right up to the bump in the handle and still sew straight down.

As for a Pfaff 345, I don't have that machine exactly. I have a Pfaff 335 and that machine maxes out at a 138 thread. I had a guy make a flat top attachment for it and it's great. I would say that a cylinder machine with a removeable flattop attachment is always preferable to a flat bed of the same type because it gives you the flexibility to switch and do different operations. The negative is price and availability of attachments. Cylinder beds usually cost more than a comparable flat bed and many times you would have to get a flattop attachment made.

Andrew

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Andrew,

Thanks a lot. Those explanations were very help. It makes sense once you have an example. I think I will get a left-toe press or foot.

About the Pfaff 335... Would you mind sharing a pic of your flat top? What's the smallest thread size for that machine? How's it handle light weight leathers (3-4oz) and canvas? Any perceived issues?

Thanks again.

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You can see an earlier thread about it here:

http://leatherworker.net/forum/index.php?showtopic=47424&hl=%2Bpfaff+%2B335+%2Bflatbed

As for smallest thread, I don't know but I'm sure it can handle pretty small. The smallest thread I use is 69. The thing works just fine on fabric and light weight leathers. It does fine on heavier leathers too, just won't go over a certain thickness and thread size.

Andrew

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I have a SewPro Mini 441 machine that I'm still trying to get up to speed on.

I do a variety of work - passport covers, wallets, belts and straps, journal covers, medium and heavy bags. I'm also looking into getting a Pfaff 345 and and/or a flatbed walking foot machine or a Single 30-15 machine. The second or third machine would be for wallets, totes, various cases and linings/interiors. You can see my work here http://www.instagram.com/odinleather.

I definitely welcome your feedback on choice of machines for these purposes. Would a that Pfaff 345 with some sort of flat top attachement work for wallets and totes or should I stick with a true flatbed like a 30-15. I like using 138 and 207 thread weights.

Regarding pressor feet and plates... I don't quite understand yet the pros and cons that the different pressor feet and plate combinations for the 441 machine offer. My 441 machine came with a center-toe pressor foot that is closed (the thread passes through it). It seems some center-toes are open - is this a benefit? Outer pressor foot has a double toe (left and right side). Whats the benefit of changing these pressor feet? Does using a left or right toe offer benefits that I don't understand?

Also... How does one choose the right plate for a project? What unique benefits does a holster plate, or stirrup plate offer that a regular plate does not.

As always ALL your feedback is welcome and appreciated.

A cylinder walking foot machine like the pfaff 345 would be perfect for your light/medium leather goods like wallets, bags, linings, notebook covers, belts and more. ideally get one with a flatbed attachment and you'll essentially have a 2 in 1 machine (cylinder+flatbed). pfaff 345 will use up to 138 thread. some of the newer cylinder walking foot machines like our Techsew 2700 will use up to 207 thread.

on another note I took a look at your facebook page...nice stuff! probably going to order one of those card holders.

cheers,

Ron

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