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Some Tips On How To Use Antique

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does tan kote work as a resist to antique? Or is Super Shene the best option?

. I like angelus clear acrylic , to me it works much better than Tandys products

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The light color you see on the projects is the natural leather with a finish on it. The antique (stuff in the grooves) is more than likely med brown antique paste by Fiebings or Eco Flo antique gel.

right, I guess my question is how do you keep that natural look? are they blocking out those areas?

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Yep. Many resists out there to do the trick. I have had bad experiences with the product called Block Out. I personally use Resolene/water 50/50. Some others use Wyosheen, Super Sheen etc..

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try wipeing th antq off with a damp finger rag,if not clean enuff try a damp alcohol finger rag then dry and re cover letters with your seal. a finger rag is one finger on a rag lol

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Is it the same results when using Fiebings Antique Gel, waterbased? I have had some VERY different and frustrating results with it...

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I get better results when using the tandy super sheen if I use 2 coats of it as a resist, then let it sit overnight. The acrylic seems to set up better, and the resisted areas turn out brighter. I also do the final wipe-off with a damp paper towel or lint-free rag.

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I get better results when using the tandy super sheen if I use 2 coats of it as a resist, then let it sit overnight. The acrylic seems to set up better, and the resisted areas turn out brighter. I also do the final wipe-off with a damp paper towel or lint-free rag.

I agree totally - If I'm using Super Sheen 2 coats work much better and then let it it over night... Also, if I use a damp paper towel to wipe it off, I fold the towel many times, * I have a firmer piece of flat towel to work with, which will leave more antique in the low spots, and you can also unfold and refold the towel to use up the other cleaner areas of the towel. :)

Iam ok if i am using first the fiebing antique and then tan kote as finish?

Hi kkikoss

This is some Antiquing info I got from Raymond Tipton of duckcreektraders

and this is just some ideas to try, on your journey of learning leatherworking.....

A lot of leatherworking is trial and error, and just finding what works for you - it is not always an exact science.

Something to do is try doing what he says, on a small sample of leather - just to see how it turns out.

Then next time while you are doing this, feel free to make changes or do things differently if you like how it looks.

If I understand your question, it is about the 3rd picture where it says

“I use the Feibings Antique with Tan-Kote at about a 50/50 mix?

* This is to dilute the Antique - which will make it last longer.

** When I use Feibings Antique I use a separate jar to dilute my antique – one for each different color of Antique.

*** Then when I am done with the leather dying/antiquing I put a cote or two of finish on.

I hope this answers your question… ?

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I agree totally - If I'm using Super Sheen 2 coats work much better and then let it it over night... Also, if I use a damp paper towel to wipe it off, I fold the towel many times, * I have a firmer piece of flat towel to work with, which will leave more antique in the low spots, and you can also unfold and refold the towel to use up the other cleaner areas of the towel. :)

Hi kkikoss

This is some Antiquing info I got from Raymond Tipton of duckcreektraders

and this is just some ideas to try, on your journey of learning leatherworking.....

A lot of leatherworking is trial and error, and just finding what works for you - it is not always an exact science.

Something to do is try doing what he says, on a small sample of leather - just to see how it turns out.

Then next time while you are doing this, feel free to make changes or do things differently if you like how it looks.

If I understand your question, it is about the 3rd picture where it says

“I use the Feibings Antique with Tan-Kote at about a 50/50 mix?

* This is to dilute the Antique - which will make it last longer.

** When I use Feibings Antique I use a separate jar to dilute my antique – one for each different color of Antique.

*** Then when I am done with the leather dying/antiquing I put a cote or two of finish on.

I hope this answers your question… ?

Hello , thanks for your time. I make leather straps for wrist.

I use only two products, fiebing antique and fiebing tan kote.

If you can please tell me the exact order of how to use these two products?

I use first the antique finish and then tan kote as finish. Is the order in which I use them correct?

I have read elsewhere that I must use first tan kote then black fiebing antique and finally again tan kote for finally finish.

So is this the ideal way to do it without leaving any black stains (from black antique) on the wrist skin of my client?

Thanks for your time.

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On 8/14/2015 at 8:48 PM, kkikoss said:

Iam ok if i am using first the fiebing antique and then tan kote as finish?

Depends on the product. Attached is what happens when you use Tan Kote over Eco-Flo Antique Gel for a coaster that is exposed to a lot of sweating glasses. Resolene is much more water resistant. 

icm_fullxfull.91075744_i6ikjqgsb88coks80k8s.jpg

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On April 19, 2012 at 0:59 AM, LNLeather said:

 

The rope tool was made by Raymond Tipton of bunkhousetools and he used his emboss roll #164

post-15330-067215600 1334813110_thumb.jp

It is really cool how he did that, because you can't tell where he started and where he ended with the emboss roll.

post-15330-076750300 1334814067_thumb.jp

:thankyou:

Please, feel free to add your tips or pictures too. I learned a lot from this tutorial, and like Bluesman said "The combinations are endless"

It is a stamp .

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post-15330-076750300 1334814067_thumb.jppost-15330-067215600 1334813110_thumb.jp  The rope tool was made by Raymond Tipton of bunkhousetools

and he used his emboss roll #164   :)

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Hey all! Question on antiquing. Is it counter productive to get resist down into all the cuts and background areas? in my brief experience with working leather after  coating the project with resist and letting it dry, I have found that after paste application (making sure to get down into "all the nooks and crannies" of the tooling, when removing the initial coat much of the paste is pulling out of the nooks and crannies. Especially some of the not so deep indentations. Would it be better NOT to get resist down into the areas you are intending to antique?

Wouldn't the antique paste "set" better in those areas not so well resisted? 

In other words.. Just giving a thorough skim coat over the raised highlight areas  and not all the way down into the cuts and valleys of the tooling so as not to have the antique "pull out" when removing the access?  I hope this question has not been posted before. Thanks tom, Queens N.Y.

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Hi all, just curious about the overall process - similar to the question above from tomsleather76. I just bought some fiebing's antiquing yesterday to try my hand at it for the first time. I dove right in and tried it on a couple of small tooled pieces and found that it looked good on the undyed one but didn't seem to do much on the dyed one (I may have just wiped too much off). Then I hopped on YouTube and here and saw people talking about applying a resist first. Is this only if you want to leave some areas lighter, or are you applying it over the whole piece? If over the whole piece (as I seem to be understanding), why? Thanks for the help!

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I know that antiquing is usually done with a darker color than the piece is already dyed, but, I want to sort of reverse the effect. I want the tooled area to be lighter, preferably a silver or gold, to bring up the tooled design. I haven't found any antiquing gel/stain in either of those colors. I tried using acrylic paint, but it stuck to the untooled high areas, as well. My base was dyed, then two coats of Fiebing's Resolene. After that I painted the acrylic paint, let it stand for two minutes, then wiped it off. But it didn't wipe completely wipe off the high areas and when I tried wiping harder it pulled the paint out of the stamped areas. Was two minutes too long? Is acrylic paint the wrong thing to use? Any ideas?

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From my experience, antique is made to stay in the tooled areas which would make them darker, so that is the opposite of what you want. If you used thinned paint (on a test piece, not your actual job), it would hopefully stay in the lower stamped areas, and be polished off the high spots.

Maybe you need to polish with a cloth wrapped around a hard flat piece of glass-timber-bone folder etc (so it is only reaching the paint on the high spots) with some solvent on the cloth.

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