Jump to content
BigMatt

Fileteuse Manuelle (Heated Edge Creaser) On The Cheap

Recommended Posts

I have been looking into this tool off and on for about 6 months. I have been using a digital soldering iron for edge glazing with some success. I thought I would look one more time when I found a pyrography tool from Janik that (I believe) takes the same tips as the Mando unit.

They were so cheap I couldn't keep myself from ordering a couple of them along with the tips used for pyrography. I thought that if the Mando tips fit in the handles, I would splurge for the real tips, use these cheapie handles and hook them up to a 1-18V model train transformer.

Here is the link to the handles: http://www.turners-retreat.co.uk/catalog/product/view/id/4355/s/spare-holder-for-s2-or-s3-pyrography-machine/category/460/

Today I got close enough to being sure this will work that I ordered the 2mm creasing tip. We will see how it works when it comes it, but between the two handles, the yard sale model train transformer and the actual Mando tip, I should be in at under $200.

Here are some pictures of the handle setup and the transformer. I also creased a scrap of caiman with a straight edge and I think I have verified that it will get hot enough.

ckppKFP.jpg

gbjOqLh.jpg

ZNHLDIA.jpg

QeXn6RQ.jpg

tmO18s7.jpg

lFfR0Oi.jpg

Edited by BigMatt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the Regad unit that Mando, FLW and RMLS sell. I found that alligator needs only the lowest setting or it will burn. Maybe my piece of alligator is just cheap and a nicer tanned piece will need more heat. Other leathers need a higher setting.

Looks like you got a good crease.

Edited by thefanninator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use that waterproofing strip stuff on the inside of the pvc covers I make. I needed a mini iron to heat weld it into place, so made an ironing tip out of a large copper nail which fits my variable heat soldering iron.

This post has given me some inspiration for more fittings, many thanks.

Edited by LumpenDoodle2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, it has been a wild ride.

I got the tip from Rocky Mountain Leather Works and it was beautiful. It went together like a dream. The only problem is, my little train transformer wasn't getting hot enough for my liking.

I thought about how to get more power to the tip, and I bought a light dimmer switch. That was a mistake since it immediately overpowered my little (expensive) fileteuse tip and melted the heating element. I ordered some Ni-Chrome wire and got some super high temp electrical tape from an electrical motor repair shop and fixed it. It isn't as pretty as it was when I first got it, but it still works great.

Since the little transformer was too cool and the dimmer was way too hot, I looked around town and found a big train transformer that puts out a peak voltage of 25V (versus 18V). That is more than enough to get the tip hot and will allow me to control the heat.

This setup works, so now I am going to order the wax spatula, and 1.5mm tip. Finally, I think I will make a leather cover for the handles so they don't look so cheap.

All in, I currently have about $250 in everything right now. I will have about $135 in each tip from here on out. It isn't exactly cheap, but it is a lot cheaper than buying the whole machine for around $8-900 with tip. It also feels a lot sturdier than a soldering iron I was using.

There is the album... http://imgur.com/a/JU4oI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Big Matt,

Thanks very much for pioneering this method of heating filet use tips. I've been wanting to get into this for ages, but the combination of high cost and zero instructions held me back. What's the latest on your work with this? I'm wondering which tip to get first. I typically mark a stitch line 1/8" (or about 3mm) from the edge. Is that the right distance for the F2, which I read lays down a crease 1.5mm from the edge. Then it looks like the stitch line sits just inside? Deos this sound right? Any help along this line would be appreciated.

D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice, you can crease both forward and rewerse:) Joke aside, the temperature control is more important than how the tip looks itself. If it's only for heat treating with Italian style edge paint. When it comes to creasing that's an other story of course. I went around this problem when I started using the latest style of Italian edge paint from Giardini http://www.leatheredgepaint.com/

This edge paint do not need any heat treatment, it only requires correction by sanding (if any at all). No need for expensive equipment and to a even better result. It's easy to use and gives a very strong beautiful result. They even give you a free sample if you pay the postage your self (it's a huge sample) applied by a small machine or hand applicator (pic on their site, I bought them both) on any kind of leather, very good on chrome tan leathers. I have tried it out for some time now and I am very happy with the result.

I can only advice to try out this solution before buying any expensive new tools. And you can buy as small as 250 Ml, so there are no big investments in trying it out.

Just my 2 cents

Tor

Edited by Trox

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have some pics of the Giardini edge paint?

I have Fenice, Stahl and Fine Leatherworking's brand (not sure of their manufacturer). So far Fenice seems to be my favorite. It seems to have the hardest finish with no peeling even after several coats. I've used it with and without heat treating. I have the Regad unit from RMLS.

The hardest thing to do is get that center line to disappear and get rid of bubbles.

If Beraud were easier to get in the States I'd give it a try.

Edited by thefanninator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have some pics of the Giardini edge paint?

I have Fenice, Stahl and Fine Leatherworking's brand (not sure of their manufacturer). So far Fenice seems to be my favorite. It seems to have the hardest finish with no peeling even after several coats. I've used it with and without heat treating. I have the Regad unit from RMLS.

The hardest thing to do is get that center line to disappear and get rid of bubbles.

If Beraud were easier to get in the States I'd give it a try.

I am not in my shop before end of next week, I suppose I could post some pictures then. Of course there are pics on their site. This paint is special good on chrome tan when you cannot do any thing with the edge, it build up an finished rounded edge. By adding two or more layer paint and a top finishing cote. The paint are very thick and will create a finish rounded edge, and it's very strong. I have used it on dog collars with allot of mechanical stress, it's strong as molded plastic. The leather will wear out before it. The colors are great and in many variations, you can have them to mix your own. As I mentioned above, you can try it out by paying for the postage alone. I bought the small manual machine http://www.leatheredgepaint.com/product-category/tools/ and the hand applicator. The machine will need the thicker "dence" paint and are great on belts and long straps. The hand applicator (Tandy and Campbell Randall sell them as well) will use semi dence paint and are useful on most things. Trying to use the paint with out any of those tools will not give the right result. However, a small rounded awl or such will work fine on small items . I have used it on rounded we tan leather edges as well, you will only need one layer here because the rounded edge shape are already present. What I can say, it looks good are easy to apply and are very strong.

Tor

Edited by Trox

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the center line is visible here after one or two layer (normally not) you will only sand (rub) the edge a little and apply an other layer of paint. It covers very good because it's thick. Never seen a bubble yet.

Tor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Tor, for the Giardini suggestion. I will follow-up on that for sure. Anything that could hasten a high-quality finish is worth a look. Like Thefanninator, I use Fenice with and without heat, depending on circumstances. It's a big step up from the Edge Kote I started with. I like the possibility of using a crease and so will try one or two filetuse tips, as long as Big Matt's affordable heat source pans out, and I'm sure it will.

Thanks to all contributors for this excellent thread.

Fanninator, what is your take on the best tip for my stitch line at 3mm from the edge? I see people using the F2. What is your setup? Do you stitch just beyond the crease?

Thanks,

Dale

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got the F2. At first I thought it was too close to the edge but after using it for a few months I think it's great for small accessories...wallets, pockets, card cases, key fobs.

A 2.5 might be nice for larger items like briefcase and duffles...but you can get by with the F2 for those too.

Yes, I stitch just beyond the crease.

Pic attached of pockets creased with F2, 7 spi. It takes some practice to do curves, just tilt the tip on one end.

post-43646-0-50323200-1443408557_thumb.j

Edited by thefanninator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For creasing I prefer my old stock USA made HF/CS Osborn, and I heat them with a small electric finishing stove. I feel I have better control with the temperature this way (the stove are made for leather finishing) Than my inexpensive termostat controlled soldering iron with creasing bits. The soldering iron will work for heat treatment of edge paint, but are to inaccurate for creasing. That will need an accurat temperature control and those are expensive. The shape of the old stock creases are also better and easier to work with.

Tor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got the F2 and it seems to be the right distance from the edge. I tend to mark my stitch line at 1/8" and I might end up getting the F1.5.

I will also need to get the paint spatula. I have been using the side of the edge creaser, and while it works great, it makes the tool look pretty bad.

I recommend this method to anyone who is slightly adventurous, mechanically inclined, and wants to use the real fileteuse tips on their leather work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great! Let us know how it goes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BigMatt,

If you are out there, I could use a hand. I picked up the F2 tip and plugged it into Wall Lenk voltage regulator (probably not the right term) and fried the wire -- same as I think you did early on. Would you be willing to repair it for me? I'm happy to pay, of course.

Dale

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any idea what the temperatures are for glazing with Fenice? When I heat treat, it's changing the color and I'm not getting an even finish. Can't tell if I'm running it too high or too low.

Edited by izmarkie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not an expert on this topic, but I'll pass along my experience: I think Fenice is a good product, especially when applied as thickly as possible using one of the brass roller tools made for this purpose, then sanded between coats to shape the edge and remove flaws. In my experience, only low temperatures and numerous fairly quick strokes of the glazing tool heat Fenice so it flows enough to correct small flaws. Higher temperatures blister the finish. In both scenarios, it has changed color. Sometimes it has been a small change that looks OK after a coat of wax. In general, however, I've been happiest with the color of Fenice without heat. At times, I've shaped the edge finish with a glazing tool, sanded lightly and reapplied a final coat that dried without flaws. Campbell-Randall sells this stuff, and they are very helpful on the phone. You might ring them to talk it over. I'm also experimenting with a different edge finish from RML. It's has a waxy feel and seems to flow easier than Fenice to correct flaws. The chocolate brown color (beautiful!) I've tried also changes color with heat, but adding wax (I've tried beeswax and parrafin) seems to help. In a few experiments, I like this one best without heat after the final coat, as with Fenice.

If there's somebody out there who is an expert at using the fileteuse manuelle and glazing edges, please enlighten us! Maybe somebody at RML and Fine Leatherworking would be able and willing to produce and post tutorials. Hope so. I, for one, would patronize a business that helps customers learn these things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the same boat. After a couple days of experimentation, I think I will use heat on the first coat or two to encourage adherence, then sand and apply more coats without heat to ensure that it's even.

I couldn't consistently get an even surface, but the heat definitely seems to help it stick. After making a dimmer box and trying different soldering tips, I think I may just try a cheap, teflon-coated iron to see if that works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...