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Skald

Rubberlike Edge Coating, What Is It?

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I have a Timberland wallet, which I have been using for the last 4 years or so. It's made out of really thin suede, and has this "rubberlike" edge coating, which seems really durable and strong. There isn't a single crack or other signs of "tear and wear" on the edges, even though the wallet itself starts to look very vintage (but fine).

My question is, does anyone know what might have been used for this? I can't seem to find any products that sound like the same thing - and I really would like to use that for some future projects, and not end up with something of lesser quality than this. Unfortunately, I can't get any photos of it to my computer, so I can't show any pics of it. :(

Edited by Skald

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Take a look at Fiebing's Duracoat.

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...and has this "rubberlike" edge coating, which seems really durable and strong...my question is, does anyone know what might have been used for this?

I've been experimenting with some acrylic mediums and have a little PDF file on what I have found:

edge_finishes_for_chrome_tanned_leather.pdf

There is a particular acrylic medium (Clear Tar Gel) that does have a rubber like feel to it. All the acrylic mediums can be simply colored with acrylic paints (ie. black, brown) or left clear.

Bob Stelmack

www.pslac.org

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Thanks for the input.

Fiebing's product is called "Dura Edge" it seems? Duracoat is that thing you cover guns and knives etc. with, if I am not all wrong? ;)

Does anybody know if it works on these finer edges? On this wallet I mentioned, it's a matter or like 2 mm's of edge in total, including the suede (or nubuck?) and the nylon interior lining etc. So it must be much like silicone or something like that.

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oops!!!!

Yeah, dura edge.

Although, I bet duraCOAT on leather would be pretty resistant to damage!`

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oops!!!!

Yeah, dura edge.

Although, I bet duraCOAT on leather would be pretty resistant to damage!`

Hahaha, I must try it sometime, at least on a scrap bit and see how it works - might be "the new black". ;)

I'll try this Dura Edge anyway, next time I order stuff. It might very well be that I take time to make a proper folded edge anyway, instead of this weird one. But it have indeed caught my attention, that it have lasted this good over all this years. I had a iPod-case with a similar weird compound on the edges, and it was devastated and almost completely worn away after a little more than a year. Not very impressing.

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I bought some of the dura edge to try. I haven't had it on anything long enough to tell how well its going to hold up, but so far so good. It comes with a big dauber as an applicator, but I've used cotton swabs when applying to smaller/thinner edges.

The more coats you put on the better it looks. Hope this helped in some way.

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I pursued something very similar a few years ago. I wasn't building wallets but watch straps so the edge is very small like the one you're wanting to do. I found a few companies that sell the machines that apply this coating. The machine's are a few hundred bucks and the raw material is reasonable as well. However, I ended up not going down that path for a few reasons. That stuff can cover up any imperfections but I really like to showcase the edges.....IMO this is an area where you can tell the beginners from the experts. :) Also, I think it somewhat cheapens the product in some cases. I've noticed a lot of mass produced items use this rubberized coating technique. Just my 2 cents.

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Here is a picture I found on the internet that shows the rubberized coating you're talking about. This is NOT one of my straps....and I'm not sure who manufacturers this one....but here you go:

H18Y240064-1.jpg

Here is another one:

b5-1.jpg

Edited by Frogman Watch Straps

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That's probably just Feibing's Edge Kote. I use it all the time and it gives that rubbery, shiny appearance.

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That's probably just Feibing's Edge Kote. I use it all the time and it gives that rubbery, shiny appearance.

Nope, this stuff is different....I actually have a strap that came from overseas and the coating is rubber based...it's applied with a machine that heats up the coating.

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I'll try to locate such a machine, sounds like an "investment" for future use. Until then, I guess I'll stick to folding/sewing edges instead. I don't want to be an amateur told apart from the experts. ;)

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anyone have a link to a machine that does that kind of coating? Im trying to make wallets and wouldnt mind getting one of those machines that give that kind of coating... Definitely looks more mass produced than a hand finished edge, but suits my purposes.

I attach a picture of a card holder that I have that has this kind of "rubberised" coating. Its actually quite flexible, so it stands up to folding etc....

I've tried googling for "rubber edge leather finisher", "rubber edge coating machine leather" and various permutations of resin etc. Can't seem to find the relevant search term...

Many thanks all :)

post-25037-036268600 1321192521_thumb.jp

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You can by an edge dying roller from tandy and put dura edge in it. I dont use this kind of stuff ever, but that seems like the easiest way to get that type of edge to me...

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I've been searching for the same machine but can't find anything close. I recall watching a YouTube video of this machine but unfortunately can find it now. It's definitely a "hot edge coating plastic/polyurethane/rubber" applied by a machine; definitely not edge cote etc. let's keep this search going. -ben

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just thought i would put this out there:

I've been seeing a similar product used in videos for dangerous9 straps and ciprys morpho leather goods. It goes on liquid and is then melted and moved around with a wood burner or heated nail. This filled cracks and is very durable.

In my search for this, I ran into the inks used for textile printing: specifically the heat fixed inks such as plastisol. This is a gelled vinyl resin that cures fabric soft, it just doesn't ever 'dry' without heat application) with the application of heat, 350F from one video I viewed. I will give it a try on a watch strap project I will be working on later this month.

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Lekoza is a memeber here and sells this stuff.

I bought a bottle to use on chrome tanned leather and its rubber like. It sticks even to the Horween and looks and feels like rubber to me. There is a YouTube video on the stuff and he sells on EBay. Pretty sure there is a web site for lekoza leather.

I don't care for it because it looks very un leather like to me. More like rubber paint. I did a small notebook cover in it that I carry everyday and it holds up good, I just don't care for the look of it so I didn't even try to pursue making it look better or neater.

I'm not saying it's not good stuff I just don't care for the look. I obviously have ordered from the site and had good service and the products were as advertised.

http://lekoza.com/

This is from the eBay ad.

Giardini edge paints are the ideal acrylic paints for the edges of your leather products. These paints have been designed to provide the highest performance with respect to adhesion, coverage, camber, and strength. Containing less than 1% VOC; it is the most eco-friendly leather edge paint product line on the market today. Can be mixed with water up to 10% by volume to achieve a thinner consistency. Produced by Giardini Group of Italy, in collaboration with Stahl. Do not allow to freeze

Edited by Oldtoolsniper

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You can get one from Campbell Randall its called the "BF110 Hot Glazing Station". Its like a soldering iron on steriods and you can buy different tips. You will then use the type of edge paint that fine leatherworking or Lekoza sells. It gives you that "rubber like" edge that is used in european style leather goods. I had the Campbell Randall station for a little while and it works great.

BF110-750x750.jpg

Edited by jk215

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Skald, I have been searching for this as well.  Through a lot of trial and error, I can tell you that the Tandy stuff is not it.

Look at Giardini Edge Paint  http://lekoza.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=57

My Coach bags have that rubbery thick edge coat and it's awesome.  I tried all that Tandy stuff I was told would turn out the same and it doesn't. 

If you want it glossy, they have a coating for gloss.  Otherwise it's good as is out of the bottle. 

This site has the edge burner (their own, not the Campbel Randall which sells for $225.00 and they sell what they call "Electric edge creasing iron" for $49.95.

http://lekoza.com/Tools/ElectricEdgeMolder

Edited by MarlysRae
forgot to add something.

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Fenice leather edge paint and similar professional brands are based on synthetic polymers, so they are in a sense a plastic. Most major fashion houses and high end brands use this for their goods. The main reason is that most use chrome tanned leather and this doesn't burnish, but it's not unusual to see veg tan with painted edges too. The reasons for this is mostly down to production, as larger manufacturers rely on machinery, including 'edge paint machines' for their leather goods. Among crafters the use of painting edges often have a bad reputation and many accuse cheap brands covering up low quality leather and vinyl with paint. And while this is not entirely untrue, the fact remains that in some instances there are no alternatives, and done well - it can look amazing. And contrary to general belief, it's actually as much work if not more, to do well - compared to burnishing veg tan.

For a long time these professional paints were difficult to get hold of unless you bought it wholesale (there are quite a few threads here about the subject) but Tandy did stock it for a while in 250ml (here in the UK they have unfortunately discontinued it) and in my opinion was one of the few good things they had to offer. And a quite a few smaller online shops offer these and similar brands as well, in small quantities.

Like with everything else, it's not magical stuff and takes some practice to master. You do not need any electrical edge creaser, just apply thin layers ( I find it easier to use a cocktail stick and roll on the paint than to use a brush), let it dry and harden in between (at least an hour, preferably longer) sand it with fine (dry) wet sandpaper/ 600-1000 grit, apply another layer, repeat until you're satisfied (in my experience you're good if you can do it with 3 layers), let it harden for 24 hours and rub/polish it with your favorite wax formula. Also, an open bottle of paint is more or less worthless after a year to one and half, as oxygen deteriorate the binding qualities of the paint.

If you apply it too thick or are restless and start sanding it too soon, you'll end up with a rubber like goo of a mess.

Good Luck, and remember to practice on some scrap first.

Edited by ConradPark

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I use fenice edge paint. I think it comes out pretty decently.

DSC01121.jpg

Edited by MudBugWill

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I used a product from a company in India called Chemi-Co. The edge ink or edge paint they are selling is pretty good. Dont remember the name of their product. mail them up and check. Got full finish like rubber in just 1 coat. better than Fenice or Vernis hands down. Also dried in 3 minutes. Try It!:yeah:

chemicosales@gmail.com

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On 5/8/2011 at 9:03 PM, TwinOaks said:

oops!!!!

Yeah, dura edge.

Although, I bet duraCOAT on leather would be pretty resistant to damage!`

Its the same product from Chemi co.. i have the pictures attached. try mailing them, forgot their product name.

chemicosales@gmail.com

 

bag chem.png

belt chem.png

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On 5/26/2011 at 8:20 PM, Frogman Watch Straps said:

I pursued something very similar a few years ago. I wasn't building wallets but watch straps so the edge is very small like the one you're wanting to do. I found a few companies that sell the machines that apply this coating. The machine's are a few hundred bucks and the raw material is reasonable as well. However, I ended up not going down that path for a few reasons. That stuff can cover up any imperfections but I really like to showcase the edges.....IMO this is an area where you can tell the beginners from the experts. :) Also, I think it somewhat cheapens the product in some cases. I've noticed a lot of mass produced items use this rubberized coating technique. Just my 2 cents.

Hi Im not sure Hermes would agree with this since they also use section lacquer.

To the OP, Giardini or Fenice is where you need to look for this product.

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