jeeperaz

Question About English Style Strap End Punches

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I want to make some belts in various sizes ranging between 1" and 2".

Because the punches are so expensive, I would rather not buy a separate punch for a 1", one for a 1- 1/4", a 1-1/2"... all the way to 2".

For example, I was curious what type of end a 2" punch would leave on a 1.5" belt?

Hope that makes sense. Do I just need to bite the bullet and order the all of the sizes or can I get by with a bigger punch on a smaller strap? Thoughts?

Also, anyone have opinions on best bang for the buck when it comes to buying a specific brand (other than craftool)?

Thanks

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I want to make some belts in various sizes ranging between 1" and 2".

Because the punches are so expensive, I would rather not buy a separate punch for a 1", one for a 1- 1/4", a 1-1/2"... all the way to 2".

For example, I was curious what type of end a 2" punch would leave on a 1.5" belt?

Hope that makes sense. Do I just need to bite the bullet and order the all of the sizes or can I get by with a bigger punch on a smaller strap? Thoughts?

Also, anyone have opinions on best bang for the buck when it comes to buying a specific brand (other than craftool)?

Thanks

I agree totally - but sadly it's a false economy

IF you decide to use punches, you WILL need one of each size

The Stohlman brand seem good

BUT - there IS a way to make the same shape on the belt end by hand - difficult to describe in text

PM me if you want to know more & I'll try to do some pics or diagrams to explain

Jon

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I must have cut thousands of strap ends and have done them all using just a head knife.

I have made quite a few templates out of thin tin (used cans) for each type of end (church window, blunt, point, etc) in each size.

I still make the odd asymmentrical screw-up but can usually finesse it back to looking right.

I thought about strap end punches but for the range I would need it would work out horrendously expensive.

Just my tuppence.

Gary

Edited by gary

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I am with Gary. I use a template and freehand cutting them out. I have tried using a larger strap end cutter on a smaller belt. I ended up recutting it because it doesn't come out aesthetically pleasing. I use a disc sander to finish shape the ends sometimes too. I get disapproving looks from some for using the sander but I use it sparingly and don't burn the edge when I do it. I made my templates from poster-presentation board they seem to be lasting ok so far. Good luck!

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As Jon says, it's necessary to use the right size of English point punch for the width of strap.

My illustration shows the result of using a 2" punch on a 2" belt, and below it, the same size punch used on a 1½" belt. It creates a very uncomfortable angle where the punch intersects the strap, which no amount of recutting will correct.

I make templates from old lithographic printing plates, about .008" thick, which can be cut to shape with sharp scissors. It's then easy to scribe a line on the strap with a scratch awl, and cut the curve with a head knife or round knife.

The second illustration shows the construction of a true English point. The diameter of the circles is the same as the width of the strap. This can be carried out on the litho plate before cutting, using sharp dividers, or on heavy card using compasses.

English point.jpg

English point construction.jpg

post-7199-12646062608_thumb.jpg

post-7199-126460627656_thumb.jpg

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As Jon says, it's necessary to use the right size of English point punch for the width of strap.

My illustration shows the result of using a 2" punch on a 2" belt, and below it, the same size punch used on a 1½" belt. It creates a very uncomfortable angle where the punch intersects the strap, which no amount of recutting will correct.

I make templates from old lithographic printing plates, about .008" thick, which can be cut to shape with sharp scissors. It's then easy to scribe a line on the strap with a scratch awl, and cut the curve with a head knife or round knife.

The second illustration shows the construction of a true English point. The diameter of the circles is the same as the width of the strap. This can be carried out on the litho plate before cutting, using sharp dividers, or on heavy card using compasses.

Everyone, thanks for your time replying to this post. Some good ideas for me to try.

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