akozicki

Production Of Baseball Glove And Leather Six Pack

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Hope all is well with everyone!

I figured I would upload a segment of the process in producing a couple of my product lines. (DNA Glove & Leather Six Pack)

Creating a glove was the first leather project I started back in 2012. After spending over three years messing around with new product ideas concerning leather, producing a glove entirely by hand from scratch isn't as overwhelming as what it used to be.

There's not that much info on this site about what exactly it takes to produce a glove. Hopefully one day baseball & softball gloves will have their own section on the site!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPjpGppQ2gM&feature=youtu.be

http://www.kozickicorp.com

Alec

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Alec,

It's very nice to meet you and talk to someone who is not only crafting gloves, but someone who understands the process and what it takes to produce it. Do you do all the die-cutting of the leather yourself? Do you make your own laces and welting leather? I did check out your website yesterday and will do so again to familiarize myself. I look forward to hearing from you!

Best Regards,

Michael Sacco

Founder

Sacco Sports

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Alec,

It's very nice to meet you and talk to someone who is not only crafting gloves, but someone who understands the process and what it takes to produce it. Do you do all the die-cutting of the leather yourself? Do you make your own laces and welting leather? I did check out your website yesterday and will do so again to familiarize myself. I look forward to hearing from you!

Best Regards,

Michael Sacco

Founder

Sacco Sports

Hey Michael,

There are several methods to creating a glove, the trick is producing them with the highest profit margin possible. Die cutting is not the best route to go down because for each model you would need a set of dies. I produce the gloves entirely by hand. I start with a vegetable tanned hide and then I trace the pieces onto the bottom side of the leather (I'll upload a video of this beginning step sometime). Once the templates are traced, I cut every piece out by hand and punch out every hole by hand as well. To produce a glove completely by hand, it takes 3 days of work with two phases of downtime for dying and conditioning.

The other way I produce gloves is using a computer integrated laser engraver. This way is by far the quickest and produces the optimal yield per leather hide. The only downfall about this method is that a bulk-amount of gloves have to be produced at once. In order for this method to have the best profit margin, over 40 gloves have to be cut-out during one order.

I use latigo lace and I get it by the spool, it's a lot cheaper than purchasing precut 144" laces. For welting lace, I have used latigo lace as a substitute of welt in the past. But after this batch of ten gloves are produced using either no welt or latigo welt, I will be integrating actual welting lace into the gloves that is purchased by the spool.

If you ever want to talk on the phone about leatherwork or baseball, feel free to give me a call whenever! My number is on my site.

Alec Kozicki

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This is awesome to see some ball gloves on here. I have always loved leather, and especially love great ball gloves. My dad worked with leather, mostly saddles, tack, holsters, etc, a lot and owned a couple industrial sewing machines for leather work. We had plans to make a ball glove as a fun project about 3 years ago, but both procrastinated getting started. He was diagnosed with lung cancer a couple years and passed away this past February. My step mother sold most of his leather tools, but left one of the sewing machines to sell to help make repairs to my rent house that they lived in. I was searching this site initially to try to find a buyer for the machine, but seeing these gloves has me considering keeping the machine and starting our project. Not sure, though, as it is a fairly valuable machine and kind of an expensive "toy" for someone as inexperienced as I am. Anyhow, I look forward to reviewing the information here to help me in my decision.

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