Sanch

Tippmann boss

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Yea, so I don't really see alot of activity or posts about this little do dad what gives ?its either great or junk? I have read few reviews and of course most are positive but that may be mularchy (sp) also what happened to the outlaw? I don't need a big ol electric monster nor do I care to learn to be a seamstress. Cast iron and aluminum  both had great reviews and some naysayers too.. who here is using one exclusively and what for? I  am ass u ming thread size can be either larger or smaller dependant on what is being stitched ie. wallets=small, holsters=larger etc etc.... if you own one please chime in!!!

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There are a few guys and Gals round here that own and use them so you should here back from some. 

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I'll get in here, . . . mine has been a "new" aluminum, . . . from 2005 or 2006, . . . somewhere back there.

I use it for whatever I make out of leather, . . . if it needs sewn, . . . except vests, . . . different machine for that.

Look on my website for examples, . . . page 3 to be specific, . . . it sews everything up to and including 3/4 inch of dry veggie tanned leather, . . . although not too well on the 3/4 inch stuff.  I use it to punch the holes in those things, . . . then hand stitch it.

I live 2 hours from the factory, . . . whenever I have a problem (happened twice so far), . . . that I cannot fix myself, . . . I load it up, . . . call em and give em a heads up, . . . one of the mechanics cleans off a bench, . . . fixes my machine, . . . 2 hours later I am back home sewing again (or taking a nap).  The Tippmann people are great people to work with.

The other day I finished a belt that was darn near 3/8 of an inch thick, . . . for a feller that is in the 44 in waist area, . . . all in about 20 minutes, . . . at almost 6 stitches per inch, . . . total sewing was something over 100 inches.

I use everything from 207 thread to 415, . . . but 346 is my mainstay, . . . very seldom use anything else.

A happy customer???  Yessir, . . . I am, . . . and if I could go back and buy a different machine, . . . I most likely would not do it, . . . this one does what I want, where I want it, and the way I want it, . . . electrics do not always do that.

May God bless,

Dwight

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15 minutes ago, Dwight said:

I'll get in here, . . . mine has been a "new" aluminum, . . . from 2005 or 2006, . . . somewhere back there.

I use it for whatever I make out of leather, . . . if it needs sewn, . . . except vests, . . . different machine for that.

Look on my website for examples, . . . page 3 to be specific, . . . it sews everything up to and including 3/4 inch of dry veggie tanned leather, . . . although not too well on the 3/4 inch stuff.  I use it to punch the holes in those things, . . . then hand stitch it.

I live 2 hours from the factory, . . . whenever I have a problem (happened twice so far), . . . that I cannot fix myself, . . . I load it up, . . . call em and give em a heads up, . . . one of the mechanics cleans off a bench, . . . fixes my machine, . . . 2 hours later I am back home sewing again (or taking a nap).  The Tippmann people are great people to work with.

The other day I finished a belt that was darn near 3/8 of an inch thick, . . . for a feller that is in the 44 in waist area, . . . all in about 20 minutes, . . . at almost 6 stitches per inch, . . . total sewing was something over 100 inches.

I use everything from 207 thread to 415, . . . but 346 is my mainstay, . . . very seldom use anything else.

A happy customer???  Yessir, . . . I am, . . . and if I could go back and buy a different machine, . . . I most likely would not do it, . . . this one does what I want, where I want it, and the way I want it, . . . electrics do not always do that.

May God bless,

Dwight

Dwight, your input is greatly appreciated I will look on your site thanks!! Fantastic work sir if you are doing it all with that lil dude I'd say it's pretty dang sweet!

Edited by Sanch

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I bought one of the original cast iron Boss stitchers when they first came out.  There was a bit of a learning curve with getting thread tension and a couple of other minor quirks.  After I figured it out, it worked well and did pretty much what I wanted it to do.  It paid for itself quickly and was a whole lot faster than hand stitching.  I eventually upgraded to a Juki/Ferdco pro 2000, but I still use the Boss for small projects.

One comment about Tippmann customer service.  It is first rate!  I needed a new center presser foot for the machine.  Called the factory and they shipped one right out.  Only problem was that it didn't work.  It was made for their newer machines - which had subtle changes from my old model.  Long story short - they machined a new part for me that fit perfectly.  Too many other outfits will just say, "sorry your machine is no longer made and parts are not available".

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2 hours ago, supercub said:

I bought one of the original cast iron Boss stitchers when they first came out.  There was a bit of a learning curve with getting thread tension and a couple of other minor quirks.  After I figured it out, it worked well and did pretty much what I wanted it to do.  It paid for itself quickly and was a whole lot faster than hand stitching.  I eventually upgraded to a Juki/Ferdco pro 2000, but I still use the Boss for small projects.

One comment about Tippmann customer service.  It is first rate!  I needed a new center presser foot for the machine.  Called the factory and they shipped one right out.  Only problem was that it didn't work.  It was made for their newer machines - which had subtle changes from my old model.  Long story short - they machined a new part for me that fit perfectly.  Too many other outfits will just say, "sorry your machine is no longer made and parts are not available".

Great to know thank you!!

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I don't own one, but I always liked the concept.  A simple machine, with a small footprint that can sew really heavy leather.  My first issue was, wow they are really expensive, even used they are typically average $800, however if its the right tool for the job then who care what it costs.  The second issue was a crank arm vs. a foot pedal.  Most of the time I wish I had a few more hands to help me out, so loosing one hand to cranking is a drawback for me.  I think I would have bought one of these if it had come in a foot pedal kick-press version.  Then I can just stamp out the stiches and use both hands.  My last point would be speed, since you crank-out the stiches they are not very fast but if your not concerned with speed of production its no big deal. 

 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, Yetibelle said:

I don't own one, but I always liked the concept.  A simple machine, with a small footprint that can sew really heavy leather.  My first issue was, wow they are really expensive, even used they are typically average $800, however if its the right tool for the job then who care what it costs.  The second issue was a crank arm vs. a foot pedal.  Most of the time I wish I had a few more hands to help me out, so loosing one hand to cranking is a drawback for me.  I think I would have bought one of these if it had come in a foot pedal kick-press version.  Then I can just stamp out the stiches and use both hands.  My last point would be speed, since you crank-out the stiches they are not very fast but if your not concerned with speed of production its no big deal. 

 

 

 

Yep and yep!

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I wouldn't know who to direct you to, but I think there was a guy that sold one here not to long ago, that made some type of modification that allowed for operation  with something other than the slot machine handle.  Now if were me and it had a few bells and could make a wheel go round that looked like oranges and cherries I could yank on that handle like a mad man.:huh:  

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2 hours ago, OLDNSLOW said:

I wouldn't know who to direct you to, but I think there was a guy that sold one here not to long ago, that made some type of modification that allowed for operation  with something other than the slot machine handle.  Now if were me and it had a few bells and could make a wheel go round that looked like oranges and cherries I could yank on that handle like a mad man.:huh:  

LMAO it took me a minute to get the reference I'm a little slow tonight I guess

Edited by Sanch

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If a feller had a couple weeks he didn't know what else to do with, . . . I really think the boss could be changed over to a "air over oil" cylinder operation quite easily, . . . with a rocker pedal for the foot, . . . and a sliding air switch and second cylinder on the presser foot, . . . he could keep both hands on the leather, . . . and just as fast as he could rock that foot of his, . . . he could do stitches.

BUT, . . . my way, . . . the arm gets tired, . . . it's time for Hershey's and coffee, . . . 

May God bless,

Dwight

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Wouldn't it be easy to convert it to a foot pedal operation by attaching a push-rod to the main handle and a crank at the bottom of the push-rod, attached to a pedal.

Like a crankshaft - cam operating over-head/side valves in an engine via a pushrod, only just one set rather than 16?

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6 hours ago, Dwight said:

If a feller had a couple weeks he didn't know what else to do with, . . . I really think the boss could be changed over to a "air over oil" cylinder operation quite easily, . . . with a rocker pedal for the foot, . . . and a sliding air switch and second cylinder on the presser foot, . . . he could keep both hands on the leather, . . . and just as fast as he could rock that foot of his, . . . he could do stitches.

BUT, . . . my way, . . . the arm gets tired, . . . it's time for Hershey's and coffee, . . . 

May God bless,

Dwight

I'm sure there are many ways the machine could be modified but for the cost of any mods you may as well purchase an electric monster....

 

6 hours ago, fredk said:

Wouldn't it be easy to convert it to a foot pedal operation by attaching a push-rod to the main handle and a crank at the bottom of the push-rod, attached to a pedal.

Like a crankshaft - cam operating over-head/side valves in an engine via a pushrod, only just one set rather than 16?

 again modifying the thing wouldn't be cost effective and would void any type of warranties  as you'd likely change torque and tortion points 

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The Cowboy "OUTLAW" machine will be available in October. It is a similar machine that has many improvements to the point where it is being Patented.

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I have a BOSS and have been very pleased with it. It's not fast, which I like, but it will literally sew anything you want. I've sewn everything from canvas to saddle skirts, and it has worked very well. The service is absolutely the best in the business. My one complaint is that you never have a free hand when sewing. Especially on something like a saddle skirt, I sometimes have to get another person to work the handle while I keep things straight. It seems like lots of folks think they are an inferior machine, but I would certainly disagree. It's a machine I will never get rid of, because it's just to darn handy to have standing in the corner.

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I own and use one (though not nearly as often as I would like - hence it is up for sale) and it is a great machine, takes up very little space, had lots of easy to change accessories, EXCELLENT support service when needed. Mine is the aluminium version and just make it that much easier to move around as far as I can tell. Definitely a learning curve even when going back to it after a long time away but once set up fro the task at hand it does it thing as it is supposed to. I agree (and have dreamt of) the idea of modifying it mechanically to cycle by some other source of energy than my arm... mostly to free a hand up fro the work. Like Dwight when I get tired I just take a break.

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1 hour ago, OldNews said:

I have a BOSS and have been very pleased with it. It's not fast, which I like, but it will literally sew anything you want. I've sewn everything from canvas to saddle skirts, and it has worked very well. The service is absolutely the best in the business. My one complaint is that you never have a free hand when sewing. Especially on something like a saddle skirt, I sometimes have to get another person to work the handle while I keep things straight. It seems like lots of folks think they are an inferior machine, but I would certainly disagree. It's a machine I will never get rid of, because it's just to darn handy to have standing in the corner.

  Every tool has its use, I think the BOSS gets picked on because it's in the $1200-$1400 price range and there are many used and new sewing options (with motors) that compete in that space.  So from that mindset we want to compare them directly against one and other. While the BOSS is really in a category by itself. I love all heavy stitchers and if I had the money and the space would have them all. 

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I don't really have a dog in this fight, but.....

My problem is the price range they are in. With no motor or table I can't see them being worth much more than 6 or 700.00. 

I just don't see it (and I know the market will bear what the market will bear).

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1 hour ago, bikermutt07 said:

I don't really have a dog in this fight, but.....

My problem is the price range they are in. With no motor or table I can't see them being worth much more than 6 or 700.00. 

I just don't see it (and I know the market will bear what the market will bear).

Fight isn't really the right analogy... comparison match maybe but this is in a class of its own really. More like looking at melons and blue berries... both technically berries and you can eat them but...

Yes it is a stitching machine but past that not really like any other.

I takes almost no space when not in use, needs no power (i.e. can travel with you if you have a cottage, camp, vacation spot etc.) - one owner I know goes to horse shows and does on the spot tack repair from the back of his truck... and I have seen them fitted with a small table top which helps with the one hand operation. They also have OEM side guide which also helps.. One of the main things is it will really go through 3/4 inch of hide.. really...  either just as a whole lunch or to run the stitch in,

NO motor to fail, no electronics/servos, no belts/clutches all mechanical points of failure, all mean maintenance and cost of ownership long term. Boss will suffer some mechanical wear over time and constant use but then you swap out a mechanical part at home.

So lots of unique features/benefits and needs to be assessed for what IT is and offers and do you want it for that and the price. I don't think you will make a decision comparing it to electric table, cylinder, post or otherwise.

They have been on the market for years so there seems to be a market...  really the question is simple - are you in the market for one and what it does or not.... and many of us have more than one stitcher anyhow not counting our 2 hands.

Having said all that now I don't want to sell mine even though I need the money!

Sanch let us know where you land on you question/decision and then what you think based on your experience with it you go for it..

 

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Those are all valid points, Plink. When I see some items that have long paid for r&d something in my brain just can't bring me to pay what retail will still demand.

I call it my "ar syndrome". The technology has been paid for for 50+ years and I can't imagine a stock ar should retail for more than 400.00. But yet people are still shelling out 700.00 daily for them. And I still don't own one.

Maybe I'm just a cheap skate when it comes to somethings.

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I now own a Tippman Boss, and the main reasons for buying it, as have already been mentioned, are the small footprint, and the sewing thickness.   The fact that I can easily take it outside on a sunny day also wins brownie points.

Yes, I could have bought an electric powered machine, but I do not have the space, and the majority of machines available in the UK, just won't look at 3/4" leather, without a hefty price tag.

As I have said, space is at a premium, and when I bought the Boss, it was with the understanding that it wouldn't be getting a massive amount of use.   So filling my little workshop with a gallumpin' great expensive monster which might only be used once a week, could not be justified.   

In a workshop measuring 3 metres by just over 2 metres, anything that saves me floorspace is worth every penny to me.

 

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1 hour ago, LumpenDoodle2 said:

I now own a Tippman Boss, and the main reasons for buying it, as have already been mentioned, are the small footprint, and the sewing thickness.   The fact that I can easily take it outside on a sunny day also wins brownie points.

Yes, I could have bought an electric powered machine, but I do not have the space, and the majority of machines available in the UK, just won't look at 3/4" leather, without a hefty price tag.

As I have said, space is at a premium, and when I bought the Boss, it was with the understanding that it wouldn't be getting a massive amount of use.   So filling my little workshop with a gallumpin' great expensive monster which might only be used once a week, could not be justified.   

In a workshop measuring 3 metres by just over 2 metres, anything that saves me floorspace is worth every penny to me.

 

That's some very salient points on the Boss. I'd be tempted to get one myself if it weren't for having a Pearson #6 next to my bench. It'll do 3/4" all day and 9/10" if I ask it very nicely. I'm very fortunate to have the space for some beautiful old iron. Need to get rid of the flatbed 45K soon though, it takes too much houseroom. (It'll do 1/2" if anyone is interested.)

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I brought a Tippmann Boss from a site called Pre loved about 5 years ago always wanted one but at the time hard to get in UK .

Tandy used to have them then stopped selling them now sell ing again have to say would not pay that sort of money for one .

Got mine for less than half that they sell them for do not use it much just like to hand stitch most of my work is horse riding tack

but recovering rubber rein grips can be time consuming  so helpful for that.

Yes they can be a little funny at times but a good machine to learn on also have a singer 46K in storage space also tight in my workshop 

when first got that machine scared the hell out of me but since using Boss and learning on it not so daunting now.

In other words yes expensive but good at what can do and easy to use once you work it out yes can be pain at times but learn as you go.

hope this helps  

JCUK 

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Yes its a year old post but just read it been doing biker type lether work for 50 years at rallys and biker events I vend out of a 44 ft trailer that is wall to wall with parts and leather goods and I do have a electric sewing monster inside for sewing patches on and light leather repairs (if electric is available) but by far my tippman boss it the best buy I've made and a crowd pleaser because I set it up outside on its cobbler bench and bikers gather around to watch me make saddle bags and tool bags

My tippman boss have generated more money then any electric machine ever could because as soon as i make a item someone watching me will buy it and of course the small foot print and manual operation is ideal for my use

Now that I've retired from the business world I still use it in my home its ideal for a old slower man to use almost all my leather is in the 8-10 oz some 12-13 oz with elk hide to use as a linner in gun holsters very seldom do I sew light weight leather

Edited by phantomusa
add on

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