Dwight

Members
  • Content Count

    3,425
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Dwight

  • Rank
    Leatherworker.net Regular
  • Birthday 11/17/1944

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.dwightsgunleather.com
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Central Ohio
  • Interests
    Church Pastor, Shooter, Leatherworking, Hunting, making most anything for the first time (yeah, I get bored easy)

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    gun leather
  • Interested in learning about
    working with leather
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    from 1911.com

Recent Profile Visitors

23,598 profile views
  1. Exceptionally good, . . . you did yourself proud there. May God bless, Dwight
  2. Thanks, . . . I just couldn't find it, . . . but then again, . . . I'm not the brightest computer light bulb out here. . . . May God bless, Dight
  3. Well, . . . I spent 20 minutes looking at every menu or link I could find, . . . still have not found them. May God bless, Dwight
  4. Dwight

    Staggered Lamellar Cuirass

    Nahh, . . . the "they" are the fingers. Their idea is that fingers are for hamburgers, . . . machines are for sewing and lacing. At 74 I've got just enough arthritis in them that I tend to agree with the fingers. May God bless, Dwight
  5. Try this thread:
  6. Dwight

    Black leather dye

    For the last few years, . . . I have used Tandy leather pretty much for everything, . . . they are physically close, and I can see and feel what I am getting. AND, . . . I use feibings oil dye exclusively as well. All my projects get "created" first and dyed later, . . . but first they all get a light coating of neatsfoot oil and at least 24 hours hanging in the shop so the oil can distribute itself evenly thru the product. Oil is only put on with a cheap bristle hair brush, . . . one coat, . . . it is put on evenly all over, . . . not streaks. THEN, . . . the dye is poured into a pan, . . . having been 1 to 1 reduced with feibings dye reducer, . . . and the product is dipped into the pan, . . . dip dying is what I call it, . . . then it is held flat in my hand until I can see most of the pools on the surface of the product have all disappeared. If it takes over 15 seconds or so, . . . I take a paper towel and wipe off the excess. Belts are laid on their edge (bottom edge) on a piece of cardboard to dry, . . . holsters, cell phone cases, knife sheaths are hung up to dry, . . . at least 24 hours and 48 if I'm not on a deadline with the product. Take a terrycloth towel then, . . . and briskly rub whatever the product is, . . . looking for loose pigment to come off, . . . and it seems for some unknown reason that black will come off, and off, and off for several minutes. I keep at it until no more dye pigment comes off. (you should see some of the towels I have, . . . ugly !!) The final process is the resolene, . . . cut 1 to 1 with clean water, . . . brushed on with a cheap 1 inch bristle brush bought from Harbor Freight. I have not had any dye rub off in years using this process. May God bless, Dwight
  7. With a very rare exception, . . . I only make double leather belts, . . . two 7 oz or so that are contact cemented together, . . . flesh to flesh. My desired thickness runs from .160 . . . to very near .250, . . . depending on the person / load / and overall length. The longer the belt, . . . the thicker I tend to make it. All of them are just a tad shy of 1 1/2 inches wide. I use Tandy vegetable tan sides and/or double shoulders, . . . as that is the leather I use also for most of my holsters and cell phone cases and knife sheaths. I can tool it, . . . leave it as plain as Tarzan's Jane, . . . or something in the middle. When one goes out, . . . it assures me that there is another CCW customer in the world, . . . making it a bit safer for the good guys, . . . and also that he / she will be able to carry a full load of CCW weapon and accouterments with no trouble. But, . . . that is the market I strive to reach. May God bless, Dwight
  8. Dwight

    Staggered Lamellar Cuirass

    Beautiful job, . . . But my fingers ache big time thinking about all that lacing. They long ago rejected any "big time" lacing or hand sewing projects. What will you be doing when you wear that? May God bless, Dwight
  9. Hey, Greg, . . . Well, . . . the pony express is still alive and well . . . . . . even if it did take longer than I had thought it would. The only pictures I have are the ones up above in this thread, . . . and I honestly don't recall if the picture was the first one or the last one ( I've only done two of them ) . . . but for sure they are a hoot. I really wanted to shoot that last one, . . . the fellow had bought it for his dad to carry in the field, . . . on the tractor, . . . for coyotes. But it was in a box, . . . new, . . . unfired, . . . and he stressed to me even he wanted to shoot the thing but would reserve the first shots to his dad. I always thought he was one fortunate father, myself. Anyway, . . . have fun with it . . . May God bless Dwight
  10. Dwight

    Help needed! Phone pouch

    I think you probably used 9 oz for the project, . . . and a toe plug that thick for that type of project would be overkill. I would probably use 4 to 5 oz, . . . or about 1.5 mm to 2 mm. That will make it not so rigid, . . . Just the way I would do it. May God bless, Dwight
  11. Dwight

    Help needed! Phone pouch

    Considering that you seem to have stained, burnished edges, and finished what you have, . . . I'd probably hole punch the ends, . . . and so a "X" lacing, . . . like shoe strings, . . . but loose, . . . it would hold the sides together and make a "pouch" out of it for your phone. First thought anyway, . . . Or if you are truly ambitious, . . . you could sew a toe plug into each end (search toe plug on here, . . . you'll see what it is). May God bless, Dwight
  12. Gymnast, . . . I'm not sure exactly what you are trying to do there, . . . but that conglomeration is certainly not safe for any kind of gymnastic activity more than perhaps attaching a rolled up exercise mat to it. You need to seek some professional advice from people and companies who make the product you are trying to invent. The D ring alone being sawn in the back, . . . will come apart under a not very severe load. Do not trust that rig to any human being, . . . trusting it for life or limb protection. May God bless, Dwight
  13. Chief is right, . . . as most are the same. My little M&P Shield is one of the exceptions, . . . it is not as thick as a 92FS or as my wife's Ruger, . . . just be aware that there are differences. May God bless, Dwight
  14. You are way over thinking this situation. Call him up and determine the mag capacity, . . . the standard 15 rd mag is 4 7/8 inches long, . . . 1 1/4 wide, . . . and 3/4 thick. Also find out if he wants friction fit, . . . or a loop over them with a snap to hold em in. The second one is my preference, . . . as friction fit can get loose and you can drop or loose a mag without a snapped cover over it. Then, . . . take a 1 x 2 that you buy from Lowes, . . . it is 3/4 x 1 1/2, . . . sand it down to the 1 1/4, . . . cut it off to 5 inches, . . . round one end and all 4 edges, . . . use it for your mold. I never make a mag pouch using a regular mag simply because if you do you wind up with a pointed mag that only accepts the mag when the bullets are pointed one way. Using my technique, the user can put them in either way. A person who carries a lot, . . . practices a lot, . . . and is proficient will carry theirs only one way, . . . for example, me, . . . mag is on my left side, . . . bullets pointing back, . . . I pull the mag, . . . re-orient it nose up, . . . and my bullets point forward, . . . ready to insert. I also don't use the actual mag because I don't want water in or near the customer's mags. May God bless, Dwight
  15. Dwight

    Holster / Pattern Videos

    I have always been hoping John Bianchi would put his cowboy holster video on line. I doubt if anyone has taken the time and effort that he did in that old VHS format. I learned more from his 3 1/2 hour or so video than any other place I've ever gone. And while the video was on how to make a western gunbelt and holster for a .45 LC, . . . so much of what he showed was also adaptable to other guns. Truly a great video series. One of my "thank you" heroes. May God bless, Dwight