Cheval

Pfaff 145 questions

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Hi,

Brand new here, but happy to have found this site, I have already found some really useful information.

I have a few questions that I need some help and advice on-

1- I have a Pfaff 145 H4 with a "Family" 550w servo motor on it. When starting to sew from a standstill, it hesitates until I push the pedal more and then I get a surge of speed, after that I can slow it down to a slow speed. It may be that skilled sewers are used to the speed, I need a bit of practice ;p. From reading the advice around the forum I was planning on finding a 45mm or so pulley to replace the existing one, and if that doesn't work maybe going to a speed reducer or possibly a different motor...? Sailrite? Does this sound like the best route?

2- Binders- I have found this one https://www.ebay.com/itm/PFAFF-145-BINDER-SET-SINGLE-FOLD-RIGHT-ANGLE-COMPLETE-/292096884215 . Are there other ones out there that will do the job better and will fit the 145? I think Atlanta attachments I have seen someone reference. Is a synchronous binder needed mainly for inside tight curves?

3- This one is more of an application question- The pics below show a saddle pad with a center spline made of webbing sewn on both sides of the pad, I realize it isn't leather but it's the concept I want to use. What is the best method to use to keep the top and bottom center spline webbing aligned, especially if it is somewhat thin. Would using magnetic guides and possibly a guide on the foot be the best approach? Pic below-

 

Pic 1

Pic 2

Thanks!

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for #3:  I think the top and bottom tape are sewn with a double needle machine with 2 tape rolls / strands running trough a special application device / devices  which guides the bottom tape and top tape. Top tape is running through a presser foot with a flat tubing or you have a attachment which guides the top tape to the presser foot - or both combined. Top tape roll could be mounted on top of the machine. I know there is a tape rack that mounts on the ridge of the machine where the oil port plug is screwed in. And a 2nd device is guiding the bottom tape (tape rack probably mounted underneath the table) and the machine sews them at once - if you know what I mean. You already mentioned Atlanta attachments - I think they can help you with this. A long arm double needle machine probably is what you want for this job. Not sure if a 145 can do this job "professionally"

I know College sewing in the UK has some has a lot of sewing devices / folders on their website. Maybe you can put together what you need with their stock item - (I know you are in the US but maybe their stuff gives you some idea - I love browsing their catalog)

LW Member ERIC hopefully jumps in here, he for sure knows more on this topic

#2 don`t know if there are binder that do the job better that the other, important is that binder and biding material / tape play well together, if the tape is too thick for the binder it will not work properly. I yet haven't used a "fixed" binder (as the one you have linked) but I have used a Pfaff 345 with synchronized binder and currently using a Singer 108w20 for binding it also has a synchronized binder. The synchronized binders work very well and I´m using approx 0.8-1mm thick cotton tape most of the time. Synchronized binder are more versatile I´d say.

#1: I have speed reducers on al my active machines - they really make sewing easier when you are not a professional seamstress.  I only can recommend the combination of servo motor and speed reducer.

Edited by Constabulary

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I agree with Constabulary re-#1. A reducer means the needle will move slower for the same effort on the pedal. I have a reducer and/or a larger pulley replacing the handwheel on all my machines.

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Yes,a reducer or a larger handwheel will help,you might check to see that the belt isn't too tight,you need a good 1"of play.Also is the machine well oiled so that it spins easily by hand?

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Thanks everyone for the info, super helpful!

@Constabulary When you say that a long arm is better suited to do the job professionally, I assume that is because of space constraints on the little 145...?

Btw I took a look at your 108w20 forum post, wow what an amazing machine- very cool.

I am contacting Atlanta and Tennessee for binders, if I can make something work for now with this machine that would be great until I can spend the money on a dedicated binder machine. It's interesting that most synchronous binder machines I come across seem to be cylinder bed versus flat.

Are the handwheels fairly standard between brands as far as fit, I have yet to start looking- am I just looking for a pulley in a larger size?

@CowboyBob I did loosen the belt a bit and that did help somewhat. I think I will start with changing the pulley/handwheel size and then go to a reducer if need be.

C

 

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3 hours ago, Cheval said:

Are the handwheels fairly standard between brands as far as fit, I have yet to start looking- am I just looking for a pulley in a larger size?

It depends on the shaft diameter, 1/2" is pretty common but you will have to measure it to make sure. Yes, a larger pulley is all you'll need (and a longer belt). There was a recent post from a member who bought a pulley for a Grizzly lathe that fitted his machine. A word of warning, if you tend to handwheel a lot then be very careful as a pulley will put your fingers right next to the belt!

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14 hours ago, Cheval said:

When you say that a long arm is better suited to do the job professionally, I assume that is because of space constraints on the little 145...?

Thats what I wanted to say but that was regarding the 2 needle machine for sewing the double tape top + bottom. I think a long arm machine makes it easier not maneuver large pieces like a saddle pad. Not saying standard machines do not work but the long arm for sure is more comfortable on the long view but for sure depends on the output you have. For outside edge binding a 145 most likely will work fine but you may need a table extension to the left. I think you will end up with at least 2 machines.

I´m not a sewing machine professional. This is just what I think what works. I´d check with a dealer (not sure where on the West Coast you are)

 

14 hours ago, Cheval said:

Btw I took a look at your 108w20 forum post, wow what an amazing machine- very cool.

Thank you :)

Edited by Constabulary

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Just found this making off video for a saddle pad - from min 6:10 on you see the sewing processes and the device / guide I meant. Hope this gives you an idea what kind of machines and sewing devices they are using ;)

BTW seems they are using a synchronized binder too - take a close look from min 7:10 on

 

Edited by Constabulary

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well, I´m on the other side of the pond but I remember Mark Rofini is in OR - he is restoring vintage machines too and I often find his website when looking for vintage Singer machines info:

http://www.industrialsewmachine.com/

 

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I actually did come across Mark’s website before, am checking in again with him.

Any idea on how the 145’s differed between the leather and non leather numbering/lettering and heavy vs light duty? I have a CLMN P,  would the non leather version just have a less heavy foot/needle setup and the bones of the machine are the same?

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To my best knowledge:

  • C: Needle plate hole 2.2mm
  • L: for leather Leather
  • M: don´t know
  • N: max stitch length 6 mm.
  • P: Special Equipment / Application (maybe pneumatic support or the like)

I wrote it down once but don´t recall the source. I´m sure someone has a more complete subclass list.

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