Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I want to make a nightlatch for riding.  Have seen several different designs, but really it is just something to hold on to if my horse goes bronc on me. 

I do not do any heavy leatherwork.  All this is, is essentially a belt of the appropriate length to go around the pommel of the saddle & have something to grab if I need it.  I have seen some simple ones like that, but they have a roller buckle & I'm trying to minimize the tools etc needed.  I have a hole punch & that's about it.  

Can I use a conway buckle?  Would that stay closed if it is getting abruptly yanked on w/ a fair bit of force?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a horse person and had to look up what a night latch was. I'd say stay away from the Conway buckle. If you are just looking at a belt then maybe cut down an old belt to suit your needs ? The night latches I saw online looked like just a belt with a D ring of leather on it? That wouldn't take a lot of tools to make and wouldn't even need leather tools. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can use an old belt cut down, a heavy dog collar works, or you could unravel a piece of head rope and do a 3 strand braid. If you want to make a leather one, I'd use a strip of 13/15 skirting about an inch wide and use a good stout buckle, stainless would be my choice, and rivet it on with copper rivets. Give it a good oiling and your good to go. Don't forget to check it once in a while just like your cinch hobble and latigo, a failure could be a bad wreck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So buckle with rivets would be safer than conway?  & what do I need to put on rivets?

I have a nice solid length of 13oz 1" harness leather that I was planning to cut to length to use.

also - what size rivets, or how do I figure that out?

Edited by appendix

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont know where you live but check out tandy leather for copper rivets. You tube has many videos on setting them. Get the longer rivets that way you can be sure that you have enough rivet stem to go through the layers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

get a 3/16" punch, Conway buckles, and Chicago screws that are 1/4" long.  only nuy solid brass or stainless steel Chicago screws, not plated steel.  Conway buckles are good because you can adjust rhe length without disconnecting, and because the strap goes through it twice, which makes it stronger.

 

Use the hole punch to punch the holes for the Chicago screws and also the Conway buckle.  Use some super glue or Loctite in the Chicago screws so they don't come loose.  A Conway buckle need not be attached to the strap, as it is held in place by the straps themselves.  Use at least three Chicago screws anywhere you use them, because one is stro g nut will swivel, two will stabilize it, and the third is the backup for the other two.

 

Don't use cheap leather or an old belt.  Get some thick (1/8" at least) firm, stiff leather, like a piece of 9-10 oz bridle belt strap and cut it to what you need (using a razor knife).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so a conway buckle doesn't have the potential to come apart under pressure?

where would I be using the screws if I use a conway buckle?

Edited by appendix
added

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Chicago screws can be used to 'lock' the Conway buckle in place, even though they don't have the tendency to come loose, especially with tension.  Just line up two of the holes that could aren't being used in the Conway buckle, insert a Chicago screw, and voila.  In that case I would not use anything to glue them.

 

Aren't Conway buckles used to make stirrups adjustable in length?  In an application like that I would expect that holding tight under tension would be a critical element.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, johnv474 said:

Aren't Conway buckles used to make stirrups adjustable in length?  In an application like that I would expect that holding tight under tension would be a critical element.

Rarely do you see Conway buckles used as stirrup adjustment.  Back when the switch was being made away from laced stirrup leathers, I believe there were some special Conway type buckles marketed to replace laces, and change the stirrup leathers into a quick change style. They have two horizontal posts. I see a few old saddles with this method of adjustment, and I hate them.  I would never use an ordinary Conway as a stirrup buckle.  A Conway is primarily designed as a harness buckle, for use where a strap turns back on itself, as opposed to a situation to join two straps pulling in opposite directions.  While it may be fine in some, or even many applications where two straps pull opposite directions, that is not it's intended use, and I would never trust a standard one post Conway on a stirrup leather.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...