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#1 Bob

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Posted 29 February 2008 - 09:51 PM

I'm considering having a bench made, but I'd like to get ideas from all of you. What you use. What works for you. What you'd like if you could have it. Post pictures, draw pictures. Share your ideas, perhaps we can have a plan drawn up of the ideal "Leather workers work bench". With measurements and plans so we can take it to a wood worker and have it made. What types of wood are best?

Some ideas I have include
  • built in granite slab in the surface
  • draws for storage
  • good lighting
  • tool holders, wooden racks for sharp tools and punches
  • slide outs, (like a cutting board in the kitchen)
  • place for bench mounted splitter
  • good cutting surface, friendly for knives
I currently have a workbench, I don't like it. I made it many years ago and it sucks. I've been searching the internet for ideas and found nothing yet.

Bob

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#2 Duke

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Posted 29 February 2008 - 10:30 PM

here is an idea for ya. works good for me.

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#3 barra

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Posted 29 February 2008 - 11:10 PM

I use this type of shelving as my basic bench framework. One set of shelves assembled in 2 halves are used with the narrow ends facing me. I then place a wooden top between the 2. With this type of unit you can mix and match. You can have shelves or benches and they can be set up to suit all sorts of workshops. i have then set up tool storage on the back and sides. you can then bolt ply sheets all over it to add hooks, more shelves, plastic maxi bin storage etc. With the holes every inch or so you can also attach drawer runners inside. this stuff is strong and while I find it stable as it is, you can add more support beams or bolt the whole frame to a stable wall. Space permitting I would use more and make a cutting bench in the middle of a workshop.

You can get it from the large chain hardware stores
Bunnings - Aust
Home depot/Lowes - US

I went with this option as I move regularly and I can knock the bench down and reassemble easily. I need to be able to sit at the bench and have my knees under as I sew with Clams 50 per cent of the time and If shelves or drawers are on the front face I am too far from being within arms reach of most of my tools.


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Edited by barra, 01 March 2008 - 12:32 AM.

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#4 TracyMoss

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 12:40 AM

Bob, I keep it simple. Just a plain bench made from 3/4" sanded plywood. Although it is the nice red oak plywood. Some 2x6's and some 4x4's. I will take a picture and send it. But my tooling bench is seperate. I set my stone in sand and covered the sand with fiberglass rosin. works pretty good for me and cuts the noise down, also very little to no vibration.

#5 leatheroo

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 12:46 AM

I use this type of shelving as my basic bench framework. One set of shelves assembled in 2 halves are used with the narrow ends facing me. I then place a wooden top between the 2. With this type of unit you can mix and match. You can have shelves or benches and they can be set up to suit all sorts of workshops. i have then set up tool storage on the back and sides. you can then bolt ply sheets all over it to add hooks, more shelves, plastic maxi bin storage etc. With the holes every inch or so you can also attach drawer runners inside. this stuff is strong and while I find it stable as it is, you can add more support beams or bolt the whole frame to a stable wall. Space permitting I would use more and make a cutting bench in the middle of a workshop.

You can get it from the large chain hardware stores
Bunnings - Aust
Home depot/Lowes - US

I went with this option as I move regularly and I can knock the bench down and reassemble easily. I need to be able to sit at the bench and have my knees under as I sew with Clams 50 per cent of the time and If shelves or drawers are on the front face I am too far from being within arms reach of most of my tools.


Barra


is that some home brew happening barra??

#6 barra

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 01:06 AM

Not my actual bench Roo, just an example of what I use as the basic framework. My bench is up and/or down in 5 min and I'm away.

I do home brew though. Not that hard core that I Keg or use a mash tun. Just plain Coopers kits.

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#7 TwinOaks

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 01:29 AM

I think Peter Main has the monopoly on ultimate workbench. Then built a shop around it. LOL
Still, VERRRY nice bench.
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#8 ferret

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 02:50 AM

I do home brew though. Not that hard core that I Keg or use a mash tun. Just plain Coopers kits.

Barra


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#9 Bob

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 10:59 AM

It would be good to hear from some of the saddle makers that work at their bench all day, have tools all over the place and want it somewhat orginized. Things have to be somewhat orginized, or you spend more time looking for stuff. Only to find it banged around under a bunch of other tools. I like to keep sharp tools.

Bob Goudreault
www.kamloopssaddlery.com


#10 jammon

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 11:49 AM

I see Barra and I share another hobby, homebrewing : )

Edited by jammon, 01 March 2008 - 11:51 AM.


#11 bruce johnson

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 12:14 PM

My cutting table is an old "free to haul off" desk from along the road. I covered the top with particle board, and have a smaller piece of poly to cut on too. It is raised with pieces of PVC pipe that slip over the ends of the legs. My wife got this idea from "Martha". It does make it a nice height. The drawers hold stuff, and the open space underneath seats two plastic scrap tubs. The knives and blade tools all hang next to it, and away from the general tool population.

My workbenches are a Gorilla rack setup like Barra described, as are the other benches and storage shelving. The work bench has a metal tray above it. I stick cow magnets to it, and then put small things like cordless screwdriver bits, awl wrenches, the most used punches, etc to them.

My stamping bench is a used office furniture store find. It has enough room to get my legs under, and it a simple cube type construction. Plenty durable and surprisingly little bounce. It is a nice height with my rock on top of it, although I wish I had a bit more room on top. Tools are in cups on the wall behind it, along with mauls, an easy reach.

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#12 barra

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 03:58 PM

http://www.taunton.c...rkshopHome.aspx

I was once in a newsagent and saw a wood working magazine that had the most amazing workshop. I think you would glean many an idea from similar magazines.

I'd have natural lighting that could be changed via windows or skylights opening or closing depending on outside conditions. I like a place for everything and everything in it's place (to a point, it is a workshop). For years I went with the traditional backboard and tools mounted with leather straps. Now I have a shelf at the back, still within arms reach and I have drilled various holes with auger bits. The smaller tools are at the front and the longer ones at the back. Similar tools are still in groups together. I also have my hand sewing threads in jars with plastic lids. Each lid has an SP1 eylet to feed the thread out of. I like peg board and plastic maxi bins for storage. On the front of my bench I have an adhesive 1 metre /36" ruler I obtained from my sewing machine mechanic. This is the type they stick on sewing machine tables. My bench top has a false top and slide out draws are installed like the pull out cutting boards you see in kitchens. If it were me and space was not a major concern I would have my bench mounted tools on a seperate bench to my main cutting or sewing bench. I like being able to have a completely flat surface with no bumps in the way. As a compromise I have mounted my splitter and rounder via clamps and can still have them firmly on the bench but removed in seconds. IMHO the best thing in the workshop is adhesive velcro. All my round and head knife pouches are stuck where I can get to them easily with a strip of pile on the wall or bench and hook on the pouch. This makes it very easy to move if I change my mind. I also have stuff stuck on my draw down stand with velcro. You can even use an old blanket stuck to a wall (this is in effect a huge peice of pile velcro) and attach items to it with the hook.

If you are in a store that installs kitchen cabinets or just other businesses in general you will get many ideas from how things are made and or set up. If you have a phone camera, take a snap.
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#13 leatheroo

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 04:39 PM

hi bruce, i wish i had a set up like yours, but my question is ...whats the blue thing hanging from the drip stand ?

#14 whinewine

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 05:16 PM

hi bruce, i wish i had a set up like yours, but my question is ...whats the blue thing hanging from the drip stand ?

roo,
sorry to pop in, but it looks like a fordham (a flexible shaft dremel tool on steroids)

#15 tonyc1

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 06:25 PM

My cutting table is an old "free to haul off" desk from along the road. I covered the top with particle board, and have a smaller piece of poly to cut on too. It is raised with pieces of PVC pipe that slip over the ends of the legs. My wife got this idea from "Martha". It does make it a nice height. The drawers hold stuff, and the open space underneath seats two plastic scrap tubs. The knives and blade tools all hang next to it, and away from the general tool population.

My workbenches are a Gorilla rack setup like Barra described, as are the other benches and storage shelving. The work bench has a metal tray above it. I stick cow magnets to it, and then put small things like cordless screwdriver bits, awl wrenches, the most used punches, etc to them.

My stamping bench is a used office furniture store find. It has enough room to get my legs under, and it a simple cube type construction. Plenty durable and surprisingly little bounce. It is a nice height with my rock on top of it, although I wish I had a bit more room on top. Tools are in cups on the wall behind it, along with mauls, an easy reach.


Bruce, I envy a workshop so neat and tidy,I really do. Mine stays like that for a day after I clean up and then it rapidly goes downhill again!
Tony.





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