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Most Profitable Braiding Projects?


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#1 megabit

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 03:21 PM

It seems to me that hondas and scarf slides have to be about the most profitable of the potential rawhide projects. I think with all the string prep and braiding I likely spend 2 to 3 hours doing a honda and maybe a hour on a scarf slide. I can sell a honda for $30 - $40 and a scarf slide for about $20. The bosals and the set of reins I made took me weeks of evening work (1 - 3 hours at a time).

Good think I don't look for this to really make me any money, I'd starve to death. ;D Another quick question what style of honda do you find sells better San Juan or Mexican Swivel? Anyone do a Mexican Swivel in 8 strand vs 4?

Mike

#2 megabit

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 08:39 AM

Forty views and no one has any opinions on what projects are profitable? This place doesn't work very well if everyone just lurks in the shadows.:whatdoyouthink::whistle:

#3 Bevan

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 09:40 AM

Forty views and no one has any opinions on what projects are profitable? This place doesn't work very well if everyone just lurks in the shadows.:whatdoyouthink::whistle:


What do you think about trade a comment ????
I am a braider just like you , i do it as a hobby but i dont do hondas or much raw hide , the only raw hide i do is for my bosal cores so it is a bit hard for me to coment on your topic mate ,

But what do you think of mine ,,, braid a trade ????or trade a braid !!!!!,,


Cheer from down under
Bevan

#4 megabit

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 10:12 AM

Your work in roo is awesome Bevan. I am always open to barter. The only problem I see is most braided stuff I need or want I'd be inclined to give it a go myself. Trying to stir up trades between the braiders and the carvers/stampers might work better than braider 2 braider. Although I've been thinking maybe I should get a whip to crack, not sure that is a project I want to try to tackle.

What type of project you figure has your best profit for your time invested? Doesn't have to be in rawhide. Speaking of rawhide you should try making a bosal with rawhide sometime, I think you would do fine.

#5 entiendo

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 11:14 AM

Bracelets are the most profitable for me. They use very little roo and they pretty easy for me to make. I'm still not making a million though..LOL.

#6 Aggiebraider

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 12:22 PM

I would have to say bracelets are pretty profitable. Im just getting tired of working on knots that are so small. I think I need to make a bosal or 2 and get away from bracelets for a while lol

#7 rgerbitz

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 12:27 PM

Braided bit hobbles, shuflies, and leather cheek bosals, and putting pinapple knots on rope mecates are the most profitable for me.

#8 roo4u

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 02:28 PM

in the past my most profitable was leashes out of roo. at shows they sell by the inch. also one of my most popular items at shows was a leather slip lead with a sliding knot to limit the slide. call them western slip leads.
TRACY

MONSTER FARM SPECIALTIES-custom tack for dog, horse and human



#9 KnotHead

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 05:08 PM

Bracelets, Necklaces & Walking Sticks, or Hiking Sticks & Dog Leashes seem to be working for me at the moment.

Brian...
Best Regards,
Brian Kidd

#10 curlyjo

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 06:31 PM

San Juan Hondas is what I've been building and selling through an internet website of someone else. Have started building Bosals with rawhide bodies and Roo buttons. Lots of learning curve there and need to sell some to pay for my Roo habit. No profit but just felt the need to get back in after quite a few years and learning from 2 old rawhiders. Also, keeps me busy on rainy days. Megabit, your honda looks good. Did you stretch it over anything or build it to size? Thanks for all the info on this page. Brad

#11 megabit

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 06:39 PM

Megabit, your honda looks good. Did you stretch it over anything or build it to size? Thanks for all the info on this page. Brad


That one I just built to size.

#12 curlyjo

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 08:36 PM

Megabit, I'm far from an expert on building these hondas but I learned long ago to braid them pretty small (two thumbs for the hole) and then drive them over a shaped piece of wood or slide in wedges and expand them to the correct size. This takes the stretch out at the very start. They can keep getting bigger and bigger if you use them in wet weather if made full size. One shaper is a spoke out of an old wagon wheel rasped down to a point. I use 3/8 bolts with the heads trimmed down for the rope hole. After you drive it onto the shaped piece of wood with the bolt in place, boil the whole honda in rolling boiling water for about ninety seconds. Take out and let dry for 2-3 days. That takes the sap out and and there is no more stretch left. I then put my burner on and put it right back on the same shaper and boil just that part in shallow water for 20 seconds. You're going to get some of the honda under the burner again but when thats dry its as hard as its ever going to get. The only way ive built a swivel type was to put the San Juan on a rope, get it straight, and then put a neck down the rope. Not really swivel but keeps the rope from breaking down under the honda. I hope this is understandable. Brad

#13 megabit

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 09:57 AM

Thanks Brad,
I think I'll give your process a try. Do you stretch your string before you cut it to size? I tend to cut mine to about 3/4 and stretch it between posts for a few days before I cut and split it to size. That takes a good amount of the stretch out.

Mike

#14 curlyjo

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 04:03 PM

Megabit, since i have to buy all my hides I cut my Honda strings just a little over 1/4 " and split then size them up from there. 3/8ths plus some would be better. My finish string is just under 1/4 and 1/8th thick. The split bullhides from Bill Confer will give you plenty of leeway. ten years ago I figured out a shape of Honda I liked and had a friend build me 3 tapered stretching forms. I can put 2 hondas on each stick with one just a little smaller then the other. As for boiling the hondas get yourself a wide deep pot and keep it seperate from the wifes. Keeps everyone happier.Brad

#15 rawhider

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 09:51 AM

Mike, my most profitable braided things are like you said: Hondas and slides. Little things that look hard, but they really don't take alot of time. I do make good money with my bosals, but I have a pretty good system down that enables me to be very efficient and since I do a lot of them, I will build a bunch at a time. Stopping and starting eats up time and that is loosing money. That's why those little projects are so profitable. You can do them in one sitting and you don't really have to bounce around too much prepping string and what not.
I shoe horses on the side and my most profitable customers are the trims. I can do up to 6 trims in an hour if the horses are standing good and well organized. I can shoe a horse (building new shoes) in an hour. At $110 for shoes and $40 for a trim, do the math.





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