Jump to content

rgerbitz

Members
  • Content Count

    436
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

About rgerbitz

  • Rank
    Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Illinois

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Rawhide braiding
  • Interested in learning about
    western tack, chaps, chinks, etc...

Recent Profile Visitors

15,059 profile views
  1. Good afternoon People, What are some options for repairing this horn, that do not include removing the swell cover? Thank you,
  2. Thank you for the input Ron. The tree is a 16”timberline Wade.
  3. Good evening Folks, Finished this up a couple of weeks ago and looking for some feedback. Not on the tooling, which was provided by the customer who has an artist in the family. If you would be so kind as to give some uncensored suggestions as to how this saddle could be laid out better. I just have the one feeling and assure you it can't be hurt. I would like to continue making saddles and will only be able to do so if the overall look and feel suits the public. I know what I will do differently next time. If it was yours to build off of what would you like to see different? In advance, your feedback is genuinely appreciated. Rob Gerbitz
  4. Much appreciated gentlemen.
  5. Hello Folks, What are some methods you all use when making a dark oil saddle to achieve the shade of color you are going for? Thank you, Rob
  6. Hello everyone, I am looking for names of people who do custom silver work for saddles. I have a lady that is looking to get a set of conchos and cantle plate made. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thank you, Rob
  7. Ed, Don Gonzales has a nice tutorial on Youtube and provides the patterns for a shave kit.
  8. Still bring green to saddle making I have a question about flat plate rigging attachment. I am working on re-fleecing a saddle that has a sewn on flat plate and am wondering what is the up-side to the time it takes to do that. Any thoughts would be welcome. Thank you.
  9. I agree to all of the above. I am still in the learning process myself. I have worn out a DVD player walking through processes with Jeremiah and Shwartz. Jeremiah does well in teaching construction and some artistry where Shwartz is always aware of the artistry of the simple lines. Get all of them as you are able.
  10. Ha! I think we may have been in the same class together Billy. And yes it was a very good class I am hoping to go again sometime. Thanks for the previous post. Real nice work.
  11. Joining a braid. Braid as much as you can. Pull the short strand back out up the braid a little then weave in the new one to be used. Hide ends in the braid. No gluing or stitching required. Many braiders use this if they break a string while braiding. Another option would be to start your braid in the middle and hide all of your joints under the nose button. Beveling does a great deal to improve the look of a braid. A board, a nail, and a razor braid can be used to make an inexpensive beveling tool. Splitting the string down would be much desired. If you search this forum you will find a bunch of options for doing so.
  12. Great input gentlemen, very much appreciated. It is a challenge to balance out customer wants vs. what looks good. In this case the customer (my wife) wanted as shallow of skirts as possible and a heavy, easy to hold on to Cheyenne roll (it's her go to "OH !@%$" handle). I believe that a thinner and narrower roll with a steeper angle out the back may have helped the back end tie together a bit better. I am in the process of building another one with similar skirts and will be changing a few of these lines to see if I can improve the overall balance. Billy, I like and prefer the flat plate construction and in this saddle feel that it worked into the design as well as possible. Just saying that the additional lines that it adds to the saddle take some additional planning to make the finished appearance look planned and balanced. For instance I had made the flat plates prior to blocking the skirts. during the fit up the point where the flat plate leather meets the rear dee was hanging about a half inch below the skirts once they were blocked. Which took a bit of correcting on the plates before I could install them. Novice mistake. Tuition paid in full for that lesson. RDL, The color came from using Herman Oak's russet skirting and olive oil. Which prompted the purchase of a Cobra 14" splitter due to Weaver only selling 13/15 in the Russet. Bonus. Please don't shoot me for using olive oil. Not my preference, but in this case it produced the color Princess desired.
  13. Hello Folks, Been a year or two since I've been around here. I am looking for some assistance with balance. I have a bunch to learn yet about construction. There are more pieces on this saddle that I did a few times and still didn't get them right, but got them close enough to live with. So here is my questions. Making a saddle that is built well and fits the horse and rider seems fairly straight forward. How do you make one line up to the eye to be appealing. I know what I like but is there has to be some rules of thumb to live by when cutting in the exterior lines that will make the front, back, top and bottom tie together well? With the pictured saddle we were trying to keep things as tight as possible without loosing the overall balance. I feel like the flat plate confounds things by adding an additional line to the overall view. I certainly prefer a flat plate, especially for this saddle which will be on a bunch of colts and likely roped out of some, just feel like there was a better way to cut the lines on it. How do you set the lines on a saddle? Thank you, Rob Gerbitz
  14. Hello Folks, Been a year or two since I've been around here. I am looking for some assistance with balance. I have a bunch to learn yet about construction. There are more pieces on this saddle that I did a few times and still didn't get them right, but got them close enough to live with. So here is my questions. Making a saddle that is built well and fits the horse and rider seems fairly straight forward. How do you make one line up to the eye to be appealing. I know what I like but is there has to be some rules of thumb to live by when cutting in the exterior lines that will make the front, back, top and bottom tie together well? With the pictured saddle we were trying to keep things as tight as possible without loosing the overall balance. I feel like the flat plate confounds things by adding an additional line to the overall view. I certainly prefer a flat plate, especially for this saddle which will be on a bunch of colts and likely roped out of some, just feel like there was a better way to cut the lines on it. How do you set the lines on a saddle? Thank you, Rob Gerbitz
×
×
  • Create New...