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mhein68

Modifying standard tools to Sheridan tools?

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A very long time ago (early 2000's) i remeber there being alot of modifying standard Tandy tools to good Sheridan tools.... Is that still a thing? I found it fun to make some cheap tools into great tools! Did google search with no luck.. Thanks

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Sheridan is a style of carving, not a type of tool. You can do Sheridan style tooling with just about any type of leather tool.

The only thing that makes sense to me re. modifying a Tandy tool would be to make the patterns deeper as some of them are so shallow that they don't make a good enough impression. This can be corrected by using an engraving tool (dremel) to deepen the pattern. 

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On 6/3/2024 at 6:43 AM, mhein68 said:

A very long time ago (early 2000's) i remeber there being alot of modifying standard Tandy tools to good Sheridan tools.... Is that still a thing? I found it fun to make some cheap tools into great tools! Did google search with no luck.. Thanks

Probably the biggest modifications are these:

- flower centers - grind a bevel around the outside edge where those radiating lines are.

- Thumbprints - narrow up pear shaders into elongated shapes with straighter sides

- Veiners - Thin them down from the back edge to make the impression thinner and more refined

- Cams can have the corners ground and made into crowners

- Bevelers - steeper angles to enable beveling stem work without mashing down adjacent lines. Typical bevelers are about 15 degrees, Sheridan bevelers are around 30 degrees and steep Sheridan bevelers can go 40-43 degrees.

- undershots/lifters - can be made from shaders with some serious grind work. 

- Flower center bevelers  can be made from vertical line shaders, shape them like a thumbprint, then grind one end to be slightly concave for a center beveler 

- Leaf liners can be made from vertical line shaders too. Grind them pretty much like you'd make a thumbprint then grind a flat angle on one end. Then make another with the opposing angle

Most of us tried it 20+ years ago, we had to. Back then the sources were pretty tight - Don King and Bill Woodruff were the major players, Barry King was just getting going, Walt Fay was making some. You pretty much had to go to Sheridan to buy them early on. The stamps were limited in number and demand was there.  Don, Walt, and Bill are gone (and those original stamps have had a 5-15 fold increase in price now). Barry King has a ton of options now, Clay Miller makes them, Horse Shoe Brand and Richard Brooks have recently stopped making stamps but made them. William Klutts is making some again. Wayne Jueschke makes really nice flower centers. Craftool Pro from Tandy has had a couple runs at Sheridan stamps.  I am forgetting some makers here, and not intentionally.  It is fun to make your own, but if you want to skip the learning curve and time spent on them, these options are there to buy them ready to go.  

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@bruce johnson  Thanks for the above

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I'm thinking the information I had (back then) was talking to Ron Ross (Indiana) and trying to get some of his knowledge?

Edited by mhein68

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23 hours ago, bruce johnson said:

 

It is fun to make your own, but if you want to skip the learning curve and time spent on them, these options are there to buy them ready to go.  

Bruce, Checked out you web page! Very Cool! I will let you know if I decide what I want to get... 

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3 hours ago, mhein68 said:

I'm thinking the information I had (back then) was talking to Ron Ross (Indiana) and trying to get some of his knowledge?

Ron has never been a member of this group. Pretty much his writing and advice was all in the old IILG email group and they rejected a forum format in favor of remaining an email list group.  (one of the reasons for the formation of this group however many years ago). I am pretty sure the IILG information and archives have all been lost when that group disbanded. Ron is still alive although I have not talked to him for a couple years.

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Yea.. I was a member of IILG also.. Darn shame it went down... I had many talks with Ron at leather shows and in group.. He always helped me with carving chats and mini lessons... 2000's I had some personal problems.. I lost many hand carved pieces and books from Ron.. ( and alot of other things!)..

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