Leila

Finishing/sealing The Back Of Hides

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Hello,

I make purses out of 5.5oz 1/8" thick cow hide. I don't line them and need to know the best product(s) to seal the inside or back of the hide. Matte finish that is mostly obsorbed and flexible. Wax? Oil? Would love any feedback or tips. Thanks!!!

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Hello Leila,

I've been playing around with some finishes for the flesh side of leather. I've made a key fob that I tried sealing with three different types of sealant to see how they wear. It has Wyosheen, Tan Kote and Resolene in three different test swatches on the back. So far it seems like the Tan Kote is holding up the best, and probably the one I like least is the Wyosheen. It and the Resolene may have needed thicker coats to do well, but rubbing in the Tan Kote seemed to smooth down the fibers and leave a finish that is holding up in my pocket.

Bob

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I usually dampened the flesh side with water and burnish it using my glass slicker or stick. When it dries, I will apply a coat of Leather Balm with Atom Wax and allow it to dry. I buff it with a piece of sheeps wool. I repeat it.

It has worked quite well especially on guitar straps.

Good luck

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I usually dampened the flesh side with water and burnish it using my glass slicker or stick. When it dries, I will apply a coat of Leather Balm with Atom Wax and allow it to dry. I buff it with a piece of sheeps wool. I repeat it.

It has worked quite well especially on guitar straps.

Good luck

I thought about Leather Balm with Atom wax because I have a checkbook that I finished that way that is holding up really well, but I worried that in an application like a belt or a strap there might be run off issues especially if it was hot. I'm assuming you don't see any issues with the finish rubbing off due to humidity, etc?

Thanks for the feedback,

Bob

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On 9/10/2014 at 12:43 PM, Bob Blea said:

Hello Leila,

I've been playing around with some finishes for the flesh side of leather. I've made a key fob that I tried sealing with three different types of sealant to see how they wear. It has Wyosheen, Tan Kote and Resolene in three different test swatches on the back. So far it seems like the Tan Kote is holding up the best, and probably the one I like least is the Wyosheen. It and the Resolene may have needed thicker coats to do well, but rubbing in the Tan Kote seemed to smooth down the fibers and leave a finish that is holding up in my pocket.

Bob

Bob

 

do you think the Tan Kote would be a good option for the flesh side of a rifle sling? I dipped 2 slings and then thought that I just messed up given the flesh side may bleed.

 

Jess

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the best way I have found is on belts holsters and such. I dye the leather first, then rub a very wettish bar of Glycerin saddle soap pressing hard to mat the fibers. polish it smooth with brown paper bag. let it dry then top it off with leather sheen spay. If I have a very bad cut  of leather with long fibers, I'll use an open flame and singe being careful not to burn the good leather

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I get great results from tokonole. There are a few places that sell it. Rocky Mountain Leather Supply keeps it on hand. I did however find that with Hermann Oak just water and the slicker did a nice job and I finished it with Aussie.

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I use Fiebing's British Tan antique finish paste and rub it in, let it set over night and then wipe off the excess with a paper towel and then buff it out. After that, a very light coat of Neatfoots oil, mink oil or even 'extra Virgin olive oil, will keep it pliable and soft.

Sam:)

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I recently tried gum tragacanth and it worked beautifully! I don’t know how it will last but I don’t foresee any problems, it’s been used to burnish edging for ages. Another thing I do to improve the flesh side is to put it on my bench sander, lightly, to remove the loose fibres. Works great! I work mostly on small things, so it’s super easy for me but I’m sure it could be done on larger pieces if you were careful. I like 120 grit that is brand new and sharp. Does a great job for me.

 

Dave

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