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Wiz,

     A couple of questions for you. Do you still have your 29k172? I found a series of photos of the one that I bought being rebuilt by and older gentleman. I don't think it was used after he finished it. At any rate I like this machine, it seems to do the best with 92 thread. When I use 138 it seems like I'm always fiddling with the tensions. I was sewing a couple of 8 0z straps together when the metal spring on the upper take up lever popped. it looks like this is a fairly new spring but I must have reset it to tight. I found one on line but they are very expensive, just wondering if you have a source for parts for this machine. Also I need to do some work on the clutch motor set up as it is difficult to feather the machine. I checked the pulleys on the 1725 motor on the machine and it appears that it is running at around 583 rpms at the machine, the manual says it should not run over 500. I would like it to run around 350 rpm at the machine. my question before I spend any more time on the clutch motor would this unit benefit from a conversion to a servo motor?

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sorry about the double post, must of double clicked. Any one that has a 29k172 feel free to jump in., I sent to Wiz as I know that he has this machine.

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I traded in the Singer 29k172 for a Singer 168 post machine in October, 2018. Mine didn't like #138 thread either. OTOH, I got an Adler 30-7 which does like #138 thread, but is normally threaded with #92.

Dealers usually have replacement take-up check springs in stock.

I buy a lot of parts from Toledo Industrial Sewing Machines. The prices are very reasonable there.

If you decide to change to a servo motor, remove the cork brake. Otherwise, get a 2" pulley for your clutch motor and put a little grease on the clutch to make it more featherable. Better yet, get a 2:1 or 3:1 speed reducer and find a way to mount it between the motor and machine.

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lol, I had thought of cleaning up the clutch then adding something to slick it up a little but wasn't sure that was a good idea, sounds like you have already been there n done that. the clutch motor runs good so before I switch I will go ahead and clean it readjust it and see how it responds. the reducer sounds like a fair idea as well. the small pulley is 1 3/4 or 2 inch now with 6 in at the machine so 3 in 1 would bring it down where I could control it better. I will get ahold of Toledo and see what they can do for me.

I went ahead and bought the phase converter for my 3 phase pfaffs, they both run pretty well I am in the process of getting the veristops repaired and running. I've been using them without but want to use all of the features so need the air connection.

thank you for the return to my questions.

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I'm not sure about the 29K172 label, but I bought my 29K72 machine in 1971 brand new in the shipping crate.  I put it on a older treadle, and wouldn't trade that for a motor.  With treadle I can sew from  one slow stitch at a time to as fast as she wants to go.  Consider that.

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I do like that idea as well. I put the service manual for the 29k72 and the 29k172 up side by side and they both show the same dimensions, set up, threading, darning, same depth to right of the needle. The only difference that I see is that the 72 has the wheel on the end and the 172 has the wheel on the side. does yours have the wheel on the end?  The 172 must be a sub class of the 72, maybe one of the collectors or service folks on this forum can tell us the difference.

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No.   The 29K 171, 172, 173 series followed the 29K71, 72, 73 series.  It was the last series made at the Kilbowie plant in Scotland.  Is yours gray or kind of a slate blue in color?  

For some reason, people have more trouble with the 171,172,173 series.    Many consider the 29K71,72,73 series the best Singers every made in a shoepatchers.  It is the one most copied by Clone makers in China.

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My 29k172 was blue and made in Japan. It was a difficult machine from time to time, throwing fits for no apparent reason, then sewing fine. I ended up replacing the entire rack and pinion assemblies, plus the shuttle driver, as well as the feed motion crank and thread holding spring inside the needle bar.

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Mine is the slate blue color. Do you have any other historical info on the 172?

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Just now, cardinal leather said:

Mine is the slate blue color. Do you have any other historical info on the 172?

Only that they were made until at least 1987. That is the copyright date on the parts manual PDF (below).

The manual below is for the 29U machines that were all made in Japan. My blue 29K172 was also made in Japan, despite not being a U series.

29U171A_172A_173A.pdf

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Wiz.  Really?   In Japan, it should have been labeled 29K172A, not 29K172.  MUMMMMM????

glenn

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54 minutes ago, shoepatcher said:

Wiz.  Really?   In Japan, it should have been labeled 29K172A, not 29K172.  MUMMMMM????

glenn

Nope. It said 29k172 and had a tag stamped Made in Japan.

29k172.jpg

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Damn.  That is a new one on me.

glenn

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Mine says made in Great Britain, it does not have the large copper bolt with the t nut on it that was on the one Wiz had.

IMG_1704.JPG

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sorry about the photo, im trying to learn how to downsize them.

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this is the other photo, hope it does not blow up again.

 

IMG_1705 a.jpg

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I couldn't figure out why the spring on the take up lever snapped. After inspecting it again I found that the last time I threaded it I missed the upper thread guide some how and managed to thread it into the take up arm direct from the tensioner. This action must have put enough pressure on the lever to pull it to the side and cause fatiguing to the spring. When the thread is going in straight there is no problem,  but there is a slight side play to the take up arm on the pin to allow it to move freely.  The moral of this story is to use all of the thread the machine correctly.

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last pictures it tooooo small - not sure but seems the spring for the thread lever is missing (+ maybe the small stud and  thumb nut?) - not sure.... See attached picture

if you have problems with imgae sizes check out  "Image Resizer 3.1.1 for Windows" - if you have a Windows system - I´m using this for years.

https://filehippo.com/de/download_image_resizer_for_windows/

 

EDIT:

sorry - have not read your 1st post  :wacko:

Not sure where you looked but these springs are rather cheap:

https://www.college-sewing.co.uk/store/82219-CHECK-LEVER-SPRING-SINGER-29K

 

IMG_4720.JPG

Edited by Constabulary

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On 1/3/2019 at 3:20 PM, cardinal leather said:

sorry about the photo, im trying to learn how to downsize them.

I use FastStone Photo Resizer to reduce, crop, sharpen and change the quality of .jpg and .png images.

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Any suggestion as to what to use in the tallow pot?  And where to purchase.  I just bought this same machine and am trying to get it all set up and functioning as well as possible.  Thanks

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2 hours ago, billcurley said:

Any suggestion as to what to use in the tallow pot?  And where to purchase.  I just bought this same machine and am trying to get it all set up and functioning as well as possible.  Thanks

Usually, nothing. In the times when these machines were  released, they only have cotton or linen thread. This required wax to set the thread and keep it from untwisting. Modern thread is either bonded nylon or polyester and it needs no wax.

Howm-so-ever, there is a use for that pot in certain circumstances. If you use leather tape to baste your seams, the needle may gum up with the adhesive as you sew through it. Adding liquid silicon lube to the wax pot will help avoid thread tangles under the needle's point, or in its eye.

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