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hanns

First sewing machine

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13 hours ago, dikman said:

When you can find a knob-control unit they are expensive!

Funny how things differ.

kgg

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There should be a good market for largen broken machine handwheels but you seldom see them advertised

Just did a quick check on Ebay.com and far more brushless servos; than the brushed ones but prices seemed to be about the same apart from some very low Enduro motors at $30 

sewing machine servo motor | eBay

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Hanns - Just wondering what you decided to do about a machine.  Did you purchase one?  I too am on the hunt and I see that your original requirements/wants are similar to mine so thought I'd ask for an update on your search and/or purchase.  Thanks!

 

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On 4/12/2021 at 4:41 PM, BelleH said:

Hanns - Just wondering what you decided to do about a machine.  Did you purchase one?  I too am on the hunt and I see that your original requirements/wants are similar to mine so thought I'd ask for an update on your search and/or purchase.  Thanks!

I ended up going with the Thor GC1541S-SRG package from Sunny Sewing Machines. It's a 1541S clone with dual tensioners (similar to the 1508) and a top-mounted foot height adjustment knob like the 1541-7. This particular kit also comes set up with a 550W brushed servo (the same one that comes standard on a lot of machines) and a speed reducer. The main reason I chose this machine over the name brand Juki is because it is specced to support larger thread sizes. Spec says TEX 270. I was skeptical, but I've now tried it myself and it works beautifully for my purposes, albeit with limited bobbin capacity for such a thick thread. Tonight I'm going to slap a 45mm pulley on the motor (comes with a 75mm by default) and see if I can get the speed down a little more.

Also, my dealings with Sunny Sewing Machines have been positive. The first machine they shipped was dropped in transit. I took pictures, rejected the shipment, and Sunny sent a replacement a few days later. They've been very responsive, and I was supported even after the sale when things went wrong.

This machine (and probably any of the 1541 type machines I'd imagine), does *amazingly well* for my purposes. It goes through two layers of 8-10 oz bridle leather like it's not even there. Bridle + layers of chrome tan? No problem. I've experimented with a bunch of needles and the Organ NW leather needles (and probably others) give the stitches a nice slant very reminiscent of saddle stitching. I'm very happy with it so far.

I've attached some photos of different tests so you can see what I mean. One is 8-10 oz bridle + 2 layers of 4 oz deer. The other shows off the slant effect.

PXL_20210410_171856936.jpg

PXL_20210411_144421856.jpg

Edited by hanns
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4 hours ago, hanns said:

I ended up going with the Thor GC1541S-SRG package from Sunny Sewing Machines. 

Thank you very much for the information - including the detailed description and the pictures.  I'm in the early stages of my search and this helps a lot since it provides me information for comparing machines and also a "review" from someone that doesn't have a vested interest in selling a machine.

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28 minutes ago, BelleH said:

Thank you very much for the information - including the detailed description and the pictures.  I'm in the early stages of my search and this helps a lot since it provides me information for comparing machines and also a "review" from someone that doesn't have a vested interest in selling a machine.

Glad to help. A little more info:

  1. This type of motor has a brake which makes operating the hand wheel a pain. The brake pad is easy to remove, but I found that the speed reducer adds quite a lot of momentum to the system and the brake is helpful to get the machine to stop quickly. To get around this, I found that there's a small "gap" between when the brake disengages and when the motor starts turning, so if I carefully push the pedal a bit, I can turn the hand wheel no problem. Just have to be very careful. I'd still like to know if the speed reducer could be avoided entirely with a small pulley + low speed brushless setup.
  2. I put the smaller 45mm pulley on the motor tonight and although I don't have a speed tester, I'm pretty sure I can get below 1 stitch per second now with light pressure on the pedal. It was a $15 upgrade ($10 for pulley and $5 for a slightly smaller drive belt). It's also easy to do, so I'd recommend it if you want to go slower.

Good luck in your search. It's not the easiest thing to shop for.

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17 minutes ago, hanns said:

Glad to help. A little more info:

  1. This type of motor has a brake which makes operating the hand wheel a pain. The brake pad is easy to remove, but I found that the speed reducer adds quite a lot of momentum to the system and the brake is helpful to get the machine to stop quickly. To get around this, I found that there's a small "gap" between when the brake disengages and when the motor starts turning, so if I carefully push the pedal a bit, I can turn the hand wheel no problem. Just have to be very careful. I'd still like to know if the speed reducer could be avoided entirely with a small pulley + low speed brushless setup.
  2. I put the smaller 45mm pulley on the motor tonight and although I don't have a speed tester, I'm pretty sure I can get below 1 stitch per second now with light pressure on the pedal. It was a $15 upgrade ($10 for pulley and $5 for a slightly smaller drive belt). It's also easy to do, so I'd recommend it if you want to go slower.

Good luck in your search. It's not the easiest thing to shop for.

I run a Family Sew servo motor on several sewing machines. Some are direct drive and some go through reducers. It is definitely easier to feather in a direct connection than a reducer setup. I can also adjust the free motion a little, but not as much as with a clutch motor. I actually sanded down one of my brake pads to get more range of motion.

Since the size of the machine pulley varies, you don't always get a great speed reduction ratio from the motor. The worst ratios are on my Singer 211g156 and a Techsew 2700. They have smallish pulleys on the balance wheel and really need a reducer to get controllable slow speeds. These machines were expected to run at higher speeds.

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