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Evo160K

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About Evo160K

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    Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Indiana

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    No speciality
  • Interested in learning about
    Claes 8345-30, Singer 45K25, Singer 45K53 and Singer 45K69 restoration
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    internet

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  1. DelNero, My Singer 45K69 treadle machine doesn't have a friction clutch on it. It's my Singer 45K25 that has the Singer friction clutch, although it has a different actuating arm on it than on your clutch. See the clutch pictures above. Also here are some pictures of both machines. Hopefully they'll be useful.
  2. Folker, Looks really good to me. Congratulations. Did I mention about using a thin metal erasing shield and a good quality red eraser to remove the extra glue? Comes off quite easily.
  3. Sombercrow, Yes, the picture does show that problem well... I've never seen that happen on any machine with a wheel. https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn%3Aaaid%3Ascds%3AUS%3A4d780bd4-5e1f-4e55-941e-f19153d604c2#pageNum=4 That's the current owners manual shown on the Tippmann website. Check the section "Threading the machine". As many times as I've looked at the manual I've been using, I never noticed the thread went counterclockwise once around back side of Secondary Tensioner Wheel (D), I've only been sliding it into the discs... that accounts for some difficulties I've had. Regarding the "E" tension wheel, It looks like you know the thread goes once clockwise fully around as that's the way it appears in your picture. Regarding needle/thread sizes, thread that's too small for a given needle will have more difficulty forming a good loop than the correct size thread. Further into the manual you'll find a needle and thread guide.
  4. "What keeps happening is that the thread keeps coming off the second tension knob , and spooling around the post that it's supported on." Are you able to post a picture of this? The machine will definitely sew thinner material when set up correctly. First thing I would do is check the owner's manual to see that the needle hook timing is spot on. I supported a mirror on a board with three screws, so I could see the needle and loop action without standing on my head. This help number for Tippmann may be useful: Need Help? 866-286-8046 Here are some miscellaneous thoughts on the Boss (no particular order) Always make firm and complete strokes up and down with the hand lever. Jerky movements or stopping then starting (particularly when about to enter or when in the material) may cause issues such as missed loops/stitches or double loops. Most importantly, if the machine locks, binds or the hand lever doesn’t want to move up or down for any reason, just stop immediately, no force. Any other action will most likely do damage. Think it through. If the material is locked in place, just cut the threads, clean out the clippings, look for the cause (thread path issue i.e.) and then continue. Double looping is usually caused by the primary tension being too loose. This machine seems sensitive to tension settings, in my opinion. See the separate sheet on adjusting the primary tension wheel and the secondary tension’s affect on it. The primary tension is named that for a reason. It’s usually adjusted twice what the secondary tension is adjusted. i.e. if the primary, knurled, round nut is turned one-half turn, the secondary is turned one-quarter turn. You’ll develop a feel for it. Feel how the top and bottom threads feel now for reference. Before threading the needle, cut the end of the thread on the same bias as the twist of the thread. That’ll leave a small, sharp point on the thread. To get extra top thread, pull it from the needle side of the “F” Guide Post, or hold the hand crank back and pull from the Needle Foot. Lubrication is critical; follow the instructions in the Owner’s Manual. Put a drop of oil in the groove (in the body casting) that the shuttle rides in anytime the groove seems dry to the touch. Makes a huge difference. Use a clear, quality, sewing machine oil like SEW-RITE Precision Machine Oil from Tacony. Check the needle tip for burrs often and check the thread path frequently, particularly before a critical sew until you’re comfortable with the machine. Keep the shuttle area meticulously clean, the tension wheel and the tension discs as well. Adjust the stitch length in increments. I believe it’s best done with the needle out of the material… not sure, didn’t experiment with it. Use your mirror stand and a mirror to see how each stitch is forming, at least until you’re comfortable using the machine. It will give you a heads-up if a problem is developing or a stitch is going bad. (i.e. hook missed the loop, hook picked up a double loop). It’s an excellent tool. If the hook misses the loop, you can often put the needle back into the missed hole and carefully continue. Haven’t had a missed stitch or double loop since the timing was fine-tuned. Machine timing first and thread tension second are critical factors in getting a good stitch. Feel how the top and bottom threads feel now for reference. Refer to your needle-thread chart(s) when changing thread size. As we learned, mismatched needle and thread combinations can cause big issues. When turning a corner, the owner’s manual recommends moving the hand lever fully to the top, lifting the foot and then turning the material. With the timing as good as it is right now, it wouldn’t surprise me if the material can be turned with the needle in the material… once you see the hook has caught the loop. I didn’t try it. When you replace or change a pressure foot, put the screw in to first resistance, then set a firm piece of leather under the foot, loosen the screw, and then tighten the screw. This insures the foot is flat and feeds as best it can.
  5. Kcstott, thanks very much for the part number. Exactly what I was needing.
  6. So the clear grease Tippmann uses on the Boss is Super Lube MULTI-PURPOSE SYNTHETIC GREASE WITH SYNCOLON® (PTFE). I found a 3 oz squeeze tube, p/n 21030, in town yesterday at Grainger. I'm told by people I trust, Super Lube and Tri-Flow make quality, clear greases.
  7. Kcstott, What's the part number on that tube? Thanks very much.
  8. Thanks one and all for your comments. So I was wanting clear grease to minimize the risk of soiling the goods. If Gottaknow uses Tri-Flow, that'll certainly be fine for me. Thanks again all.
  9. A good, quality, clear sewing machine grease should work fine. Any recommendations? Thank you.
  10. Would anyone know what the clear grease is that Tippmann Industries uses on the moving parts behind the front cover? I'd like to find some this weekend. Thank you, thank you very much.
  11. Dikman, that was my first thought, but for some reason being a "trusted Site" didn't work. Does the website's certificate need to be updated?
  12. Managers, for what it's worth: As it turned out, Google Chrome and Internet Explorer both blocked me from Leatherworker.net a number of times today. The pop-up messages (from unidentified sources) mentioned the connection wasn't safe or the website's security certificate was not up to date. My internet provider showed me how to click on the message, which I was not about to do on my own, and get to the website.
  13. TomWisc, this may be useful: http://dixiesewing.com/MANUALS/SINGERPARTS2/43-1%20-%2043-6.pdf
  14. Evo,

    Can you please confirm the thread sizes printed on that package of Singer taps? I cannot with 100% confidence read them all and a few are truly foreign to me. Here is the list I made reading off your photo.

    3/32-48

    3/32-56

    1/8-40

    1/8-44

    124-50

    46-40

    9/64-36

    9/64-40

    5/32-32

    82-40

    11/64-40

    13/64-32

    3/16-28

    3/16-32

    15/64-28

    214-32

    14-20

    ¼-24

    5/16-18

    5/16-24

     

    Thanks,

    Rob

    aka Snakeoil

    1. Evo160K

      Evo160K

      Rob, unfortunately I don't have the full kit with the plastic package, just the four taps that Shoepatcher recommended to be the most useful for him... 15/64-28,  9/64-40,  3/18-28, and 11/64-40.  If memory serves, they were about $20 each delivered.  Those four taps have taken care of everything I've needed so far to refurbish a 45K25, a 45K53 and a 45K69.

      In looking at a photocopy of the tap catalog page with sizes that Keystone sent to me to order from, I can say it does show all of the sizes you've list above, with the exception of those I've identified with a double question marks (??).  The bottom of that catalog page showed "other taps available", but it didn't print clear enough to read.  You might want to have them email the list of Singer taps they have available.

       

      3/32-48

      3/32-56

      1/8-40

      1/8-44

      124-50 ??

      46-40  ??

      9/64-36

      9/64-40

      5/32-32

      82-40 ??

      11/64-40

      13/64-32  ??

      3/16-28

      3/16-32

      15/64-28

      214-32  ??

      14-20  ??

      ¼-24

      5/16-18

      5/16-24

       

      Beautiful, beautiful work you did.

      Al

    2. Snakeoil

      Snakeoil

      Thanks Al, for the response and the kind words. Those crazy numbered threads are something I've never seen before. I suspect that 14-20 is 1/4-20 which as you probably know is a standard UNF threadform. But the others which are just a number and a pitch are a total mystery to me. I may give that outfit a call and see what they are willing to do.

      Thanks and regards,

      Rob

  15. If you're needing those special Singer taps, you can try Keystone Sewing Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa, (215) 922-6900. I bought the four tap sizes that LW member Shoepatcher suggested, they've taken care of my needs. They didn't have dies at that time. Snakeoil, I sure like your work!
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