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JoelR

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About JoelR

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    http://www.jrcustomleather.com
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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Central Pennsylvania

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  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Holsters
  • Interested in learning about
    Custom molded holsters, Tooling, Belts, Biker gear
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  1. I recently inquired about having some band saw knives welded for me by a local company here in Central PA - The York Saw and Knife Company. I have a 14" saw with a 6" riser block which puts my blade requirements at 105". York Saw and Knife can make 1/4" x 105" x .020 double beveled blades for a cost of $23.75 each, but they have a minimum order of 6 blades. I've been looking into using band saw knives for those really thick welts where nothing else cuts really well, but 6 blades is a little more than I care to buy. For those who do not know what a band saw knife is, it is a band saw blade with a sharpened smooth or serrated edge instead of the standard toothed edge of a wood cutting or metal cutting blade. It is useful in the meat processing industry as well as for textile and foam cutting. I figured I would check to see if anyone was interested in making this a group buy? I can pick them up locally and send them out at cost + shipping. Be forewarned. From what I read, working with a band saw knife is not for the faint of heart or those with short attention spans... Cut-resistant gloves or full stainless mesh gloves may be something to consider.
  2. If you read the PA law literally, i can own a rocket launcher and C4...
  3. Pkay, always like hearing from those across the pond to make me glad of our (current) rights in the US. I've taken possession of numerous handguns since this thread was started, including those of local LEOs, so my concerns have waned a bit, but it still sticks in the back of my mind. After all, we have no idea how the firearms we are holding were acquired. Granted, most looking for custom work are honest individuals. Pkay, always like hearing from those across the pond to make me glad of our (current) rights in the US. I've taken possession of numerous handguns since this thread was started, including those of local LEOs, so my concerns have waned a bit, but it still sticks in the back of my mind. After all, we have no idea how the firearms we are holding were acquired. Granted, most looking for custom work are honest individuals. Sorry, double post from the phone...
  4. Looks much better than the Argentinian stuff you can only get now. I've tried turning a few with the green wood and the wood is too oily to burnish very well. The oil cakes up and hardens and has to be sanded back down to keep any sort of smooth channel. They look good slipangle.
  5. Thanks for the recomendation and advise. Yes, before I do the job I will first make sure the leather is pliable enough to work with, and secondly that the customer knows that doing the work may make the holster usable again, but could be detremental to any value (not that the holster adds or subtracts much from these types of collectables).
  6. Many dummy guns are under-sized. Nothing like sitting in the chief-of-police's office with his new holster that he waited 4 months for to find the retention strap had to be stretched and, although the bluegun snapped in-and-out perfectly, we had to do a tug-of-war to get his Glock back out once seated. Yeah, good times...
  7. I have an aluminum version in 4" you are welcome to borrow. Made by Lindell. Has a drilled hole about 1/2" down the barrel that would facilitate adding an extension. Could probably turn one on the lathe... PM me if interested. Bobby Cleveland used to carry them, but the link is dead and I do not see them on his web site any more.
  8. It's even more complicated than more complicated. They have many molds but will not cast single runs...
  9. My first was also a flat-backed holster. I vacuum formed it using a piece of hardboard for the backing. Makes finding the stitch profile easy. Just be sure to pull the stitches in about 1/8" more than you think so the holster has good retention.
  10. A warning about non-stitched belts. I tried it as you have described using Herman Oak and horsehide. The bond lasted about 6 months daily wear before it started separating. Became almost unusable after about 8 months. The more flexible alligator will probably give you some additional life, but it will separate over time.
  11. Got a call today to do some repair work on an old broom handle mauser holster. Knowing the value of some of these old guns, I feel the need to keep everything as authentic as possible. Based on the time frame of production and the description of the damage, I assume the thread is cotton. Anyone have a recommendation as to where to get the best-of-the-best?
  12. CB3500 is skipping...

    1. CowboyBob

      CowboyBob

      Try to tighten your foot pressure alittle.

    2. JoelR

      JoelR

      Foot pressure is fine. Timing may have been off a bit. I re-timed it and it seems to be OK but it was skipping two or three times on a belt so its very sporatic. Thank you for the advice though.

  13. I have not seen a whole lot of discussion so I thought I would mention some things about the new(er) line of "Professional" products from Tandy. To date, I have tried the following: Professional Conditioner Creme: Comes in a 17oz container with a foam applicator in the lid. Price is $18 wholesale and $30 retail. Tandy advertises this as a conditioner and top-coat in one. I have done some water tests, and two layers does add a bit of water intrusion protection, but I do not feel it really offers any real benefit as a top coat so I have been using it as if it is a conditioner only. Leathers dyed with Feibings Professional oil dyes will experience some rub-off when applying the conditioner and the conditioner alone does nothing to seal in the dye once dry. It feels like it is penetrating and conditioning, but I really have to trust that the product is doing what it is intended to do as I cannot think of any real way to test the conditioning performance of the product. I can say that I can't see any way to over condition things (the limp-noodle effect) like you could do with neetsfoot oil or other liquid conditioners. Price feels a little high but there is a lot of product in the container. Added applicator is a nice touch. Major Issue - I was using up the last of my other conditioners for a few months and then went back to this to find mold growing inside the container. I simply scooped it out and moved on. No ingredients on the label so hard to say what is in it that could mold. Professional Finish - Clear Matte: Comes in 8.5oz and 33.8oz bottles. Price is $12 wholesale and $19 retail for the 8.5oz and $24 wholesale and $40 retail for the 33.8oz bottle. The 8.5oz bottle is a squeeze-style bottle which makes it a little hard to determine how much is left and when to reorder. Smell is pretty bad and will linger on your hands even after washed. Combined with the Professional Conditioner Creme, once dry, it does a really good job of locking in the dye. Dye will rub off initially when applying, but after a 24-hour drying period, even blacks do not rub off after 3 coats. I have found it easiest to apply with fabric-wrapped sponges (I get them in 8-packs from Harbor Freight for $1.99 a package). Best to apply a quarter-sized dollop on the sponge, work it into the sponge and apply in light coats. Heavy coats will dry without issue but will leave white residue in your stitches that is a pain to remove. Dries quickly for re-coating. I like it enough to have picked up the Gloss version last time I was at the store. Professional Edge Dressing - Neutral Comes in 8.5oz and 33.8oz bottles. Price is $15 wholesale and $25 retail for the 8.5oz and $30 wholesale and $50 retail for the 33.8oz bottle. I rarely "paint" my edges and was hoping that the offering of the Neutral would work well to better protect burnished edges. Results have been mixed and I have not felt confident enough with it to use it on a client's product. First application over a burnished edge resulted in a paint-like finish that pealed off. Could be the edge was still a bit damp, could be I did not allow enough drying time. Second test was done on an un-burnished but sanded-smooth edge. Dressing seemed to absorb a bit into the leather (which was expected and hoped for) and did not rub off easily after a 24-hour drying period. Definitely not a burnished-edge look, but may be a good alternative or addition to burnishing for those fibrous leathers I have trouble burnishing (like stingray and alligator). Not sure if I can recommend this product yet but have no real reason to not recommend it either. Well, as I said, this is a limited review. Feel free to add your experiences for these products and others in the "Professional" line of Eco-Flo products to the thread. If you would like a certain test done one one of the above products, let me know and I will be happy to oblige.
  14. My opinion, as someone who owns the 4" Dan Wesson and has started recently using it in IDPA, an Avenger style will leave you fealing unbalanced. Go for a pancake.
  15. So, now that I have a few Crocodile back straps in-the-raw, any tips on working with them? The end of the tail horns are pressed flat: Can I wet the hide and bring them back up (I have a wicked sheath for a hand sword in mind)? I made sure to pick hides that did not have cracks in the medallion horns so I could use the medallions. Thinking of a few outrageous holsters using the medallions as inlays but inlaying some glass eyes in a pair of horns. Thoughts?
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