Windchime

Consew 226-Thread Escaping Needle

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Thanks for your help in advance,

I'm new to this forum and have only been using my Consew 226 for about a year sewing mostly canvas and sailcloth.  I know that's a lot easier than leather but I think many of the same problems occur.  I'm amazed at the beautiful leather work shown in this forum. 

Recently, after I thread the needle and pick up the bobbin thread, when I start sewing the thread somehow escapes from the needle.  I know this is physically impossible as I trap both threads before sewing but...it is happening.  Of course when the thread escapes the needle the bobbin thread winds around the bobbin case.  Excuse me if I'm using the incorrect terminology; please feel free to correct me.  That's how I learn. I've changed needles, but the same problem keeps recurring.   In the past this occurred infrequently, but now it's happening every time.  It's very frustrating as I usually am able to solve most problems.

I'm looking forward to learning from some of  your wisdom and experience.

thanks,]

Bill

 

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Are you saying that even though you hold back both threads, the top thread is giving up at the needle? First, make sure you are using the correct needle system and size and that it is inserted with the thread channel on the left side and scarf on the right.

If the machine does sew at all that translates into the top thread is breaking (possibly from a burr). If you can't get any stitches at all, the timing has gone out (likely), or a safety clutch has popped. Inspect the hook to see if there is a jagged edge at or near the pointed end.

You can watch the timing as you hand wheel the machine. The needle should go down to BDC then begin to ascend. The tip of the hook should intersect the needle about 1/8 inch above the eye as it ascends. That's usually where the best loop forms on the right side of the needle. If the hook arrives after the eye of the needle has passed it, the timing is retarded. If it arrives below the hook, it is advanced.

The needle timing can be thrown out by impacts against metal or very hard material. Some machines have one screw holding the needle bar in position. A solid impact, or series of impacts can cause the bar to slip up enough to de-time the machine. A thread jam in the shuttle usually cause the timing to change. Some machines have a safety clutch that disengages the shuttle drive to protect it. If the clutch pops, you need clear out thread remnants in the shuttle and bobbin race, then hold down a button on the bed while turning the hand wheel, usually backwards, until it snaps back in the drive position.

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Wizcrafts,

Thanks for your prompt reply.  The thread is not giving up at the needle, or breaking.  It stays intact, unbroken, but somehow comes out of the needle, even though both ends of the thread are intact.  I am using the same needles that I have used for a year, I changed the needle several times, and inspected the needles for failures using a microscope, but the needles appear to be fine.  I know it sounds impossible, but it's happening.  I'm an engineer and this has me baffled.

thanks,\

Bill

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Do you have a camera you can use to record the machine sewing?

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You never mentioned what size of thread you are using on top and in the bobbin or the type and size of the needles that you are using. My first thoughts would be to unthread everything top thread and bobbin. Reinstall top thread checking thread tension / paths from the spool to eye of the needle checking needle is installed correctly (right direction of scarf and needle fully seated). I would then thread a different fresh bobbin checking for correct tension and correct direction of bobbin spin in the bobbin holder. Then I would hand wheel it through a dozen cycles with fabric under the foot and with the bobbin cover plate off to watch as how it is trying to pickup the bobbin thread and sew.

kgg

 

 

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I tried to attach a short video and a pic of where my bobbin thread exits but I'm limited to 1.46 MB and any video I have won't fit. 

It always worked so I never noticed where it exited the bobbin. It exits near the top of the bobbin housing at about the 8:00 position.   I removed the bobbin housing to clean it so maybe the hooked piece on the front is adjusted too loose.

Great idea to hand wheel it through.  Duh! I never thought of that.  Thanks for the suggestions.  I'm using 97 polyester thread on top and bottom from Sailrite.  I'll install a new bobbin and thread.

thanks again,

Bill

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3 hours ago, Windchime said:

I tried to attach a short video and a pic of where my bobbin thread exits but I'm limited to 1.46 MB and any video I have won't fit. 

Post it on YouTube

Tom

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I tried to attach a short video and a pic of where my bobbin thread exits but I'm limited to 1.46 MB and any video I have won't fit. 

It always worked so I never noticed where it exited the bobbin. It exits near the top of the bobbin housing at about the 8:00 position.   I removed the bobbin housing to clean it so maybe the hooked piece on the front is adjusted too loose.

Great idea to hand wheel it through.  Duh! I never thought of that.  Thanks for the suggestions.  I'm using 97 polyester thread on top and bottom from Sailrite.  I'll install a new bobbin and thread.

thanks again,

Bill

Sorry about the double post.  I'm new to this.

Great suggestion to post on youtube.  I also downsized my bobbin photo.

 

IMG_7114small.jpg

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I looked at your video and what I noticed was that I think you may have threaded the needle incorrectly. It is a little hard to see blue thread on blue material. The needle has to be threaded from the left side of the needle with the scarf (long scratch on the needle) facing directly away from the bobbin then through the hole in the needle towards the bobbin.

I think what's happening is that the top thread is actually breaking around the bobbin hook area or being pulled back through the eye of the needle as the hook passes and then getting wrapped around the bobbin case.

Also I would recheck the installation of the bobbin in the bobbin case to make sure it is correct. To check, remove the bobbin from the bobbin holder and with the bobbin in your right hand grab the thread with your left hand. Pull the thread to unwind some thread from the bobbin. The bobbin has to rotate counter clock wise in your right hand. If it does then drop it over the centre pin of the bobbin case and lock the centre pin down over the bobbin and rethread.

kgg

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I saw the starting top thread being held back outside the inner foot's hole. Try feeding the top thread through the hole in the inside foot before you sew. It may solve your mystery.

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The bobbin is not threaded correctly either.  Off the right edge of the photo is a small slot the the thread needs to be pulled through so it passes under the spring to provide bobbin tension.  It then should come around the front past the latch opener (the triangular shape in the lower right of the photo).  Re-check your manual or look at YouTube videos for your machine to see correct threading.

This machine is threaded the same way yours should be even though it is a different mfg and is a cylinder arm instead of flat bed. 

Tom

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I noticed you started stitchng with two threads held back, and at some point one disappeared and you were left holding one thread.  I think these guys have it right.  It does appear that the needle is being threaded right to left rather than left to right and the hook is simply pulling the thread back out of the needle but it appears that it's magically escaping the eye.  

 

The other possibility is that you have a broken needle that took a hook strike to the eye, and one side of the needle hole is actually broken but appears to be whole because the break springs shut and closes the gap when not actively sewing.

 

 

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Merry Christmas!

Thanks for all the great advice. I have no manual to refer to so you all are my only resource.

I see that I’m doing several things incorrectly:

#1 threading the needle from the wrong side

#2 threading the bobbin wrong

#3. Not passing the thread through the foot 

#4  passing the thread incorrectly through the tension device

There are probably other things that I’m doing wrong also but with your help I’ll learn  

The threading video was a great help.  I’ll try out my new knowledge after Christmas dinner  

thanks to all...

and to all a Merry Christmas ,

Bill

 

 

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We all have to start from somewhere. This site is a great resource. Enjoy your Christmas dinner, just put ours in the oven and hopefully it's going to be great as it is my first time, yes my first go ever cooking Christmas dinner. Should be a chuckle.

kgg

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I must admit I'm puzzled how you managed to sew canvas ok if this is the way you've always threaded the needle and bobbin.:blink:

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Sorry about the double post.  I'm new to this.

Great suggestion to post on youtube.  I also downsized my bobbin photo.

 

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Hallelujah!!!

After following everyone's suggestions, my  machine is sewing well again.

I've never had any bobbin tension, so I took the bobbin case out to see how the tension spring worked.  After placing the thread under the bobbin, voila!, I  had bobbin tension.

I'm still not sure how to pull the thread under the tension spring when the bobbin case is installed.  I'll probably figure it out with practice.

Thanks again,

And a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to All,

Bill

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Bill this youtube video maybe of some help. As far as adjusting bobbin tension I think there is a screw on the side of the bobbin case holder around the five o'clock position that you screw in to add bobbin tension or out for less tension, make small adjustments like 1/16 of a turn. From an engineering point of view all sewing machines are intriguing marvels of machinery that basicly haven't changed in the last hundred years. Particularly when come to think of how everything has to be in perfect sink to lock together two simple pieces of thread to form a simple tough stitch to attach pieces of material together. What would be a nice improvement to sewing machine engineering wouldn't be more efficient motors, more computer controls or stitches but the elimination of having too wind bobbins and have the bobbin thread come off a large thread spool from underneath the machine.

kgg

 

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2 hours ago, kgg said:

SNIP

From an engineering point of view all sewing machines are intriguing marvels of machinery that basicly haven't changed in the last hundred years. Particularly when come to think of how everything has to be in perfect sink to lock together two simple pieces of thread to form a simple tough stitch to attach pieces of material together. What would be a nice improvement to sewing machine engineering wouldn't be more efficient motors, more computer controls or stitches but the elimination of having too wind bobbins and have the bobbin thread come off a large thread spool from underneath the machine.

kgg

 

Many sewers have pondered the mysteries of the bobbin system, hoping to discover a way to use a spool of thread instead of a wound bobbin inside a case. The best they have come up with is the chainstitch mechanism. This system only uses one spool of thread which is on the top. Aside from the appearance on the underside, the problem with a chainstitch is that unless it is waxed, or sewn over, it can totally unravel by pulling on the thread in just the right direction. Garments sewn with a chainstich are usually sewn over at the beginning and end to keep the thread from unraveling.

An example of a waxed chainstitch would be a dogleg style leather rifle case. They are usually sewn on a Puritan chainstitch machine with linen thread run through liquid beeswax in a huge wax pot on top of the machine. The chain is protected by the material lining inside the case. The same chainstitch system is used in the McKay sole stitchers with a rotating horn. With these the chain is covered by the slip-in insole, as well as wax on the thread.

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20 hours ago, Windchime said:

 

I'm still not sure how to pull the thread under the tension spring when the bobbin case is installed.  I'll probably figure it out with practice.

 

When I install the bobbin I put the thread through the slit in the bobbin case, wind the machine over by hand to get the thread to the top, then hold the bobbin still and pull the thread.It will snick into the tension spring.Machine is a juki 563 but may well work on your machine.

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Thanks to all for your advice. 

I’m amazed that my machine actually sewed the way I was threading it. It worked but it was very temperamental. 

Today, it stitched perfectly, with no problems. 

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5 hours ago, Windchime said:

Today, it stitched perfectly, with no problems. 

Yeah!

 

 

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Good job!  I just had a big sense of relief. Lol 

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That is great news.

kgg

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