luxuryluke

Okay, I’m positive I need a 335 (video)

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Okay, I’ve been on the fence about a flatboed vs a cylinder arm with table adapter. 

But then I see this and I’ve made up my mind. 

 

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A cylinder arm is probably more versatile, but it all depends on what you're going to sew, you can do most things on a flatbed (except go round and round and round like in the video :rolleyes2:).

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As mentioned the cylinder arm is more versatile, I also agree.  

They hard truth is they can be twice the price easy, and still many people here can really describe their benefits within their own shop. In truth as you probably realized, these types are at times difficult to find used.

Im going to share or mention respectfully. I have thought about it as many im sure, the building of a small table surface for my cylinder arm. My gripe! Is it would need abilities of removal in seconds.

I have only had brain fart ideas on any mountings but, if the cylinder arm is the! Machine in your shop for over a day. I feel the top needs ready removal ability and so its a critical need. 

Dont get me wrong, I enjoy assembly style processes, so sewing batch parts are perfect in my planning. Its a thought to consider. 

 

Good day

Floyd

 

 

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I have a Mauser version (Pfaff) 335 pretty much exactly like the one in the vid and yes, it can do that round and round business all day. On vinyl, woven or light leather. I actually made my wife some crazy looking gauntlet/bracelet things using that exact technique.

If you are trying to blaze through lighter materials it is an excellent machine. If you are doing heavier leathers or veg tan it will struggle. It will also struggle on anything heavier than 69 thread. You can force it to do 92 but it doesn't like it. It's a light touch machine.

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These machines will sew #138 all day.  You must open up the feed dog hole a little bit.  I sewed #138 on mine for years in hockey gear with a #23 needle..  They were the best machine in their class for decades.  I now have an DA669 and that is the new generation.  Great machine.

glenn

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I have a new Yamata fy335 phaff clone and will run #207 all day in the needle with #138 in the bobbin. I bought it in November and it ran way to fast, after changing the crap servo motor that came with it and installing a heavy duty reducer, it chews through anything I can get under the foot. The 1/2 inch lift and small bobbin was it's only limitations which I regret. The cheap monster got me and now I'm waiting for my new girl, Cobra Class 4 to be delivered this week. I may put the Yamata up for sale if I find true love.

yamatasmall.jpg.4e8af45a0f8f88df70f7a1eeef5c879d.jpg

Edited by CaptJake

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The new style 335 (Pfaff and Mauser Spezial) are actually spec'd for 80nm to 100nm needle size (that's 12 to 16!) 

I've had good results timing mine to an 18  needle (then I can squeeze a 19 or 20 in there) but it struggles to sew anything heavier than 92 and it struggles to feed anything that would require thicker thread anyway.

Anyway, that's my experience. Maybe the old style has a little more capacity.

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Thanks for all your comments and advice everyone. I think I've arrived at my new first machine and am talking about it here: 

I'll post updates there.

 

 

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