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artigiano

Lifting clicker with forklift

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I have a FIPI brand hydraulic clicker (which weighs approximately 2000 lbs) that I am looking to lift off the ground in order to place a pallet under it for transport. I was planning to use a forklift for this job but was curious if anyone has experience in this arena. There aren't any areas on the clicker that can support the forks except under the swinging head of the machine, which I can screw down tight over the forks. I'm just worried that the head may not support the full weight of the machine. Any thoughts?

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16 minutes ago, artigiano said:

I have a FIPI brand hydraulic clicker (which weighs approximately 2000 lbs) that I am looking to lift off the ground in order to place a pallet under it for transport. I was planning to use a forklift for this job but was curious if anyone has experience in this arena. There aren't any areas on the clicker that can support the forks except under the swinging head of the machine, which I can screw down tight over the forks. I'm just worried that the head may not support the full weight of the machine. Any thoughts?

At that weight, I have to assume that your machine is at least a 20 ton clicker, probably much higher.  That means the head is rated to press 20 tons of force.  Your machine weight is approximately 1 ton.  Your head is more than rated to lift the clicker up, and lifting it with a strap is a common method of lifting these in the factory. I've done it myself on our 16 ton machines (1400 lbs).  
However, if you like, almost all clickers can be lifted by placing the forks underneath the machine, close to the feet of the machine.  The lower case is designed to hold the weight of the machine.  just make sure the forks don't bang in the machine or any drain plugs in the bottom of the case.   EXPECT THE FORKS TO BEND.  When they bend, counter by leaning them back a little to keep the machine level.  
I would strongly suggest a pallet with a solid surface.  a regular pallet will crush under the point load of the feet.  I use 3/4" plywood (NOT OSB!!) for a base, and even then, still reinforce with 2x4's.  You might just use (2) pieces of 3/4" plywood.  Be sure to bolt the feet to the pallet: If one foot crushes, the bolts will keep the machine upright.  

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Thanks for the reply and insight. I'd be a little reluctant to lift the clicker from below since I don't see much clearance on my model and the forklift operator (not me) doesn't have the experience with a top-heavy item like this. 

So you've used a sling under head of the clicker? Might be a little more challenging to attach sling to forks. Most of these for-hire forklift operators don't like to get too creative.  Would there be a benefit to using a sling as opposed  to screwing the head directly down onto the forks?  Can you think of any risk of doing this way? 

Thanks!

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The machine will tilt back.  if you use a guiding line to keep the tilt in check, it should be ok.  This would be the case with lifting with a strap as well.  

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Thanks. Yes, I figured there would be an issue of tilt since most of the weight is towards the back of the clicker.  What exactly do you mean by a guiding line to keep the tilt in check? Do you mean something simply to visually monitor the balance as it is lifted or a supplemental physical line of support of some sort? 

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A few years ago I moved an Atom Se25 in my shop and it's a heavy machine...
I think a FIPI is a clone of an Atom?

Anyway,  There should be some threaded bolt holes on each side of the clicker near the surface of the "table"  Those are for bolting a lifting sling to the machine.  It's just a piece of chain with a flat metal plate on each end with holes drilled for bolts to pass through.    I think you could rig one up yourself pretty easily.    I actually had one (Or should say I still have one). Meaning I have no idea where it's at.....Lost but present somewhere on my property :)

DONT pick it up by the head/swing arm if you can get out of it.   I've done it before on other machines but looking back I wouldn't do it again :)

Other than that, once you get a skid/pallet under your machine you can move it that way.   I happen to have a steel base with rubber feet that came with mine that I left on it. (I think it's a type of sea/shipping skid with tunnels in it for forks).

I didn't use a forklift to move that machine.  I rented a "Super Bobcat" the heaviest, biggest bobcat/skid-steer I could get.  Cost me about $100 to rent a day with pallet forks.

Just went REAL SLOW......The clicker was heavy and it did lift the back wheels of the bobcat a couple times. 

I'd suggest renting one of those Bobcats w/forks and just go real slow.   I specifically rented one as i had to drive over some grass yard and through a door only 9' high...
Forklift might struggle a bit with that.

Anyway just my experience/suggestion, yours may vary considerably.

Here is a PDF link for an ATOM manual. It shows how to sling it  up about 1/2 the way through.

https://www.kempler.com/sites/default/files/manufacturer/docs/catalog/Atom Series SE Clicking Press With Turning Arm Manual_0.pdf

 

Edited by Cumberland Highpower

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