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Spyros

Yucraft creasing machine

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So I bought this machine on Etsy from a nice guy named Wayne who is probably the most responsive seller in the world.  I mean considering the time difference he must have been answering my questions in the most ungodly hours of the night, offering great advice and solutions to all my ignorant questions.  Because this is my first creasing machine and although I knew I wanted one, if I'm completely honest I didn't really know exactly why, I just wanted it LOL

And when the crucial question came "what tips do you want with it"  my response could be  pretty much summarised in one word:  "Derrrrrrrr......"

So Wayne helped me pick five commonly used tips, and next thing he did (probably while packing with the other hand because the package was in the mail almost immediately) was email me the manual.   Which of course I didn't read because I am, you know, male.   And not very smart.

A few days later the DHL dude knocked on my door and then ran and hid behind the fence because COVID, and was very happy to take a wave instead of a signature.   At least he waited to make sure someone opened the door, so nice of him.

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Upon first inspection I can't tell where this thing is made (probably where everything is made these days), but FWIW it shipped out of Knoxville, Tennessee.  Maybe Wayne makes them in his shed, I don't know, but it looks and feels well made. 

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All metal outside (looks like aluminium?), I think the feet are silicone, the cable is nice and long and very flexible which is great, and it attaches very firmly to the machine with a screw flange.  Woodwork on the handle and holder is pretty basic but well executed, no complaints, the on/off switch an dial are solid, big and clicky and very easy to find and operate single handedly.  The whole thing is on the small side and not too heavy, which I don't mind at all because I tend to work mostly on my desk and I'm running out of space.   Nice big screen, very easy to read, full of numbers that I don't know what they mean, but the operation is fairly straightforward:  Turn it on, and then turn the dial until the tip is hot enough to do what you want it to do to your leather.  Simples. 

Supposedly it has other smart features that went right over my head, but I did notice it goes to sleep if you don't use it for a while because it has some sort of vibration or motion sensor.  And then when you pick it up again it turns on automatically.  Nice.  Wayne doesn't want me to burn my house down.

In terms of how well it performs, I don't have anything to compare it to.  I can tell you that the creaser definitely creases and the burnisher definitely burnishes, but I haven't tried the spatula or the polisher yet.

(In the photo below please appreciate the effort of creasing with one hand while taking a photo with a DSLR with the other, the things I do for my fellow leatherworkers)

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Any other questions like if the thread accepts tips from other brands or if the tips are welded or soldered or friction fitted, I don't know.  if you want I can message Wayne on Etsy at 3am Tennessee time and he will probably respond in 3 minutes LOL

All I know is I always wanted to try one of those, but no way I was paying Regad what they're asking just to satisfy my curiosity.  Yucraft/Wayne made it possible for me to have a go without too much investment and so far I'm loving it :)

USD$298 incl 5 tips of your choosing, handle, and handle holder.

Cheers

SP 

 

 

 

Edited by Spyros

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Hi Spyros, My son has a soldering iron just like that he got from Aliexpress, looks like someone has rigged it up with some tips from the same site. I have one like the tip in the handle but it looks like the guy who put it together probably put a thread or something on it and adapted it to the wooden handle, mines just slips in and tighten with a screw. Possibly the unit has been dumbed down, as for leather you would need it to be around 80º and up i think?? the soldering rigs go from 150º-450º or something like that. I agree Regad is OTT for what it is. Have fun...jimi

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Yes I guess there's no reason not to share most parts with a soldering iron,the main thing is to regulate temperature way down for leather.

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Hi guys , as a total newbie my question is what does creasing do ??

Is it literally to put a crease / fold in the leather , or some other job ??

Sorry if question is a bit dumb but I am totally new to this .

Regards

Stephen. 

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5 hours ago, stephenhill said:

Hi guys , as a total newbie my question is what does creasing do ??

Is it literally to put a crease / fold in the leather , or some other job ?? 

A 'creaser' puts a pressed in groove near the edge of your item. It doesn't cut the leather as a groover does, it just presses it into the leather. You can get creasers with different sizes, the distance from the edge, from 0.5mm to about 3.5mm. The pressed in groove is both decorative and can add a bit of stiffness to the leather along the edge. You can get hot creasers like this one, or ones that need heat with a blow-lamp, and you can get cold ones which just needs a bit of muscle to press the groove 

 

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What Fred said.  Other than creasing, you can also use it (with suitable tips) as a burnisher, wax spatula, polisher, and even thread burner.

And probably soldering iron of course :)

Edited by Spyros

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You're not just limited to the edge of the leather, either. There are heads available that will allow you to "freehand" anywhere on the surface.

To expand on what Spyros said, it's very common to heat and rework edge paint like Fenice after it's been applied. It's really nice to have a good, constant temperature when you're doing that kind of thing.

It looks like Spyros got a good deal.

 

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Yea that's what those Chinese guys make money on these days since the Regard tool became popular some years ago. Buts please don't call it a Creasing machine because that's something completely different. It's an electric creasing iron and it's a over 100 year old system. The electrical supply would need enough watt output and a PID to constantly maintain the temperature. And of course a suitable handle you don't burn yourself on.

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On 8/9/2020 at 6:54 AM, Trox said:

Yea that's what those Chinese guys make money on these days since the Regard tool became popular some years ago. Buts please don't call it a Creasing machine because that's something completely different. It's an electric creasing iron and it's a over 100 year old system. The electrical supply would need enough watt output and a PID to constantly maintain the temperature. And of course a suitable handle you don't burn yourself on.

I don't have a problem with people making money, good for them.  There's obviously a broader discussion here about environment concerns and working relations etc, but when your other option is to pay $5k in European tools (just because they are European) so you can make a $50 wallet then this is not really a viable option either.  I find there is a gap in the leather tool market for mid-range, middle-priced tools, and whenever there is a gap someone will eventually fill it.

Thanks for the clarification, creasing iron it is!

Edited by Spyros

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2 hours ago, Spyros said:

I don't have a problem with people making money, good for them.  There's obviously a broader discussion here about environment concerns and working relations etc, but when your other option is to pay $5k in European tools (just because they are European) so you can make a $50 wallet then this is not really a viable option either.  I find there is a gap in the leather tool market for mid-range, middle-priced tools, and whenever there is a gap someone will eventually fill it.

Dixons used to be pretty good at that -- good quality tools (though a little rough around the edges) made in the UK with decent steel for a reasonable price that would last for several generations. From memory, about 10 years ago (a couple years before they closed) a round knife was about £75, a pricking iron £40 and an edge shave £25. Well regarded "working" tools, whereas Blanchard was considered "good quality, pretty, and pretty expensive". George Barnsley tools have been revived and are filling the gap left by Dixons. Same old patterns that they used to in the heyday of leather hand tools (and some newer designs), made in the same city, by a firm owned by George Barnsley's grandson IIRC. CS Osborne also fits in this niche, though obvious US based rather than Europe.

Not quite sure where $5K comes from, unless you're having Blanchard decorate your tools with gem stones ;):lol:

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Oh it adds up, considering I nee

2 hours ago, Matt S said:

Not quite sure where $5K comes from, unless you're having Blanchard decorate your tools with gem stones ;):lol:

Well you need a good collection of punches,  you never know what size and shape of hole or belt tip you want to cut next.   Some pricking irons and chisels and a couple of good quality awls to prick your fingers with.  A Regad kit with a bunch of tips.  Some cutting knives and bevellers.  A solid revolving punch because it's not worth buying a cheap one.  A tabletop splitter and a draw gauge and knife.   A saddlers clam, some skiving knives in different sizes and shapes.    Some setting tools, maybe an arbor press.  A couple of mauls, a hammer, a round knife because it looks cool, a compass, a nice block of wood with holes to put it all in.  A solid surface to work on, a small anvil to pound on.  A tormek to keep it all sharp (with a Japanese stone please), and a diamond stone for those sensitive items.    And all that before you decide you want to try your hand at shoe making/tooling/saddles :D

It adds up if you're not careful.

Edited by Spyros

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15 hours ago, Spyros said:

I don't have a problem with people making money, good for them.  There's obviously a broader discussion here about environment concerns and working relations etc, but when your other option is to pay $5k in European tools (just because they are European) so you can make a $50 wallet then this is not really a viable option either.  I find there is a gap in the leather tool market for mid-range, middle-priced tools, and whenever there is a gap someone will eventually fill it.

Thanks for the clarification, creasing iron it is!

Of course the labor cost is somewhat higher here in Europe where child labor is not legal :)

It's not only labor cost, it's the components they use in them.

The secret to this tool is how accurate it keeps the temperature. How fast it's heating, there shouldn't be any down time before it's hot enough.  A thermostat would not work, a accurate PID controller is needed. Even professional class soldering stations cost money because of the components it's in them. Perhaps a cheap Chinese PID control will do the same job as a expensive one. Only way to see that is to compare them doing a test job.  I've just bought such cheap Chinese PID controller for upgrading an old hot foil machine. I hope it will do the job.

Tor

Edited by Trox

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