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MedusaOblongata

Can You Help Identify These Tools?

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I bought a lot of old, used leatherworking tools. Most I identified, cleaned up, and put to work. These few left me with some questions.

#1 has this pattern, not sure what it would do.

#2 might be a creaser(?) but it would leave a line pretty far from the edge if so.

#3 has three curved sides heading towards the point. The edges aren't sharp, but they seem sharpenable, though I wouldn't see why.

#4 has a point like a scratch awl, but the barrel is textured like a file, and the wire wrapping on the handle seems a bit like overkill since awls are simpleish. Maybe just homemade?

#5 Is has a 1/8" hole from the end of the handle all the way through, though I don't know why

#6 is flat on the back/top end, though it's textured around the sides of the top. The lower half is rough enough that side is uncomfortable to hold. I have rasp dremel bits similar in structure.

#7 is well worn, but could has a curved and sharpened end

#8 is round on both ends, knurled in the middle. It could be a pin punch for very large pins.

#9 could be a very wide edge beveler, though it's so dull it would take an hour on a grinder to get any kind of edge on it.

 

Thank you for taking the time to look over these for me.

 

 

Inked20201227_232014_LI_numbered.jpg

Inked20201227_232005_LI_numbered.jpg

Inked20201227_233006_LI_numbered.jpg

Inked20201227_232952_LI_numbered.jpg

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quick look

#1 is a counter sink maker, for woodworking, turn it to cut a countersink hole for screw head

#9 is an upholstery tack lifter, push the v under the tack head to lever the tack off

#6 looks like a tapered hole-reamer, for enlarging holes slightly

#4 looks like a parallel hole reamer, for cleaning holes already made

#8 looks like a nail setter - for the final whacking of a broad-head nail to set it flush with woodwork

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I suspect these are some woodworking tools that have been mixed in, though they might be used when wood & leather are combined, perhaps a saddle or furniture, and I go along with FREDK

#1 is a countersink bit, used to set a flat headed screw below the surface of wood. It fits into a carpenter's brace, as in brace & bit

#2 is a tack lifter, for use on furniture and carpets

#5 could be a turnscrew, used to fit grub screws and bushes that have just a couple of holes instead of a slot 

#8 is a wide diameter nail punch, used to set the head of a nail flush or just below the surface of wood

Edited by zuludog

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#2 is an edge wheel for shoe making or repair.

#3 is a metal deburring knife used in machining, etc.

#5 looks like a spanner screw driver.

#6 has me baffled as I have never seen holes drilled in the flutes like this tool????

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#2  is a glazing iron.  Used on the welt of shoes.  They come in different widths.  It doesn't leave a groove, it gets heated up and smooths the welt.  The lip rides the edge of the sole so that you don't burn the upper.  There are ones without a lip that are used on the heel.

 

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22 hours ago, Aven said:

#2  is a glazing iron.  Used on the welt of shoes.  They come in different widths.  It doesn't leave a groove, it gets heated up and smooths the welt.  The lip rides the edge of the sole so that you don't burn the upper.  There are ones without a lip that are used on the heel.

 

Aven,

I knew that it was used to go around the edge of soles, so the wheel just aides the tool by creating less friction as it goes around the edge of the sole? Why do some of these tools have different coarse straight knurl lines on the wheels? Also why does the part of the tool that smooths out the welt have a small edge landing, almost like the edge guide has an edge guide?

I have seen these tools with different wheels patterns (more like knurlings) on them and also have seen them heated and used as decorative markings on the soles of shoes inbetween the stitching and edge of the sole, which is not be the proper use of the tool. 

Thanks, 

 

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I'm not sure

#2 is for a shoe sole, I think its a book binders edger

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Ryan, it is entirely possible I am wrong.  I didn't see a wheel, but I'm viewing the forum on my phone.

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I'm guessing #9 is a tack/nail puller.

Oops, Fred said that already!

Edited by Sheilajeanne

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#6  4-3/4" COTTON GIN SPINDLE SURVEY SPIKE

usually used in asphalt  

 

See the source image

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# 8 is a drive pin punch also know as a drift punch

here is a glock with a roll pin  and punch used to remove it

See the source image

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2 hours ago, Frodo said:

#6  4-3/4" COTTON GIN SPINDLE SURVEY SPIKE

usually used in asphalt  

well, there ya go. who would have thunk you'd find one in amongst leather working tools.

In the UK the survey people use a rather plain slightly raised head brass pin/nail thingy

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# 6 for sure spindle off the Head of a cotton picker. Twists and pulls cotton out of bolls. I use them as a stamp and punches. 

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On 12/29/2020 at 11:47 AM, fredk said:

I'm not sure

#2 is for a shoe sole, I think its a book binders edger

 

I have a tool like the #2 tool where the wheel height is adjustable. Whether it is used on soles or books, I think the wheel itself is used to mark the leather. I have seen this wheeled tool used, by 2 shoe makers on youtube, to mark the sole of high end shoes like Allen Edmond's. With having an adjustable wheel height/depth of just over 125", I wonder if it is used for something else other than marking the leather? ??

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7 hours ago, Frodo said:

#6  4-3/4" COTTON GIN SPINDLE SURVEY SPIKE

usually used in asphalt  

 

See the source image

Frodo, I have never seen such a spike, but I surveyed on the other side of the country.  We always just used Magnails or a railroad spike.  From what I can see #1 comes to a definite point.  I think Zuludog is correct, it's probably a countersink.

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Thanks for the picture of it in it's natural environment.  As I said, we used Magnails.  Almost as long, but cheaper, running about 32¢ for the 3 1/2" long ones.  But as I said, I surveyed on the other side of the country.  Different place, different norms.

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On 12/29/2020 at 11:47 AM, fredk said:

I'm not sure

#2 is for a shoe sole, I think its a book binders edger

I finally found what #2 tool is

I have a tool like the #2 tool where the wheel height is adjustable. Whether it is used on soles or books, I think the wheel itself is used to mark the leather. I have seen this wheeled tool used, by 2 shoe makers on youtube, to mark the sole of high end shoes like Allen Edmond's. With having an adjustable wheel height/depth of just over 125", I wonder if it is used for something else other than marking the leather? ??

 

 

#2 is a Slide Box Seat Wheel Tool for shoe and boot heal patterns. Here is a link:

https://www.carreducker.com/shop/shoe-making/tools/slide-box-seat-wheel/

Edited by ryano

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Hi,  #6 is spindle from a cotton picker machine.  I operated on in Buttomwillow, Ca. in my youth.  They make great pin drive punches. 

Howard

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