Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I am going to begin to start making western chaps. Does anyone know what type of tanning process the ranchers used in the 18th century. I am more interested in natural tanning techniques.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, hickok55 said:

I am going to begin to start making western chaps. Does anyone know what type of tanning process the ranchers used in the 18th century. I am more interested in natural tanning techniques.

veg tan and brain tan for two. chrome tan (chemical) invented about 1850. chaps were invented early in the 19th century in Mexico further evolved in Texas starting about 1830s or 40s  from what i have read. 

Edited by chuck123wapati

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, hickok55 said:

I am going to begin to start making western chaps. Does anyone know what type of tanning process the ranchers used in the 18th century. I am more interested in natural tanning techniques.

Were chaps an Anglo thing in the 18th century or were they still the preserve of the vaquero at that time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Matt S said:

Were chaps an Anglo thing in the 18th century or were they still the preserve of the vaquero at that time?

afair, the chaps were in use by South American cattle drovers first, then the idea worked north into Mexico and then spread through the US cattle states. Early on 100% of cattle drovers were Mexican or mixed-birth, then by about 1860s about 10% were white Caucasians, Mexicans and mixed-birth still dominated the cattle droving. After the War-between-the-States (aka the US Civil War) more European types moved into that employment but afair it never got above 20 to 25%. But the demand for cattle had grown so much that that 20% was still several thousand men.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thank you for the replies. would there be any difference making chaps out of veg tanned instead of chrome tanned. =⁍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

On 1/1/2022 at 2:12 PM, hickok55 said:

I am going to begin to start making western chaps. Does anyone know what type of tanning process the ranchers used in the 18th century.

I want to check if you are mixing up your Century with the Years, a common & easily made mistake

18th Century = 1700s

19th Century = 1800s

afaik 18th Century / 1700s chaps were very simple and basic whereas 19th Century / 1800s, especially later 1800s Western Chaps had some more fancy leatherwork on them,  usually on the belt area

12 hours ago, hickok55 said:

. . . would there be any difference making chaps out of veg tanned instead of chrome tanned. =⁍

In the main the answer is Yes. Its a difference of temper. Chrome tan, ime, is never as stiff as Veg tan. If the chaps are just for costume you could get away using chrome tan but you'd still need veg tan for the belt and fancy tooled panels. If for serious use or wear you need veg tan right through

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. yes i meant 19th century. where conchos use for chap closure on shotgun chaps.
Edited by hickok55

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, hickok55 said:
  1. yes i meant 19th century. where conchos use for chap closure on shotgun chaps.

http://www.goligerleather.us/id405.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thank you does anyone have a chap lacing diagram for closure

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...