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Danne

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About Danne

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    https://www.instagram.com/danralsweden/

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    Making wallets and watch straps.
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  1. Thank you, I actually don't know, because my knowledge about different leathers are limited so I would have to do some tests. I really like mixing different leather. So I think I would prefer an exterior in shell, and interior in goat or alpina calf (epsom) or similar.
  2. Yes, just like Hardrada said, it's lined with chevre. I'm certainly no leather expert, but the strongest part of the leather is the grain. And there is no problem to make a leather in 1mm goat leather (no lining) but if I instead line the pocket and use two layers of 0.5mm leather it will be stronger, and of course stretch less, so the wallet interior will keep it's shape better, and just like Hardrada also said it look better.
  3. I haven't had that problem. Maybe you need to burnish more after you put on wax?
  4. I know there are other tutorials like this, and also tutorials that probably are a lot better than mine. But there are many ways to burnish edges, and I shared my way in a comment in a post. So I thought I share it as it's own post, and I hope it's okay and that someone appreciate it. (I usually paint my edges with edge paint, but have experimented a little bit with burnishing too) 1. Make sure you don’t use too much glue, use water based or solvent based contact cement and a thin layer. If you need, you can prime with a thin layer, and add another. But NEVER a thick layer of glue. Press together really firm. 2. Let dry (time depends on glue) if you don’t let the glue cure, you will push in the glue when you burnish and get a very visible glue line. 3 Flush cut or sand edge flat. 4. Bevel edge. 5. Wet the edge with water (use a brush) to raise the fibres for later sanding, and let dry. 6. (Optional) Crease 7. (Optional) dye edge, I didn’t do this on the test piece here. 8. Wet edge with water and burnish with canvas or other heavier fabric. 9. Sand with 800 grit. 10. Put a burnishing agent on the edge, I prefer Tokonole. And burnish. 11. Burnish with canvas or other heavier fabric. 12. "Burnish" with 1200 grit sand paper (wet and dry) and keep burnish until your sand paper ”clogs up” don’t move it to fresh sand paper. When your sandpaper start to clog up you will burnish, you hear it on the sound from the friction. 13. Keep doing step 10-12 until all imperfections are gone. 14. Melt paraffin wax on the edge. 15. Burnish with a soft cloth (Like t-shirt) The edge is smooth as glass, unfortunately I can’t take any good photos that really show how smooth the edge is.
  5. I think it looks awesome. The combination between the pull-up leather and natural veg tan looks awesome. Clean stitching and cutting. Well done.
  6. This website seems to be a good solution also, you can upload photos and choose file size, and you get them downloaded in a zip-file. https://bulkresizephotos.com/
  7. Danne

    My work

    Sure, I do that.
  8. Danne

    My work

    Yes, it makes sense. Btw I found a website where it's possible to "bulk resize" photos, and you can choose file size. Then you get them downloaded as a zip file. https://bulkresizephotos.com/
  9. Danne

    My work

    If you have the original photos and want to share them here, you can upload them to imgur.com and copy the image link, and post them here.
  10. I add something here regarding the awls. I didn't like using awls before, because I could never get a good result. But at the same time I knew that for making wallets with skived edges and to get a good result I need to learn how to use an awl. Finally when I figured out how to reshape and sharpen my awls I was surprised how easy it was to get a good consistent result, and now I use it for all my wallets and card holders.
  11. I'm curious what made you decide to go for Blanchard? Do you have Wuta European pricking irons now, do you think Blanchard will give you a better more consistent result? I only make wallets/card holder and watch straps. I have Ksblade 2,5,10 And the irons I have from Kevin Lee is 2 and 8. So I would say 2 + 8-10 works perfect for wallets, if I made bags (and only bags) it would be nice with more teeth.
  12. I have Renia's thinner, bu still stringy. Don't get me wrong here Colle is a good glue, but in my opinion not the best choice for small leather goods, maybe more suited for a cobbler or something. I had Syntic Total in a "lid jar" with a diy gasket for months now, and use it rarely and in small amounts when water based glue isn't enough. And I think (don't quote me on this) that you can thin it down with acetone (If you are curious just check Renia's website, and the document for that glue)
  13. I find Colle de Cologne super hard to work with because it's so stringy. (Even after it's thinned out) Renia Syntic Total and Renia Ortec are two alternatives I think you should try. My favorite is Syntic Total.
  14. The few times I have burnished edges, I have used Fiebings oil dye (don't mix it up with Fiebings edge kote, which is in my opinion a edge paint that is not that durable) You might want to burnish the edge with water one time before you dye the edge. It depends on if you crease the edge or not, and what type of creaser you use. The creaser iron I used here round off and "seal" the edge transition which make it possible to dye the edge before burnish. But if your edge is just sanded your dye might seep up into the surface of the leather if you don't burnish the edge first. If you want to try painting edges I have a tutorial for this here. There are a couple of popular brands for edge paint, but I have only used Fenice and Uniters and I use the same technique with both of the brands.
  15. This is how I do it, when I burnish edges. But I prefer to paint my edges with edge paint. 1. Make sure you don’t use too much glue, use water based or solvent based contact cement and a thin layer. If you need, you can prime with a thin layer, and add another. But NEVER a thick layer of glue. Press together really firm. 2. Let dry (time depends on glue) if you don’t let the glue cure, you will push in the glue when you burnish and get a very visible glue line. 3 Flush cut or sand edge flat. 4. Bevel edge. 5. Wet the edge with water (use a brush) to raise the fibres for later sanding, and let dry. 6. (Optional) Crease 7. (Optional) dye edge, I didn’t do this on the test piece here. 8. Wet edge with water and burnish with canvas or other heavier fabric. 9. Sand with 800 grit. 10. Put a burnishing agent on the edge, I prefer Tokonole. And burnish. 11. Burnish with canvas or other heavier fabric. 12. "Burnish" with 1200 grit sand paper (wet and dry) and keep burnish until your sand paper ”clogs up” don’t move it to fresh sand paper. When your sandpaper start to clog up you will burnish, you hear it on the sound from the friction. 13. Keep doing step 10-12 until all imperfections are gone. 14. Melt paraffin wax on the edge. 15. Burnish with a soft cloth (Like t-shirt) The edge is smooth as glass, unfortunately I can’t take any good photos that really show how smooth the edge is.
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